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Environment - Jan 21
Environment
Share this page - Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email - Common air pollutants from both urban and rural environments may be reducing the pollinating abilities of insects by preventing them from sniffing out the crops and wildflowers that depend on them, new research has shown.
Linguistics - Jan 20
Linguistics

Share this page - Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email - In languages spoken around the world, words describing rough surfaces are highly likely to feature a 'trilled /r/' sound - a linguistic pattern that stretches back over 6,000 years, a new study reveals.

Health - Jan 20

Our changing environment, as well as changing gene-environment interactions, could explain increasing rates of short-sightedness over time in the UK, reports a new study led by UCL researchers.

Health - Jan 20
Health

More than a third of care home residents and a quarter of care home staff in England showed evidence of infection with SARS-CoV-2 during the first two waves of the pandemic, according to a new study led by UCL researchers.

Life Sciences - Jan 19
Life Sciences

Harmful changes in supporting cells, called astrocytes, have been identified in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) by UCL and Francis Crick Institute researchers.


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Environment - 10:06
Air pollution significantly reduces pollination by confusing butterflies and bees
Air pollution significantly reduces pollination by confusing butterflies and bees
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email Common air pollutants from both urban and rural environments may be reducing the pollinating abilities of insects by preventing them from sniffing out the crops and wildflowers that depend on them, new research has shown.

Linguistics / Literature - 20.01.2022
'Rough' words feature a trill sound in languages around the globe - study
’Rough’ words feature a trill sound in languages around the globe - study
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email In languages spoken around the world, words describing rough surfaces are highly likely to feature a 'trilled /r/' sound - a linguistic pattern that stretches back over 6,000 years, a new study reveals. Language scientists first analysed words for 'rough' and 'smooth' in a worldwide sample of 332 spoken languages - discovering a strong link between the sounds of speech and the sense of touch, which has influenced the structure of modern languages.

Health - Pharmacology - 20.01.2022
More than a third of care home residents caught Covid-19 in early waves of pandemic
More than a third of care home residents caught Covid-19 in early waves of pandemic
More than a third of care home residents and a quarter of care home staff in England showed evidence of infection with SARS-CoV-2 during the first two waves of the pandemic, according to a new study led by UCL researchers. The study, published in The Lancet Healthy Longevity , looked at blood samples from nearly 5,000 residents (with a median age of 87) and staff (with a median age of 48) at 201 care homes across England between June 2020 and May 2021.

Health - 20.01.2022
Rates of short-sightedness increasing in the UK
Our changing environment, as well as changing gene-environment interactions, could explain increasing rates of short-sightedness over time in the UK, reports a new study led by UCL researchers. In a new paper published in PLOS One , researchers showed that, within the study, there were a higher number of people diagnosed with short-sightedness within the younger population than those born between 1939 and 1944.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.01.2022
Harmful changes in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Harmful changes in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Harmful changes in supporting cells, called astrocytes, have been identified in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) by UCL and Francis Crick Institute researchers. The two new publications, in Brain and Genome Research , suggests that the star-shaped astrocytes may be a key target for new ALS treatments.

Pharmacology - Health - 19.01.2022
New blood cancer gene defect can be treated with existing drugs
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email A defective gene normally found in blood cancers could be treated with drugs already available for cancers with similar gene defects, scientists at the University of Birmingham and Queen's University Belfast have revealed.

Health - Social Sciences - 19.01.2022
Review highlights risk factors associated with violence in schizophrenia
Review highlights risk factors associated with violence in schizophrenia
Researchers at Oxford University's Department of Psychiatry have found that people with schizophrenia and related disorders are at higher-than-average risk of perpetrating violence, but that the overall risk remains low (less than 1 in 20 in women, and less than 1 in 4 for men over a 35-year period for violent arrests and crimes).

Computer Science - Environment - 19.01.2022
Cambridge partners with Schmidt Futures in new software engineering network
Cambridge partners with Schmidt Futures in new software engineering network
Software engineers will bridge the gap between modern science and scalable complex software at four leading universities.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 19.01.2022
Manchester lab develop more sustainable and rapid route to future medicines
Manchester lab develop more sustainable and rapid route to future medicines
Researchers at The University of Manchester have developed a new powerful and sustainable method of combining enzymes found in nature with non-toxic synthetic catalysts to deliver important chemical building blocks needed for the production of pharmaceuticals as well as other valuable chemicals. New research published today describes the use of natural enzymes and earth-abundant and non-toxic transition metal-catalysts to forge organic molecules, creating what is known as an amide bond, in a more efficient and sustainable manner.

Health - Psychology - 19.01.2022
Depression and anxiety rose sharply over Christmas in the UK
Depression and anxiety rose sharply over Christmas in the UK
Levels of depression and anxiety rose sharply over December in the UK, especially among young adults, reaching similar levels to lockdown at the start of 2021, according to new findings from the Covid-19 Social Study led by UCL researchers. The research also found that confidence in devolved governments' handling of Covid-19 fell in England and Wales over the same period (between the end of November and start of January), but remained steady in Scotland.

Health - Psychology - 18.01.2022
Study highlights importance of bonding between young mental health patients and nurses
The relationships between young mental health patients and the nurses looking after them is an overlooked treatment in its own right, according to new research. The qualitative study of eight young people, eight family members and eight nursing staff by psychologists from The University of Manchester and Pennine Care NHS Foundation Trust is published in high profile journal PLOS ONE.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.01.2022
'Off target' effects of drugs used for autoimmune disorders needs better treatment strategy
’Off target’ effects of drugs used for autoimmune disorders needs better treatment strategy
New therapies for autoimmune rheumatic diseases (AIRDs) that are designed to better regulate lipid (fat) metabolism, could significantly reduce the harmful side-effects caused by conventional treatments, finds a new large-scale review led by UCL researchers. AIRDs affect millions globally and include rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and Sjögren's syndrome - all with high rates of morbidity.

Health - 17.01.2022
Curbing COVID-19 in schools: Cambridge scientists support CO2 monitor rollout
Curbing COVID-19 in schools: Cambridge scientists support CO2 monitor rollout
UK schools have received more than 300,000 CO2 monitors as part of a government initiative to reduce COVID-19 spread in classrooms. The monitors empower teachers to strike a balance between good ventilation and warmth during winter Paul Linden Scientists from Cambridge, Surrey and Imperial College London are supporting the rollout of portable monitors to UK schools as part of project CO-TRACE.

Economics / Business - 17.01.2022
Working in isolated environments enables culture of bullying among elite chefs
Bullying, violence and aggressive behaviour among chefs employed in fine dining restaurants is enabled by their working environments, research from Cardiff University has found. The study shows how working in closed, hidden away kitchen environments left chefs feeling isolated and led to a sense that they could act in ways that would not be possible elsewhere.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.01.2022
Link between brain cell development and risk of schizophrenia
Scientists from Cardiff University have discovered new links between the breakdown in brain cell development and the risk of schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. Genetic risk factors are known to disrupt brain development in a number of these disorders, but little is known about which aspects of this process are affected.

Environment - 13.01.2022
Damaging microplastic particles stay trapped in rivers
Damaging microplastic particles stay trapped in rivers
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email Swirling river waters can trap lightweight microplastics that otherwise might be expected to float - depositing them in riverbeds where it can take up to seven years to transport them just a kilometre further towards the ocean, a new study reveals.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 13.01.2022
'Slushy' magma ocean led to formation of the Moon's crust
’Slushy’ magma ocean led to formation of the Moon’s crust
Scientists have shown how the freezing of a 'slushy' ocean of magma may be responsible for the composition of the Moon's crust. Cooling of the early magma ocean drove such vigorous convection that crystals remained suspended as a slurry, like the crystals in a slushy machine. Jerome Neufeld The scientists, from the University of Cambridge and the Ecole normale supérieure de Lyon, have proposed a new model of crystallisation, where crystals remained suspended in liquid magma over hundreds of millions of years as the lunar 'slush' froze and solidified.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 13.01.2022
Promising novel treatment for Dry Eye Disease revealed by new research
Promising novel treatment for Dry Eye Disease revealed by new research
The University of Manchester, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Link Biologics Limited today announced that promising preclinical data on the treatment of Dry Eye Disease using a novel protein biological drug, Link_TSG6, have been published in the peer-reviewed journal, Ocular Surface .

Social Sciences - 13.01.2022
Greenspace outside prison walls has a positive effect on prisoner wellbeing
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email Prisoners who are incarcerated in buildings located in green areas are less likely to engage in self-harming or violent behaviours, new research shows. According to a study by researchers at the Universities of Birmingham and Utrecht, green areas outside prisons can have a positive effect on wellbeing, alongside the proven positive effects of greenspace inside the prison walls.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.01.2022
Mosquitoes’ mating game discovery provides new clues to combat malaria
Male mosquitoes beat their wings faster when swarming at sunset to better detect females and increase their chance of reproducing, finds a novel study led by UCL scientists. Published in  Science Advances , the findings provide a vital new insight into how mosquitoes, driven by their internal circadian clock, combine changes in wing beats with their acute auditory senses to successfully mate.
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