news

Life Sciences - May 25
Life Sciences
Using a combination of behavioural trials in the field, computational visual modelling and a computer-based detection experiment, the study published in PNAS reveals that, while glass frog translucency does act as camouflage, the mechanism differs from that of true transparency. Lead author, Dr James Barnett who began the research while a PhD student at the University of Bristol and is now based at McMaster University in Canada, said: “The frogs are always green but appear to brighten and darken depending on the background.
Health - May 25
Health

Researchers have found a way to design an antibody that can identify the toxic particles that destroy healthy brain cells - a potential advance in the fight against Alzheimer's disease.

Health - May 22

The University of Glasgow is one of six universities to have contributed to the largest cohort study to date on the detailed characterisation of hospital COVID-19 patients in the world.

Health - May 23
Health

Martin Llewelyn, Professor of Infectious Diseases at Brighton and Sussex Medical School ( BSMS ), is leading the UK arm of a global study, which is opening at hospital sites in Brighton and Oxford,

History - May 22

Writing for The Conversation, PhD student Ida R. Ahmad (UCL Institute for Sustainable Heritage) explains that precious historical documents are under threat from 'vinegar syndrome', which causes film to decompose.


Category


Years
2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009


Results 1 - 20 of 574.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 29 Next »


Life Sciences - 25.05.2020
Through glass frogs' translucent camouflage
Through glass frogs’ translucent camouflage
Using a combination of behavioural trials in the field, computational visual modelling and a computer-based detection experiment, the study published in PNAS reveals that, while glass frog translucency does act as camouflage, the mechanism differs from that of true transparency. Lead author, Dr James Barnett who began the research while a PhD student at the University of Bristol and is now based at McMaster University in Canada, said: “The frogs are always green but appear to brighten and darken depending on the background.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.05.2020
Antibody designed to recognise pathogens of Alzheimer's disease
Antibody designed to recognise pathogens of Alzheimer’s disease
Researchers have found a way to design an antibody that can identify the toxic particles that destroy healthy brain cells - a potential advance in the fight against Alzheimer's disease.

Health - 23.05.2020
BSMS researchers lead the way in international trial to protect healthcare workers from Covid-19
BSMS researchers lead the way in international trial to protect healthcare workers from Covid-19
Martin Llewelyn, Professor of Infectious Diseases at Brighton and Sussex Medical School ( BSMS ), is leading the UK arm of a global study, which is opening at hospital sites in Brighton and Oxford, to test if either chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine can prevent Covid-19 in vital frontline healthcare workers.

Health - 22.05.2020
UofG contributes to largest cohort study to date on characterisation of COVID-19 hospital patients
The University of Glasgow is one of six universities to have contributed to the largest cohort study to date on the detailed characterisation of hospital COVID-19 patients in the world. The new study - published today in The BMJ and led by the University of Liverpool, University of Edinburgh and Imperial College London - revealed age, male sex, obesity, and underlying illness have emerged as risk factors for severe COVID-19 or death in the UK.

History / Archeology - 22.05.2020
Opinion: Historical films may be decaying much faster than we thought
Writing for The Conversation, PhD student Ida R. Ahmad (UCL Institute for Sustainable Heritage) explains that precious historical documents are under threat from 'vinegar syndrome', which causes film to decompose. A significant chunk of the world's history is facing an existential threat.  US government deeds ,  recordings of Indigenous Australians  and  photographs of English seaside life spanning three decades  are just some of the historical documents recorded on acetate film that are suffering irreversible damage due to what's known as vinegar syndrome.

Health - Computer Science - 22.05.2020
New contact tracing app for COVID-19 spread designed to protect privacy
A new app developed at Imperial College London aims to protect privacy whilst trying to minimise coronavirus spread. As part of their efforts to slow the outbreak of coronavirus , international governments, research institutions and industry are developing contact tracing apps to record interactions between people.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.05.2020
SARS-CoV-2 mutations do not appear to increase transmissibility
None of the mutations currently documented in the SARS-CoV-2 virus appear to increase its transmissibility, according to a UCL-led study. The analysis of virus genomes from over 15,000 Covid-19 patients from 75 countries is published today as a pre-print on bioRxiv and has not yet been peer-reviewed.

Health - Social Sciences - 22.05.2020
Children appear half as likely to catch COVID-19 as adults
Children and young people appear to be more than 50% less likely to catch SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, than adults but evidence remains weak on how likely they are to transmit the virus, finds a UCL-led review of test and tracing and population screening studies. Researchers say the findings, which are awaiting peer review and formal publication, provide further evidence on children's susceptibility to COVID-19, and the data will be important for governments making decisions about school reopening and easing lockdown restrictions.

Environment - Life Sciences - 22.05.2020
First evidence of microplastics passing from insects to predators in rivers
First evidence of microplastics passing from insects to predators in rivers
A species of river bird is swallowing hundreds of plastic fibres every day via their insect prey, research by Cardiff University and the Greenpeace Research Laboratories at the University of Exeter has shown. Dippers are also inadvertently feeding thousands of plastic fibres contained in insects to their nest-bound chicks during their development.

Health - 22.05.2020
Mental health issues ’substantial health concern’ among police internationally
Mental health issues are a "substantial health concern" among police officers, with around one in four potentially drinking at hazardous levels, and around one in 10 meeting the criteria for anxiety disorder and suicidal thoughts, finds a UCL-led study. The pooled data analysis of available international evidence, published online today in Occupational & Environmental Medicine , also found that one in seven officers meet criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder and depression.

Health - Psychology - 22.05.2020
Conspiracy beliefs reduces the following of government coronavirus guidance | University of Oxford
A new study from the shows that people who hold coronavirus conspiracy beliefs are less likely to comply with social distancing guidelines or take-up future vaccines.  The research, led by clinical psychologists at the and published today in the journal  Psychological Medicine , indicates that a disconcertingly high number of adults in England do not agree with the scientific and governmental consensus on the coronavirus pandemic.

Health - 21.05.2020
Potential US COVID-19 resurgence modelled as lockdowns ease
Potential US COVID-19 resurgence modelled as lockdowns ease
Increased mobility in the United States as lockdown measures lift could result in a surge of coronavirus infections and deaths. While the US had an initial 2.2 national average R reproduction number earlier in the outbreak, 24 states still have a reproduction number above the critical threshold of one, Imperial modellers have found.

Physics - 21.05.2020
New gravitational-wave model can bring neutron stars into even sharper focus
Gravitational-wave researchers at the University of Birmingham have developed a new model that promises to yield fresh insights into the structure and composition of neutron stars. The model shows that vibrations, or oscillations, inside the stars can be directly measured from the gravitational-wave signal alone.

Chemistry - 21.05.2020
Chemical recycling makes useful product from waste bioplastic
A faster, more efficient way of recycling plant-based “bioplastics” has been developed by a team of scientists at the Universities of Birmingham and Bath. The team has shown how their chemical recycling method not only speeds up the process, it can also be converted into a new product - a biodegradable solvent - which can be sold for use in a wide variety of industries including cosmetics and pharmaceuticals.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.05.2020
Oxford leads on UK trial sites testing potential COVID-19 preventatives
The Diabetes Trial Unit (DTU) in the Radcliffe Department of Medicine is managing the UK sites for a global study testing if either chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine can prevent COVID-19 in vital frontline healthcare workers. Laboratory evidence shows that these well-established drugs might be effective in preventing or treating COVID-19 but there is no conclusive proof.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 21.05.2020
High doses of vitamin D supplementation has no benefit in preventing or treating COVID-19
Scientists from the UK, Europe and the USA, including experts from the University of Birmingham, have published a vitamin D consensus paper warning against high doses of vitamin D supplementation. According to the study, current research shows vitamin D has no benefit in preventing or treating Covid-19.

Environment - 21.05.2020
World can likely capture and store enough carbon dioxide to meet climate targets
World can likely capture and store enough carbon dioxide to meet climate targets
The world is currently on track to fulfil scenarios on diverting atmospheric CO2 to underground reservoirs, according to a new study by Imperial. The capture and storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) underground is one of the key components of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 's (IPCC) reports keeping global warming to less than 2°C above pre-industrial levels by 2100.

Physics - Computer Science - 20.05.2020
Quantum leap: Bristol's photon discovery is a major step toward large-scale quantum technologies
Quantum leap: Bristol’s photon discovery is a major step toward large-scale quantum technologies
The development of quantum technologies promises to have a profound impact across science, engineering and society. Quantum computers at scale will be able to solve problems intractable on even the most powerful current supercomputers, with many revolutionary applications, for example, in the design of new drugs and materials.

Health - Social Sciences - 20.05.2020
Most young people with increased suicide risk only display 'mild to moderate' mental distress - study
Most young people with increased suicide risk only display ’mild to moderate’ mental distress - study
Around 70% of young people who report self-harming or suicidal thoughts are within normal or non-clinical range of mental distress.   Even modest improvements in mental health and wellbeing across the entire population may prevent more suicides than targeting only those who are severely depressed or anxious Peter Jones The vast majority of young people who self-harm or experience suicidal thoughts appear to have only mild or moderate mental distress, instead of more obvious symptoms associated with a diagnosable disorder, according to a new study.

Life Sciences - Palaeontology - 20.05.2020
Ancient giant armoured fish fed in a similar way to basking sharks
Ancient giant armoured fish fed in a similar way to basking sharks
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the University of Zurich have shown that the Titanichthys - a giant armoured fish that lived in the seas and oceans of the late Devonian period 380-million-years ago - fed in a similar manner to modern day basking sharks. Titanichthys has long been known as one of the largest animals of the Devonian - its exact size is difficult to determine, but it likely exceeded five metres in length; like in the basking shark, its lower jaw reached lengths exceeding one metre.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 29 Next »

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |