Chemistry - Sep 16
The power of nature could soon be used to create day-to-day materials such as paints, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals in a much more environmentally friendly way, thanks to a new breakthrough from scientists at Cardiff University. The international team, led by the Cardiff Catalysis Institute, has successfully unlocked the catalytic abilities of enzymes taken from fungi by creating the perfect conditions needed for them to function.
Health - Sep 16

A new study by the University of Bristol adds to evidence that links potential adverse effects of taking paracetamol during pregnancy.

Pharmacology - Sep 12
Pharmacology

Cancer patients on immunotherapy fare worse if they have recently taken antibiotics, with their response and overall survival rate 'crashing'.

Social Sciences - Sep 13

Most British adults, including a majority of Leave voters, think existing EU rules would provide "enough control" over EU immigration, according to a UCL and University of Cambridge survey conducted by YouGov.

Health - Sep 12

Statins could be used to treat older patients admitted to hospital with a severe type of pneumonia, researchers at the University of Birmingham have found.


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Chemistry - Life Sciences - 13:06
Breakthrough in harnessing the power of biological catalysts
The power of nature could soon be used to create day-to-day materials such as paints, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals in a much more environmentally friendly way, thanks to a new breakthrough from scientists at Cardiff University. The international team, led by the Cardiff Catalysis Institute, has successfully unlocked the catalytic abilities of enzymes taken from fungi by creating the perfect conditions needed for them to function.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.09.2019
Childhood behaviour linked to taking paracetamol during pregnancy
A new study by the University of Bristol adds to evidence that links potential adverse effects of taking paracetamol during pregnancy. The research published today (Monday 16 September) in Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology examined whether there were any effects of taking paracetamol in mid-pregnancy and the behaviour of the offspring between the ages of 6 month and 11 years, with memory and IQ tested up until the age of 17.

Social Sciences - 13.09.2019
Most Britons think EU immigration rules would provide "enough control"
Most British adults, including a majority of Leave voters, think existing EU rules would provide "enough control" over EU immigration, according to a UCL and University of Cambridge survey conducted by YouGov. Crucially, the survey revealed that few people are aware of restrictions the UK could enforce under existing EU free movement regulations.

Pharmacology - Health - 12.09.2019
Antibiotics reduce survival rates in cancer patients taking immunotherapy
Antibiotics reduce survival rates in cancer patients taking immunotherapy
Cancer patients on immunotherapy fare worse if they have recently taken antibiotics, with their response and overall survival rate 'crashing'. The findings come from a study of almost 200 cancer patients in the UK taking a type of immunotherapy called checkpoint inhibitors, part of the standard treatment pathway for cancer patients on the NHS.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.09.2019
Statins could protect older patients from severe pneumonia
Statins could be used to treat older patients admitted to hospital with a severe type of pneumonia, researchers at the University of Birmingham have found. A clinical trial, led by the University of Birmingham's Institute of Inflammation and Ageing , set out to determine if giving a high dose of a statin called simvastatin over a short period would improve immune system function for older adults who had been hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia with sepsis.

Environment - Microtechnics - 11.09.2019
’Flying fish’ robot can propel itself out of water and glide through the air
A bio-inspired bot uses water from the environment to create a gas and launch itself from the water's surface. The robot, which can travel 26 metres through the air after take-off, could be used to collect water samples in hazardous and cluttered environments, such as during flooding or when monitoring ocean pollution.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.09.2019
Brings personalised medicine to treat leukaemia one step closer
Scientists at the University of Birmingham have revealed the roles that different types of gene mutations play in causing blood cancers in a study that was the culmination of a decade's research. The findings of the team, led by Professor Constanze Bonifer and Professor Peter Cockerill of the University of Birmingham's Institute of Cancer and Genomic Studies , mean doctors are now one step closer to being able to provide tailored and targeted treatment specific to individual patients - increasing their chances of survival.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.09.2019
More die after surgery than from HIV, TB, and malaria combined - study
Around the world 4.2 million people die every year within 30 days after surgery - with half of these deaths occurring in lowand middle-income countries (LMICs), a new study reveals. There is also a significant unmet need for surgery in LMICs and researchers believe that if operations were provided for all patients who need them the number of global post-operative deaths would increase to 6.1 million.

Life Sciences - 11.09.2019
Calcium channel blockers may be effective in treating memory loss associated with Alzheimer's
Calcium channel blockers may be effective in treating memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia but the changes in brain cell function underlying memory loss remains poorly understood. Researchers at the University of Bristol have identified that calcium channel blockers may be effective in treating memory loss. The team's findings, published in Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience , found treating a diseased brain cell with a blocker of the L-type channel reduced the number of calcium ions able to flow into the brain cell.

Health - Microtechnics - 11.09.2019
Importance of EU for UK robotic surgery research
Importance of EU for UK robotic surgery research
Collaborations with EU researchers and institutions have been critical to the UK's success in robotic surgery research and innovation. This is according to a new study which examines the UK's global research collaboration network and models how the UK might compensate for any loss of EU collaborations after Brexit.

Life Sciences - 11.09.2019
Putting the squeeze on red blood cells
Putting the squeeze on red blood cells
For the first time, researchers at the University of Bristol's Blood and Transplant Research Unit, and the French National Institute for Blood Transfusion, have captured the moment a red blood cell is 'squeezed' while recording the changes that allow it to deform and subsequently recover its shape.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 11.09.2019
First water detected on potentially 'habitable' planet
First water detected on potentially ’habitable’ planet
Water vapour has been detected in the atmosphere of a super-Earth with habitable temperatures by UCL researchers in a world first. K2-18b, which is eight times the mass of Earth, is now the only planet orbiting a star outside the Solar System, or 'exoplanet', known to have both water and temperatures that could support life.

Social Sciences - 11.09.2019
UK military families struggle to access specialist domestic abuse support
Less than 10 per cent of domestic violence and abuse (DVA) services identify themselves as providing specialist support to military families, according to a new report from the University of Bristol. The report, from the Centre for Gender and Violence Research and funded by the Forces in Mind Trust (FiMT), also finds a lack of communication between the civilian and military sectors is hampering efforts to support victims and perpetrators of DVA within military families.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.09.2019
New bacterial strain discovered in England and Wales linked to scarlet fever
New bacterial strain discovered in England and Wales linked to scarlet fever
A team of scientists led by Imperial College London have discovered a new strain of group A streptococcus bacteria. Group A streptococcus (or Strep A) is known to cause scarlet fever , throat infections and - in very rare cases - invasive disease, where the bacterium enters the bloodstream or tissue and can trigger sepsis and toxic shock.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 10.09.2019
Europe's oldest lake traces 1.4 million years of Mediterranean climate
Europe’s oldest lake traces 1.4 million years of Mediterranean climate
New research by an international team of scientists, led by the University of Cologne and including the University of Bristol, has revealed a lake considered to be the oldest in Europe was first established 1.36 million years ago and has existed continuously ever since. Lake Ohrid, located at the border between the Republics of Albania and North Macedonia, is famous for its exceptional biodiversity, with more than 300 unique (endemic) animal and plant species.

Health - Pharmacology - 10.09.2019
Dietary supplement may help with schizophrenia
Dietary supplement may help with schizophrenia
A dietary supplement, sarcosine, may help with schizophrenia as part of a holistic approach complementing antipsychotic medication, according to a UCL researcher. In an editorial published in the British Journal of Psychiatry , Professor David Curtis (UCL Genetics, Evolution & Environment and QMUL Centre for Psychiatry) suggests the readily available product could easily be incorporated into treatment plans, while calling for clinical trials to clarify the benefit and inform guidelines.

Life Sciences - 10.09.2019
Foot painters' toes mapped like fingers in the brain
Foot painters’ toes mapped like fingers in the brain
Using your feet like hands can cause organised 'hand-like' maps of the toes in the brain, never before documented in people, finds a new UCL-led study of two professional foot painters. These findings, published in Cell Reports , demonstrate an extreme example of how the human body map can change in response to experience.

Health - Innovation / Technology - 09.09.2019
UK urged to lead brain-machine interface technology by Imperial-led report
UK urged to lead brain-machine interface technology by Imperial-led report
A Royal Society report, led by Imperial experts, has urged the UK Government to take the lead on tech that merges brain, body and machine. The report , part of a new perspective on this emerging technology and published by the Royal Society , argues that the UK government should launch a national investigation into neural interface technologies - devices that “blur the lines between mind and machine” - and their ethical implications.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 09.09.2019
First day of dinosaur extinction recorded in rocks at asteroid impact site
First day of dinosaur extinction recorded in rocks at asteroid impact site
Researchers probing the impact that wiped out the dinosaurs find evidence of wildfires and tsunami in the rocks at ground zero. An international team led by University of Texas and including Imperial College London researchers analysed more than 130 metres of rock that had built up over just one day - the day after the asteroid struck.

Health - Pharmacology - 09.09.2019
Blood test shows promise to aid better detection of lung cancer
Lung cancer can be spotted earlier and diagnosed more precisely with the help of a blood test, a major study carried out in Scotland has found. The Early Detection of Cancer of the Lung Scotland (ECLS) is the world's largest clinical biomarker trial looking into detecting early lung cancer using a blood test.
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