Life Sciences - Jan 24
Scientists have examined a key receptor for the first time at high resolution - broadening understanding of how it might function, and opening the door to future improvements in treating conditions such as type 2 diabetes - a significant global health problem. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors (GLP1R) are found on insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas and neurons in the brain.
Pharmacology - Jan 24

Researchers from the University of Bristol and University Hospital Southampton have found that a drug used widely to treat a common eye condition has 'no benefit' and should no longer be used. Eplerenone, which is primarily used to treat heart failure, is currently offered widely by ophthalmologists as a treatment for central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) based on limited clinical data.

Health - Jan 23
Health

Research reveals stark inconsistencies in official UK guidance on Lyme disease. Official guidance on the diagnosis and testing of Lyme disease contains worrying inconsistencies, according to a new research paper.

Life Sciences - Jan 23

A new study shows for the first time that the striking iridescent colours seen in some animals increase their chances of survival against predators by acting as a means of camouflage. Rather than reveal it seems these dynamically changing shades are used to conceal, according to the University of Bristol study published today [23 January] in Current Biology.

Life Sciences - Jan 22

Scientists have discovered that a non-invasive technique which could one day be used to treat Parkinson's disease, can successfully target a highly specific group of brain cells which play a key role in development of the condition.


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Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 24.01.2020
Researchers obtain ’high-definition’ view of diabetes-related proteins
Scientists have examined a key receptor for the first time at high resolution - broadening understanding of how it might function, and opening the door to future improvements in treating conditions such as type 2 diabetes - a significant global health problem. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors (GLP1R) are found on insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas and neurons in the brain.

Pharmacology - Health - 24.01.2020
Drug used widely to treat eye condition has ’no benefit’
Researchers from the University of Bristol and University Hospital Southampton have found that a drug used widely to treat a common eye condition has 'no benefit' and should no longer be used. Eplerenone, which is primarily used to treat heart failure, is currently offered widely by ophthalmologists as a treatment for central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) based on limited clinical data.

Life Sciences - 23.01.2020
Brilliant iridescence can conceal as well as attract
A new study shows for the first time that the striking iridescent colours seen in some animals increase their chances of survival against predators by acting as a means of camouflage. Rather than reveal it seems these dynamically changing shades are used to conceal, according to the University of Bristol study published today [23 January] in Current Biology.

Health - Pharmacology - 23.01.2020
Reveals stark inconsistencies in official UK guidance on Lyme disease
Reveals stark inconsistencies in official UK guidance on Lyme disease
Research reveals stark inconsistencies in official UK guidance on Lyme disease Official guidance on the diagnosis and testing of Lyme disease contains worrying inconsistencies, according to a new research paper. Professor Alex Faulkner at the University of Sussex, and national patient organisation Lyme Research UK have revealed stark discrepancies between the different policy and clinical practice guidance documents issued by Public Health England and other health bodies.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.01.2020
Possible Parkinson’s treatment successfully targets two major nerve systems
Scientists have discovered that a non-invasive technique which could one day be used to treat Parkinson's disease, can successfully target a highly specific group of brain cells which play a key role in development of the condition. In 2015, scientists demonstrated that a form of gene therapy could target and stimulate a group of nerve cells affected by the disease, called cholinergic neurons.

Health - Physics - 22.01.2020
Magnetised molecules used to monitor breast cancer
Magnetised molecules used to monitor breast cancer
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Health - Pharmacology - 21.01.2020
Immune cell health discovery could optimise cancer therapies
Scientists at UCL have discovered how immune cells, essential for tackling infections and cancers, are able to 'recycle' material within themselves in order to stay healthy and function, a breakthrough finding which could lead to more effective immunotherapies. In the study, published in Cell Reports , researchers investigated how 'autophagy' - the natural physiological process of 'self-eating' which allows intracellular components, such as mitochondria, to be degraded and replaced - takes place in liver-based T cells.

Health - Social Sciences - 21.01.2020
Health gap between rich and poor has widened
The health of the poorest people in Britain has declined since the mid-20th century, and is worse when compared to those born a century ago, suggests a new UCL-led study. The study, published in the BMJ Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health , compared health and income data from more than 200,000 working-age adults who were born between 1920 and 1970.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 21.01.2020
Earth's oldest known impact might have ended 'snowball Earth' ice age
Earth’s oldest known impact might have ended ’snowball Earth’ ice age
New evidence has confirmed Australia's Yarrabubba crater as the world's oldest preserved impact structure - but did it thaw Earth and end an ice age? The crater is regarded as one of Earth's oldest, but until now has lacked a precise age. Now, a new study has used geological dating to pin the impact to 2.229 billion years ago - a time that coincided with Earth's recovery from an ice age known as ‘ Snowball Earth ', where most of Earth's surface was covered with ice sheets between two and five kilometres thick.

Environment - Health - 21.01.2020
Festival fireworks celebrations’ health impact on vulnerable people - study
Fireworks associated with festival celebrations such as Australia Day, China's Lunar New Year and Fourth of July, in the USA, may have a significant impact on the health of vulnerable people - a new study reveals. Using fireworks during these celebrations generates anthropogenic source of air pollutants with significant impacts on local air quality, creating up to eight times the average of particulate matter (PM) concentration in the environment during and immediately after the event.

Social Sciences - Environment - 21.01.2020
New housing design in England overwhelmingly ’mediocre’ or ’poor’
The design of new housing developments in England is overwhelmingly 'mediocre' or 'poor', with less-affluent communities the worst affected, according to a national audit conducted by UCL for CPRE, the countryside charity, and the Place Alliance. A housing design audit for England reveals that 75% of new housing development should not have gone ahead due to 'mediocre' or 'poor' design.

Life Sciences - Environment - 21.01.2020
Small predators lose out from human land use
Predators, especially small invertebrates like spiders and ladybirds, are the most likely to be lost when natural habitats are converted to agricultural land or towns and cities, finds a new UCL-led study. The first of its kind, global study on the impacts of human land use on different groups of animals is published in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology .

Environment - 21.01.2020
Emissions of potent greenhouse gas have grown, contradicting reports of huge reductions
Over the last two decades, scientists have been keeping a close eye on the atmospheric concentration of a hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) gas, known as HFC-23. This gas has very few industrial applications. However, levels have been soaring because it is vented to the atmosphere during the production of another chemical widely used in cooling systems in developing countries.

Environment - 21.01.2020
Arctic sea ice can’t ’bounce back’
Arctic sea ice cannot “quickly bounce back” once climate change causes it to melt, new research suggests. A team including scientists from Cardiff University used the shells of quahog clams, which can live for hundreds of years, and climate models to discover how Arctic sea ice has changed over the last 1,000 years.

Health - Pharmacology - 20.01.2020
Could reduce the risk of sudden cardiac death
New research has shown that by changing the time course of voltage change early when the heart cell contracts it is possible to both withhold a potentially lethal electrical disturbance and improve the strength of cardiac contraction in heart failure at the same time. The research led by the University of Bristol and funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC) is published today [20 January] in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

Environment - 20.01.2020
Confirms the Importance of Tiger Population in Thailand Forest Complex
A new scientific survey has reinforced the importance of one of the world's only remaining breeding populations of Indochinese tigers and provided evidence of tiger cubs in eastern Thailand's Dong Phayayen-Khao Yai Forest Complex. The study by researchers from the Department of Zoology's WildCRU , published in  Biological Conservation , discusses findings first announced in 2017 that the Dong Phayayen-Khao Yai Forest Complex supports a critically important breeding population of tigers.

Health - Pharmacology - 20.01.2020
Discovery of new T-cell raises prospect of 'universal' cancer therapy
Discovery of new T-cell raises prospect of ’universal’ cancer therapy
Researchers at Cardiff University have discovered a new type of killer T-cell that offers hope of a “one-size-fits-all” cancer therapy. T-cell therapies for cancer - where immune cells are removed, modified and returned to the patient's blood to seek and destroy cancer cells - are the latest paradigm in cancer treatments.

Astronomy / Space Science - 20.01.2020
Astronomers use 'cosmic echo-location' to map black hole surroundings
Astronomers use ’cosmic echo-location’ to map black hole surroundings
For Cambridge students For our researchers Business and enterprise Colleges and Departments Email and phone search Give to Cambridge Museums and collections Undergraduate Events and open days Fees and finance Postgraduate Postgraduate courses Fees and funding Frequently asked questions International students Continuing education Executive and professional education Courses in education How the University and Colleges work Visiting the University

Astronomy / Space Science - 20.01.2020
XMM-Newton uses light echoes to map dynamic black hole
XMM-Newton uses light echoes to map dynamic black hole
Material falling into a black hole throws X-rays out into space - and now, for the first time, the European Space Agency's (ESA) XMM-Newton X-ray observatory has used the reverberating echoes of this light to map the dynamic behaviour and surroundings of a black hole itself. Although most black holes are too small on the sky for us to resolve their immediate surroundings, we can explore these mysterious objects by watching how matter behaves as it nears, and falls into, them.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 20.01.2020
A chronicle of giant straight-tusked elephants
A chronicle of giant straight-tusked elephants
About 800,000 years ago, the giant straight-tusked elephant Palaeoloxodon migrated out of Africa and became widespread across Europe and Asia. It divided into many species, with distinct types in Japan, Central Asia and Europe — even some dwarf forms as large as a small donkey on some Mediterranean islands.
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