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Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 19.03.2024
Researchers uncover remarkable archive of ancient human brains
A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Oxford has challenged previously held views that brain preservation in the archaeological record is extremely rare. The team carried out the largest study to date of the global archaeological literature about preserved human brains to compile an archive that exceeds 20-fold the number of brains previously compiled.

Environment - History / Archeology - 01.03.2024
Seeing the wood for the trees: using hazelnuts to reconstruct ancient woodlands
Seeing the wood for the trees: using hazelnuts to reconstruct ancient woodlands
Humans in northern Europe have been snacking on hazelnuts - a key accessible source of energy -for at least 12,000 years. Now, a study led by the University of Oxford has shown that it is possible to analyse the carbon isotope values of hazelnuts found at archaeological sites to reveal what the places humans lived in millennia ago looked like.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 26.02.2024
First DNA study of ancient Eastern Arabians reveals malaria adaptation
The first DNA study of the ancient population of Eastern Arabia sheds new light on their lives People living in ancient Eastern Arabia appear to have developed resistance to malaria following the appearance of agriculture in the region around five thousand years ago, a new study reveals. DNA analysis of the remains of four individuals from Tylos-period Bahrain (300 BCE to 600 CE) - the first ancient genomes from Eastern Arabia - revealed the malaria-protective G6PD Mediterranean mutation in three samples.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 08.02.2024
Ice cores provide first documentation of rapid Antarctic ice loss in the past
Ice cores provide first documentation of rapid Antarctic ice loss in the past
Researchers from the University of Cambridge and the British Antarctic Survey have uncovered the first direct evidence that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet shrunk suddenly and dramatically at the end of the Last Ice Age, around 8,000 years ago. The evidence, contained within an ice core, shows that in one location the ice sheet thinned by 450 metres - that's more than the height of the Empire State Building - in just under 200 years.

History / Archeology - 04.01.2024
Evidence of ancient medieval feasting rituals uncovered in grounds of historic property
Evidence of ancient medieval feasting rituals uncovered in grounds of historic property
An early medieval cemetery has been discovered within the grounds of Fonmon Castle, near Barry, South Wales. Archaeologists from Cardiff University's School of History, Archaeology and Religion carried out a dig in the summer, with further radiocarbon dating and analysis revealing the full extent of their find.

History / Archeology - Physics - 19.12.2023
Mesopotamian bricks unveil the strength of Earth's ancient magnetic field
Mesopotamian bricks unveil the strength of Earth’s ancient magnetic field
Ancient bricks inscribed with the names of Mesopotamian kings have yielded important insights into a mysterious anomaly in Earth's magnetic field 3,000 years ago, according to a new study involving UCL researchers. The research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) , describes how changes in the Earth's magnetic field imprinted on iron oxide grains within ancient clay bricks, and how scientists were able to reconstruct these changes from the names of the kings inscribed on the bricks.

Environment - History / Archeology - 19.12.2023
Human activity responsible for mass bird extinctions
Humans have wiped out around 1,400 bird species - twice as many as previously thought - with major implications for the ongoing biodiversity crisis, a new study involving UCL researchers has found. Many of the world's islands were previously untouched paradises, but the arrival of people to places like Hawaii, Tonga and the Azores led to far-reaching impacts including deforestation, overhunting and the introduction of invasive species.

History / Archeology - 23.11.2023
1,400-year-old temple discovered at Suffolk royal settlement
1,400-year-old temple discovered at Suffolk royal settlement
A possibly pre-Christian temple from the time of the East Anglian Kings, some 1,400 years ago, has been found at Rendlesham, near Sutton Hoo in Suffolk, by a team of archaeologists led by UCL researchers. The discovery was made over the summer by Suffolk County Council's Rendlesham Revealed community archaeology project.

History / Archeology - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.10.2023
Our European ancestors ate seaweed and freshwater plants
Study reveals our European ancestors ate seaweed and freshwater plants Published: 17 October 2023 Researchers say they have found "definitive" archaeological evidence that seaweeds and other local freshwater plants were eaten in the Mesolithic, through the Neolithic transition to farming and into the Early Middle Ages.

History / Archeology - 11.09.2023
Archaeologists reveal largest palaeolithic cave art site in Eastern Iberia
Archaeologists reveal largest palaeolithic cave art site in Eastern Iberia
Archaeologists have discovered a major Palaeolithic cave art site, arguably the most important found on the Eastern Iberian Coast in Europe. Over a hundred ancient paintings and engravings, thought to be at least 24,000 years old, have been found in a 500 metre-long cave in 'Cova Dones' or 'Cueva Dones' - a site located in Millares near Valencia in Spain.

History / Archeology - Environment - 06.09.2023
Complete Neolithic cursus on the Isle of Arran
Complete Neolithic cursus on the Isle of Arran
Researchers discover complete Neolithic cursus on the Isle of Arran A leading team of researchers have discovered what is believed to be a complete Neolithic cursus set within a rich prehistoric landscape on the Isle of Arran, Scotland. A leading team of researchers have discovered what is believed to be a complete Neolithic cursus set within a rich prehistoric landscape on the Isle of Arran, Scotland.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 21.08.2023
Researchers extract ancient DNA from a 2,900-year-old clay brick, revealing a time capsule of plant life
University of Oxford researchers have contributed to the first successful extraction of ancient DNA from a 2,900 year-old clay brick. The analysis, published today in Nature Scientific Reports , provides a fascinating insight into the diversity of plant species cultivated at that time and place, and could open the way to similar studies on clay material from different sites and time periods.

History / Archeology - 02.08.2023
What did the Romans do for us? Aqueducts and the art of Roman water management
While 21  century water companies struggle to maintain clean, fresh supplies, new research today from an international team led by Oxford geoarchaeologist Dr Güel Sürmelihindi , reveals that, some 2,000 years ago, Roman water engineers were keeping up a regular programme of managing and maintaining the ancient water systems.

History / Archeology - Environment - 06.07.2023
Giant stone artefacts found on rare Ice Age site in Kent
Giant stone artefacts found on rare Ice Age site in Kent
Researchers at the UCL Institute of Archaeology have discovered some of the largest early prehistoric stone tools in Britain. The excavations, which took place in Kent and were commissioned in advance of development of the Maritime Academy School in Frindsbury, revealed prehistoric artefacts in deep Ice Age sediments preserved on a hillside above the Medway Valley.

History / Archeology - Environment - 13.06.2023
Walls along River Nile reveal ancient form of hydraulic engineering
Walls along River Nile reveal ancient form of hydraulic engineering
An international team of researchers who discovered a vast network of stone walls along the River Nile in Egypt and Sudan say these massive 'river groynes' reveal an exceptionally long-lived form of hydraulic engineering in the Nile Valley, and shed light on connections between ancient Nubia and Egypt.

History / Archeology - 09.06.2023
Trinity College prayer book belonged to Thomas Cromwell
Trinity College prayer book belonged to Thomas Cromwell
The Hardouyn Hours, a jewelled fifteenth-century prayer book in Trinity College Library belonged to Thomas Cromwell, chief minister to King Henry VIII, new research has found. The most exciting Cromwell discovery in a generation - if not more. Tracy Borman Hever Castle curator, Alison Palmer, recognised the bejewelled, silver gilt binding of Trinity's Book of Hours from the famous portrait of Thomas Cromwell painted by Hans Holbein the Younger in 1532-3, which hangs in the Frick Collection in New York.

History / Archeology - Health - 26.05.2023
Early toilets reveal dysentery in Old Testament Jerusalem
Early toilets reveal dysentery in Old Testament Jerusalem
Study of 2,500-year-old latrines from the biblical Kingdom of Judah shows the ancient faeces within contain Giardia - a parasite that can cause dysentery. Toilets with cesspits from this time are relatively rare and were usually made only for the elite Piers Mitchell A new analysis of ancient faeces taken from two Jerusalem latrines dating back to the biblical Kingdom of Judah has uncovered traces of a single-celled microorganism Giardia duodenalis - a common cause of debilitating diarrhoea in humans.

Environment - History / Archeology - 09.05.2023
Tooth enamel provides clues to hunter-gatherer lifestyle of Neanderthals
Tooth enamel provides clues to hunter-gatherer lifestyle of Neanderthals
A study by an international team of researchers, led by the University of Southampton, has given an intriguing glimpse of the hunting habits and diets of Neanderthals and other humans living in western Europe. The scientists examined chemical properties locked inside tooth enamel to piece together how pre-historic people lived off the land around the Almonda Cave system, near Torres Novas in central Portugal almost 100 thousand years ago.

Environment - History / Archeology - 26.04.2023
Prolonged droughts likely spelled the end for Indus megacities
Prolonged droughts likely spelled the end for Indus megacities
New research involving Cambridge University has found evidence - locked into an ancient stalagmite from a cave in the Himalayas - of a series of severe and lengthy droughts which may have upturned the Bronze Age Indus Civilization.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 30.03.2023
Ancient African empires’ impact on migration revealed by genetics
Traces of ancient empires that stretched across Africa remain in the DNA of people living on the continent, reveals a new genetics study led by UCL researchers. Published in Science Advances , the collaboration between UCL geneticists working alongside anthropologists, archaeologists, historians and linguists in Africa and beyond found evidence for when different peoples intermixed across the continent.
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