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Health - Jul 30
A study involving nearly half a million people in China reveals a clear link between cooking with wood or coal, and an increased risk of major eye diseases that can lead to blindness, according to a report published today in PLOS Medicine .
Life Sciences - Jul 30

How do we decide whether or not an activity which requires work is 'worth the effort'- Researchers at the University of Birmingham & University of Oxford have shown that the willingness to work is not static, and depends upon the fluctuating rhythms of fatigue.

Social Sciences - Jul 30

Children who live in the most deprived UK areas see far higher increases in body fat between the ages of seven and 17 compared to those from most advantaged areas, finds a new study by UCL researchers.

Environment - Jul 30
Environment

New research from the University of Oxford's Departments of Plant Sciences and Engineering, as well as collaborators at VU Amsterdam, uses both mathematical modelling and experimental validation to study the metabolic processes controlling how bacteria provide ammonia to legumes, which is vastly important for sustainable agriculture

Health - Jul 29

Light to moderate drinking may be associated with a decreased risk of heart attack, stroke, angina or death among those with cardiovascular disease, finds a new study led by a UCL researcher.


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Health - Social Sciences - 30.07.2021
Cooking with coal or wood associated with increased risk of major eye diseases
A study involving nearly half a million people in China reveals a clear link between cooking with wood or coal, and an increased risk of major eye diseases that can lead to blindness, according to a report published today in PLOS Medicine . About half the world's population - 3.8 billion individuals - are exposed to household air pollution from cooking using 'dirty' solid fuels, such as coal and wood.

Life Sciences - 30.07.2021
Motivation depends on how the brain processes fatigue
How do we decide whether or not an activity which requires work is 'worth the effort'- Researchers at the University of Birmingham & University of Oxford have shown that the willingness to work is not static, and depends upon the fluctuating rhythms of fatigue. Fatigue - the feeling of exhaustion from doing effortful tasks - is something we all experience daily.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 30.07.2021
New Oxford University research will help optimize environmentally friendly ways of fertilising plants
New Oxford University research will help optimize environmentally friendly ways of fertilising plants
New research from the University of Oxford's Departments of Plant Sciences and Engineering, as well as collaborators at VU Amsterdam, uses both mathematical modelling and experimental validation to study the metabolic processes controlling how bacteria provide ammonia to legumes, which is vastly important for sustainable agriculture Ammonia-based fertiliser is commonly used in industrial agriculture, and since the early 20 th  C.

Social Sciences - Health - 30.07.2021
Wide disparities in children’s body fat between most deprived and advantaged areas
Children who live in the most deprived UK areas see far higher increases in body fat between the ages of seven and 17 compared to those from most advantaged areas, finds a new study by UCL researchers. In the study, published in The Lancet Public Health , researchers found boys from the most deprived areas have a 3% higher fat mass index (FMI)* at age seven compared to those from the most advantaged areas, and by 17 it is 23% higher.

Health - 29.07.2021
Moderate drinking linked to fewer heart attacks in people with heart disease
Light to moderate drinking may be associated with a decreased risk of heart attack, stroke, angina or death among those with cardiovascular disease, finds a new study led by a UCL researcher. The new BMC Medicine meta-analysis study suggest that drinking up to 105 grams of alcohol per week - equivalent to 13 UK units of alcohol, less than six pints of medium-strength beer or just over one bottle of wine - could potentially confer some protective benefits.

Health - 29.07.2021
When stressed, people are quicker to jump to the worst conclusion
When under stress, people reach undesirable conclusions based on weaker evidence than when they are relaxed, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The findings, published today in the Journal of Neuroscience , show that stress can make people more likely to conclude the worst scenario is true.

Health - 28.07.2021
Homelessness linked to emergency hospital admissions
Patients experiencing homelessness use hospital services, especially emergency admissions, at much higher rates than housed patients according to new research published this week. The study's authors believe the research indicates the need to improve access to primary care, including GPs, along with implementing other interventions for people experiencing homelessness.

Environment - Health - 28.07.2021
Exploring how air pollution in indoor spaces affects human health
University of Birmingham experts are part of a new research programme investigating how air pollutants in indoor spaces such as homes, schools and workplaces can adversely affect human health. Researchers have received a share of £9 million funding from UK Research and Innovation across three separate four-year projects, each aimed at better understanding the composition, concentration and exposures of air pollutants and how these affect different health conditions.

Health - Social Sciences - 28.07.2021
Over a third of adults have multiple health problems in midlife
More than one in three British adults are suffering from two or more chronic health conditions in middle age, such as recurrent back problems, mental ill-health, high blood pressure, diabetes, and high-risk drinking, according to UCL researchers. The new study, published in  BMC Public Health,  shows that among Generation X - adults born in 1970 - those who grew up in poorer families are at much greater risk of having multiple long-term health problems in their late 40s.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.07.2021
Scientists use tiny bubbles to help treat common childhood cancer
Scientists use tiny bubbles to help treat common childhood cancer
Researchers at UCL have developed a new way to deliver drugs that can shut down cancer-promoting mutations in neuroblastoma. The findings in mice, show the method, which uses tiny bubbles to deliver therapies directly to tumour cells, reduced tumour growth and improved survival. Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumour found in children and accounts for about 15% of all cancer-related deaths in children.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 27.07.2021
On the hunt for 'hierarchical' black holes
On the hunt for ’hierarchical’ black holes
Black holes, detected by their gravitational wave signal as they collide with other black holes, could be the product of much earlier parent collisions. Such an event has only been hinted at so far, but scientists at the University of Birmingham in the UK, and Northwestern University in the US, believe we are getting close to tracking down the first of these so-called 'hierarchical' black holes.

Health - Computer Science - 27.07.2021
UK scientists designed world’s most sophisticated COVID-19 sequencing system - here’s how they did it
New bioinformatics software and cloud computing approaches developed at the University of Birmingham, have enabled the UK's COVID-19 genome sequencing effort to be the most sophisticated in the world. The system, called CLIMB-COVID was designed for the COVID-19 Genomics UK (COG-UK) consortium, set up in March 2020 to tackle the huge challenge of rapidly sequencing SARS-CoV-2 genomes.

Social Sciences - 27.07.2021
Poorest twice as likely to feel lonely in lockdown compared to richest
Poorest twice as likely to feel lonely in lockdown compared to richest
Older people in the poorest sector of the population were more than twice as likely to feel isolated and lonely during the first lockdown than the richest, finds a new study led by researchers from UCL and the University of Manchester. The researchers analysed data from 4,709 older men and women aged over 50 living in England who are part of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) to explore changes in the experiences of social isolation and loneliness during the pandemic.

Health - 27.07.2021
Shielding less effective than hoped
Shielding those at highest risk from Covid-19 during the first wave of the pandemic may not have been as effective at protecting them from infection and death as hoped, according to a new study. The research - led by the University of Glasgow and published in Scientific Reports - found that, between March and May 2020, patients advised to shield in NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHSGGC) experienced higher rates of infection and death than those not advised to shield.

Health - 27.07.2021
People with learning disabilities far more likely to die from respiratory illnesses
A new study into respiratory-associated deaths by the Scottish Learning Disabilities Observatory (SLDO) has found that people with learning disabilities are almost 11 times more likely to die prematurely from respiratory disease compared to other people. This unique study, published in the BMJ Open, examined data from more than 90,000 people with learning disabilities and 27,394 deaths, using literature published over the last 24 years.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 26.07.2021
Planets form in binary systems without getting crushed
Planets form in binary systems without getting crushed
Astronomers have developed the most realistic model to date of planet formation in binary star systems. Planet formation in binary systems is more complicated, because the companion star acts like a giant eggbeater, dynamically exciting the protoplanetary disc Roman Rafikov The researchers, from the University of Cambridge and the Max Planck Institute for Extra-terrestrial Physics, have shown how exoplanets in binary star systems - such as the 'Tatooine' planets spotted by NASA's Kepler Space Telescope - came into being without being destroyed in their chaotic birth environment.

Health - Pharmacology - 26.07.2021
More sensitive kidney disease test reveals cancer risk link
Using a more sensitive test than is commonly used in the NHS, researchers have been able to show, for the first time, that even mild kidney disease is associated with an increased risk of developing and dying from cancer. The new research, led by the University of Glasgow and published today in the journal EClinicalMedicine, shows that the more sensitive 'cystatin C' test was able to identify a heightened risk of developing and dying from cancer in people with chronic kidney disease.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 26.07.2021
Earth's interior is swallowing up more carbon than thought
Earth’s interior is swallowing up more carbon than thought
Scientists from Cambridge University and NTU Singapore have found that slow-motion collisions of tectonic plates drag more carbon into Earth's interior than previously thought.

Life Sciences - Physics - 26.07.2021
New imaging system brings brains into sharper focus
One of the greatest challenges in science is the study of the brain's anatomy and cellular architecture. Accurately visualising the brain's complex structure at high resolutions is critically important for improving our understanding of the functions of the central nervous system. A promising new technique, developed by scientists in Italy, the UK and Germany, is now bringing the microscopic details of the brain into sharper focus even over macroscopic volumes.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 23.07.2021
Machine learning used to successfully measure attachment in children
For the first time, researchers have used machine learning to successfully measure attachment in children - the vital human bond that humans first develop as infants to their caregivers. In new multi-disciplinary research, led by the University of Glasgow and published in PLOS ONE, the study team present a quick and easy way to measure attachment through a computer game, that has the potential to be used in largescale public health monitoring.
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