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Astronomy - Feb 25
Astronomy
The NASA InSight lander, which is supported by the UK Space Agency, has recorded 400 likely 'Marsquakes' in the first year of its mission. The seismic vibrations on Mars were detected by a set of silicon sensors developed in the UK for InSight's Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure (SEIS). Imperial College London, Oxford University, University of Bristol and STFC RAL Space worked in partnership, with £4 million in funding from the UK Space Agency, to develop three sensors which are sensitive enough to detect motion at sub-atomic scales.
Life Sciences - Feb 25
Life Sciences

Imperial College researchers London have invented a new health tracking sensor for pets and people that monitors vital signs through fur or clothing.

Media - Feb 25

Guidelines on reporting suicide are aimed at preventing further suicides and minimising distress to the bereaved. Here Dr Alexandra Pitman (UCL Psychiatry) writes about her research looking at how relatives of suicide victims respond to news, and speaks to others in the field.

Pharmacology - Feb 25

A better understanding of the lived experience of people with schizophrenia would enable clinicians to help patients live with their condition, alongside treating symptoms with medication and psychotherapy, say experts at the University of Birmingham.

Social Sciences - Feb 25

For the first time in more than 100 years life expectancy has failed to increase across the country, and for the poorest 10% of women it has actually declined, according to a new report from Sir Michael Marmot and the UCL Institute of Health Equity.


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Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 25.02.2020
400 Marsquakes detected by UK sensors in one year
400 Marsquakes detected by UK sensors in one year
The NASA InSight lander, which is supported by the UK Space Agency, has recorded 400 likely 'Marsquakes' in the first year of its mission. The seismic vibrations on Mars were detected by a set of silicon sensors developed in the UK for InSight's Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure (SEIS). Imperial College London, Oxford University, University of Bristol and STFC RAL Space worked in partnership, with £4 million in funding from the UK Space Agency, to develop three sensors which are sensitive enough to detect motion at sub-atomic scales.

Life Sciences - Materials Science - 25.02.2020
Fur-friendly 'wearable for pets' developed at Imperial
Fur-friendly ’wearable for pets’ developed at Imperial
Imperial College researchers London have invented a new health tracking sensor for pets and people that monitors vital signs through fur or clothing Our stretchy, flexible invention heralds a whole new type of sensor that can track the health of animals and humans alike over fur or clothing. Dr Firat Guder Department of Bioengineering The new type of sensor, which can detect vital signs like heart and breathing rates through fur and up to four layers of clothing, could help make everyday wearables for pets and livestock a reality.

Pharmacology - Health - 25.02.2020
Engaging with schizophrenia - experts argue for new approaches to treatment
A better understanding of the lived experience of people with schizophrenia would enable clinicians to help patients live with their condition, alongside treating symptoms with medication and psychotherapy, say experts at the University of Birmingham. According to researchers at the University, this approach would involve developing an understanding of ‘self-disturbance' in schizophrenia - in which patients' sense of connection to themselves and to their actions is disrupted.

Media - Social Sciences - 25.02.2020
Analysis: How do those bereaved by suicide respond to media reports?
Guidelines on reporting suicide are aimed at preventing further suicides and minimising distress to the bereaved. Here Dr Alexandra Pitman (UCL Psychiatry) writes about her research looking at how relatives of suicide victims respond to news, and speaks to others in the field. You are a junior reporter on a busy local newspaper.

Social Sciences - 25.02.2020
Life expectancy not improving for first time in 100 years
For the first time in more than 100 years life expectancy has failed to increase across the country, and for the poorest 10% of women it has actually declined, according to a new report from Sir Michael Marmot and the UCL Institute of Health Equity. 10 years on since Sir Marmot first published the Marmot Review, the new report confirms that over the last decade health inequalities have widened overall, and the amount of time people spend in poor health has increased since 2010.

Environment - Life Sciences - 24.02.2020
Shows how glacier algae creates dark zone at the margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet
Shows how glacier algae creates dark zone at the margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet
New research led by scientists from the University of Bristol has revealed new insights into how the microscopic algae that thrives along the edge of the Greenland Ice Sheet causes widespread darkening. This darkening is critically important as darker ice absorbs more sunlight energy and melts faster, accelerating the overall melting of the ice, which is the single largest contributor to global sea level rises.

Astronomy / Space Science - Electroengineering - 24.02.2020
Quakes, dust devils and midnight magnetic pulses: findings from a year on Mars
Quakes, dust devils and midnight magnetic pulses: findings from a year on Mars
InSight's Imperial-designed instrument has revealed that Mars trembles more often, but also more mildly, than expected. Detecting hundreds of marsquakes on a planet 140 million miles from Earth, using sensors developed in the UK, is an important achievement. Amanda Solloway UK Science Minister An international team of scientists led by NASA created Mars InSight , the first mission to study the deep interior of Mars , to generate unprecedented data about the planet's inner structure.

Physics - 24.02.2020
Watching magnetic nano 'tornadoes' in 3D
Watching magnetic nano ’tornadoes’ in 3D
Scientists have developed a three-dimensional imaging technique to observe complex behaviours in magnets, including fast-moving waves and 'tornadoes' thousands of times thinner than a human hair. We can now investigate the dynamics of new types of systems that could open up new applications we haven't even thought of Claire Donnelly The team, from the Universities of Cambridge and Glasgow in the UK and ETH Zurich and the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland, used their technique to observe how the magnetisation behaves, the first time this has been done in three dimensions.

Life Sciences - 24.02.2020
Gene loss more important in animal kingdom evolution than previously thought
Scientists have shown that some key points of animal evolution - like the ones leading to humans or insects - were associated with a large loss of genes in the genome. The study compared over 100 genomes to investigate what happened at the gene level during the evolution of animals after their origin.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.02.2020
Development of new blood test for GPs could help diagnose brain tumours earlier
The University of Bristol-led research project to develop an affordable, point of care blood test to diagnose brain tumours earlier using fluorescent carbon dots and nanophotonics will be headed by Dr Kathreena Kurian , Associate Professor in Brain Tumour Research and Dr Sabine Hauert , Senior Lecturer in Robotics in collaboration with co-investigators: Professors Carmen Galan and Richard Martin at the University of Bristol; Dr Neciah Dorh at FluoretiQ Limited and Dr Helen Bulbeck at Brainstrust.

Health - 22.02.2020
Two thirds of Covid-19 cases exported from mainland China may be undetected
A new report by Imperial scientists estimates that two thirds of Covid-19 cases exported from mainland China may be undetected. The Imperial scientists, based at the WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling within the MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis , and J-IDEA - Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics , released their 6th report on the COVID-19 outbreak on 21 February.

Health - 21.02.2020
Reveals link between high cholesterol levels and risk of aortic valve disease
Researchers from The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford have found that while having high cholesterol levels does not influence your risk of aortic or mitral valve regurgitation, it does increase your risk of developing another major heart valve disease - aortic stenosis.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.02.2020
African swine fever virus genome mapped
Researchers at UCL and the Pirbright Institute have mapped the expression of genes across the entire African swine fever virus (ASFV) genome, which has helped to establish their order of activation as well as uncovering new genes. The research, published in the Journal of Virology , could provide vital information for those developing vaccines and antiviral drugs to prevent the deadly pig disease caused by the virus.

Environment - Life Sciences - 21.02.2020
Himalayan wolf discovered to be a unique wolf adapted to harsh high altitude life
Himalayan wolf discovered to be a unique wolf adapted to harsh high altitude life
Researchers from the University of Oxford have discovered that the Himalayan wolf is a unique wolf characteristically adapted to the harsh life in the Asian high altitudes where low oxygen levels challenge all life forms. The Himalayan wolf is considered an ancient wolf as it evolved prior to the contemporary grey wolf which is found in large parts of North America and Eurasia.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.02.2020
Iron in brain shows cognitive decline in people with Parkinson’s
A cutting-edge MRI technique to detect iron deposits in different brain regions can track declines in thinking, memory and movement in people with Parkinson's disease, finds a new UCL-led study. The findings, published in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry , suggest that measures of brain iron might eventually help predict which people with Parkinson's will develop dementia.

Pharmacology - Health - 21.02.2020
Drug cocktail holds promise for spinal injuries
Drug cocktail holds promise for spinal injuries
Scientists have discovered a combination of two commonly available drugs that could help the body heal spinal fractures. The early-stage research in rats, by a group of scientists led by Imperial College London , revealed two existing medications can boost the body's own repair machinery, by triggering the release of stem cells from the bone marrow.

Pharmacology - Health - 20.02.2020
Some antibiotics linked with birth defects
Children of mothers prescribed macrolide antibiotics during the first trimester of pregnancy are at an increased risk of major birth defects when compared with penicillin, and the drugs should be used 'with caution' according to a new UCL study. The study, published today in The BMJ , aimed to assess the association between macrolides - a class of drugs used to treat common bacterial infections - and major malformations such as heart and genital defects, as well as four neurodevelopmental disorders (cerebral palsy, epilepsy, ADHD, and autism spectrum disorder) in children.

Life Sciences - 20.02.2020
Watching TV helps birds make better food choices
By watching videos of each other eating, blue tits and great tits can learn to avoid foods that taste disgusting and are potentially toxic, a new study has found. By watching others, blue tits and great tits can learn quickly and safely which prey are best to eat.

Environment - Transport - 19.02.2020
Researchers advise county council on net zero policy actions
A team of early-career researchers from the University of Cambridge are working with the county council to identify the best ways for Cambridgeshire to reach net zero emissions.

Pharmacology - Health - 19.02.2020
Podcast: Coronavirus vaccine, global progress report and fighting racism
In this edition: Join the race to develop a Covid-19 vaccine, check in on the Sustainable Development Goals, and discover how to argue with a racist. Play the complete podcast (above) You can catch the podcast on all your favourite platforms. Just click on any of the icons below. OR listen to individual chapters: News: Solar Orbiter lift-off and cutting contrails - We follow Imperial's instrument aboard the Solar Orbiter spacecraft as it takes its first data in space , and find out how altitude changes of just 2000 feet can cut the environmental impact of aeroplane contrails.
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