Environment - Sep 20
Professor Mark Maslin (UCL Geography) writes about common climate change myths and explains how each can be disproven. The science of climate change is more than 150 years old and it is probably the most tested area of modern science. However the energy industry, political lobbyists and others have spent the last 30 years sowing doubt about the science where none really exists.
Health - Sep 20
Health

Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From new models of Brazilian investment without ecological destruction, to fresh insights into photosynthesis, here is some quick-read news from across the College.

Pharmacology - Sep 20

A technique that will enable cancer patients to hold their breath during prolonged bouts of radiotherapy treatment has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham.

Pharmacology - Sep 20

One of the most common antidepressants, sertraline, leads to an early reduction in anxiety symptoms, commonly found in depression, several weeks before any improvement in depressive symptoms, a UCL-led clinical trial has found.

Environment - Sep 19

A report investigating travel habits in seven European cities reveals environmental and social drivers that make people choose to walk. The new research reveals these include social factors such as how safe people feel and how concerned they are about air pollution, and urban design, such as how connected streets are and how close people are to public transport links.


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Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 20.09.2019
Opinion: Five climate change science misconceptions - debunked
Professor Mark Maslin (UCL Geography) writes about common climate change myths and explains how each can be disproven. The science of climate change is more than 150 years old and it is probably the most tested area of modern science. However the energy industry, political lobbyists and others have spent the last 30 years sowing doubt about the science where none really exists.

Health - Environment - 20.09.2019
Sustainable growth and energy insights: News from the College
Sustainable growth and energy insights: News from the College
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From new models of Brazilian investment without ecological destruction, to fresh insights into photosynthesis, here is some quick-read news from across the College. Brazil's (and the world's) climate conundrum As one of the world's ten largest economies, Brazil has the potential for a unique model of economic progress.

Pharmacology - 20.09.2019
Antidepressants may reduce anxiety more than depressive symptoms
One of the most common antidepressants, sertraline, leads to an early reduction in anxiety symptoms, commonly found in depression, several weeks before any improvement in depressive symptoms, a UCL-led clinical trial has found. Published in The Lancet Psychiatry and funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), this is the largest-ever placebo-controlled trial of an antidepressant, which has not been funded by the pharmaceutical industry.

Pharmacology - Health - 20.09.2019
Breath-holding technique could improve outcomes for radiotherapy patients
A technique that will enable cancer patients to hold their breath during prolonged bouts of radiotherapy treatment has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham. In the study, published in Radiotherapy and Oncology , researchers demonstrated that, by safely increasing oxygen levels in the lungs and removing carbon dioxide from blood, it is possible for individuals to hold their breath for multiple four-minute periods during treatment.

Environment - Social Sciences - 19.09.2019
How can more walking be encouraged in cities?
A report investigating travel habits in seven European cities reveals environmental and social drivers that make people choose to walk. The new research reveals these include social factors such as how safe people feel and how concerned they are about air pollution, and urban design, such as how connected streets are and how close people are to public transport links.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 19.09.2019
Opinion: How we detected water on a potentially habitable exoplanet for the first time
Angelos Tsiaras (UCL Physics & Astronomy) writes about the methods used to discover water vapour in the atmosphere of K2-18 b, the first potentially habitable planet outside of our solar system. With more than 4,000 exoplanets - planets orbiting stars other than our sun - discovered so far, it may seem like we are on the cusp of finding out whether we are alone in the universe.

Law - Innovation / Technology - 19.09.2019
Opinion: Why forensic science is in crisis and how we can fix it
Professor Ruth Morgan (UCL Security and Crime Science) writes about the misinterpretation of forensic evidence and the issues that this causes for the criminal justice system. Imagine you're in court, accused of a crime that you know you didn't commit. Now imagine a scientist takes the stand and starts explaining to the court how your DNA is on the murder weapon.

Social Sciences - 19.09.2019
Women’s exercise time must be ’valued’
Women benefit hugely from running but society must ensure their exercise time is not compromised by work and family commitments, new research from Cardiff University suggests. Researchers partnered Cardiff University/Cardiff Half Marathon organisers Run 4 Wales to investigate why women run and the barriers around participation.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.09.2019
Babies born by C-section have different gut bacteria
Babies born by caesarean section have a reduced level of "good" gut bacteria and an increased number of pathogens linked to hospital environments, according to research co-led by UCL that is the most comprehensive study of the baby microbiome to date. In the study researchers analysed gut bacteria in stool samples taken from 596 babies born in British hospitals - 314 babies who had a natural, or vaginal, birth, and 282 who were born by caesarean.

Environment - 19.09.2019
Coastal communities highly threatened by rising sea-levels, even with climate change mitigation
An international group of scientists have urgently called on world leaders to accelerate efforts to tackle climate change. Almost every aspect of the planet's environment and ecology is undergoing changes as a result of climate change, some of which are profound if not catastrophic for the future. Rising sea-levels is one of the biggest threats.

Environment - 18.09.2019
Shifting the focus of climate-change strategies may benefit younger generations
Strategies to limit climate change that focus on warming in the next couple of decades would leave less of a burden for future generations. Research led by Imperial College London and the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Austria, suggests a new underpinning logic for strategies that seek to limit climate change.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.09.2019
Babies’ gut bacteria affected by delivery method
Babies born vaginally have different gut bacteria - their microbiome - than those delivered by Caesarean, research has shown. Scientists from the University of Birmingham, Wellcome Sanger Institute, UCL, and their collaborators discovered that whereas vaginally born babies got most of their gut bacteria from their mother, babies born via caesarean did not, and instead had more bacteria associated with hospital environments in their guts.

Life Sciences - 18.09.2019
Why humans take so long to grow up
Why do our children take so long to grow up, compared to other animals? We all know that humans have big brains. In common with apes, we grow relatively slowly and generally have long lives. What is not yet entirely clear is why we have this slow steady development and live longer than species with smaller brains.

Innovation / Technology - 17.09.2019
Smiths Detection joins Imperial White City's security and defence ecosystem
Smiths Detection joins Imperial White City’s security and defence ecosystem
Global threat detection and security technologies company Smiths Detection have announced the opening of an office at Imperial College London. The new office is opened in the I-Hub with the intention of establishing an R&D partnership between the two organizations. Smiths Detection, part of Smiths Group, specialises in sensors and detection technology for security and defence purposes.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 17.09.2019
Identifies a climate signature in rivers globally
A new study, including scientists from Cardiff University and published today , discovers a clear climatic signature on rivers globally that challenges existing theories. If you walk from a river's source to its mouth, you walk a path that descends in elevation. In some rivers, this path will descend steeply out of the uplands, and then flatten out in the lowlands.

Innovation / Technology - Life Sciences - 17.09.2019
Novel viruses carried by the Scottish midge
Novel viruses carried by the Scottish midge
Scientists discover novel viruses carried by the Scottish midge Scotland's biting midge population carries previously-unknown viruses, according to new research. The study - published in Viruses and carried out by scientists at the MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research (CVR) - used high throughput sequencing to study, for the first time, the total collection of viruses in the biting midge ( Culicoides impunctatus ).

Social Sciences - 17.09.2019
Major new report takes stock of violence in Scotland
Researchers based at the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research have published a major new report which consolidates existing knowledge on violence in Scotland. A wealth of research has been conducted in Scotland over the last decade which has been essential in helping us understand violent offending in this country, but this is the first time that evidence has been compiled into one document.

Health - Pharmacology - 17.09.2019
How animal research is helping fight antibiotic resistance
How animal research is helping fight antibiotic resistance
We explore how animal research is playing a vital role in the battle against antibiotic resistant superbugs. People do not expect to die from a simple infection. But that might change: the world is running out of effective antibiotics. For decades, diseases like bacterial gastroenteritis and colitis have not been a serious health threat, thanks to antibiotics.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 17.09.2019
Brain activity intensity drives need for sleep
Brain activity intensity drives need for sleep
The intensity of brain activity during the day, notwithstanding how long we've been awake, appears to increase our need for sleep, according to a new UCL study in zebrafish. The research, published in Neuron , found a gene that responds to brain activity in order to coordinate the need for sleep. It helps shed new light on how sleep is regulated in the brain.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.09.2019
Identifies a climate signature in rivers globally
A new study, led by scientists from the University of Bristol and published , discovers a clear climatic signature on rivers globally that challenges existing theories. For decades geoscientists have been trying to detect the influence of climate on the formation of rivers, but up to now there has been no systematic evidence.
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