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Health - Psychology - 01.02.2023
Link between talking therapy and lower rates of dementia assessed
Link between talking therapy and lower rates of dementia assessed
Using talking therapies to effectively treat depression in adults over the age of 65 may be clinically linked with slightly reduced rates of future dementia diagnosis, finds a new analysis of health data led by UCL researchers. In this first-of-its-kind study, published in  Psychological Medicine  and funded by the Alzheimer's Society, researchers assessed whether psychological therapies, such as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), used to treat depression could play a role in dementia risk reduction.

Psychology - 01.02.2023
Moderate alcohol intoxication does not impair recall of sexual assault
Women are able to recall details of sexual assault and rape with accuracy, even if they have drunk - or expected to drink - moderate amounts of alcohol. A study conducted at the University of Birmingham demonstrated that women who had drunk alcohol up to the legal limit for driving were able to recall details of an assault in a hypothetical scenario, including details of activities to which they had, and had not, consented.

Health - Psychology - 24.01.2023
Generational inequalities in mental health accelerated during Covid-19 pandemic
Generational inequalities in mental health accelerated during Covid-19 pandemic
Core symptoms of anxiety and depression were more common among younger generations compared to older age groups during the COVID-19 outbreak - with the gap between young and old widening further during the pandemic, according to a new study by UCL and King's College London. Published today in Psychological Medicine, the study explores data from 26,772 people living in the UK across five different birth cohort studies - following those born in 1946, 1958, 1970, 1989-90 and 2000-02.

Pharmacology - Psychology - 23.01.2023
Scientists explain emotional 'blunting' caused by common antidepressants
Scientists explain emotional ’blunting’ caused by common antidepressants
Scientists have worked out why common anti-depressants cause around a half of users to feel emotionally -blunted-. In a study published today, they show that the drugs affect reinforcement learning, an important behavioural process that allows us to learn from our environment. According to the NHS, more than 8.3 million patients in England received an antidepressant drug in 2021/22.

Pharmacology - Psychology - 17.01.2023
New study tests impact of coming off antidepressants on mood and thinking patterns
University psychologists aiming to improve help for people withdrawing from antidepressants want volunteers to come forward to participate in the new study. New research being led by a team of psychologists at the University of Bath hopes to provide evidence to improve the clinical care of people in the process of withdrawing from antidepressants.

Psychology - Health - 16.01.2023
The link between mental health and ADHD is strong - so why aren't we paying attention?
The link between mental health and ADHD is strong - so why aren’t we paying attention?
Adults with high levels of ADHD symptoms are more likely to have anxiety and depression than adults with high levels of autistic traits, new research finds. Adults with high levels of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms are more likely to experience anxiety and depression than adults with high levels of autistic traits, according to new research led by psychologists at the University of Bath.

Psychology - Health - 11.01.2023
Childhood maltreatment linked with multiple mental health problems
Experiencing abuse or neglect as a child can cause multiple mental health problems, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The research, published in the American Journal of Psychiatry , seeks to examine the causal effects of childhood maltreatment on mental health by accounting for other genetic and environmental risk factors, such as a family history of mental illness and socioeconomic disadvantage.

Psychology - 26.12.2022
Females perform better than males on a 'theory of mind' test across 57 countries
Females perform better than males on a ’theory of mind’ test across 57 countries
Females, on average, are better than males at putting themselves in others- shoes and imagining what the other person is thinking or feeling, suggests a new study of over 300,000 people in 57 countries. Our results provide some of the first evidence that the well-known phenomenon - that females are on average more empathic than males - is present in wide range of countries across the globe David Greenberg Researchers found that females, on averag

Health - Psychology - 23.12.2022
COVID-19 pandemic increased the vulnerability of people living with obesity
COVID-19 pandemic increased the vulnerability of people living with obesity
The COVID-19 pandemic may have left people living with obesity more vulnerable to the cost-of-living crisis, warns a study led by UCL researchers. Adults with obesity surveyed in the study reported that their mental health - which is known to be associated with weight gain - had deteriorated between the end of the UK's first COVID-19 lockdown in July 2020 and September 2021.

Health - Psychology - 09.12.2022
Healthcare workers in England experience PTSD at twice the rate of the general public
Healthcare workers in England experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at twice the rate of the general public, according to a new study co-led by UCL researchers. The research, published in The Lancet Psychiatry, was conducted as part of a wider study to establish a more accurate prevalence of mental disorders within the NHS workforce.

Health - Psychology - 08.12.2022
First-wave COVID-19 linked to long-term depressive symptoms
People who reported contracting COVID-19 early in the pandemic were twice as likely to experience depressive symptoms 13 months later than those who did not, new research has found. Those who reported having COVID in early 2020 were also 1.67 times more likely to experience clinically meaningful levels of anxiety after 13 months, than those who avoided COVID-19 in the same time period.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 06.12.2022
New study highlights terms most favoured by autistic people across the globe
Autistic people have strong preferences for terms to describe autism, with unpopular terms including 'having autism' or having an 'impairment' or 'disorder'. Researchers from across the U21 Autism Research Network , led by a team at the University of Birmingham, carried out a survey of over 650 English-speaking autistic adults across the globe to explore their linguistic preferences.

Music - Psychology - 02.12.2022
Playing the piano boosts brain processing power and helps lift the blues - study
A randomised control trial led by Bath psychologists shows the positive effects learning to play music for just a few weeks has on cognitive abilities. A new study published by researchers at the University of Bath demonstrates the positive impact learning to play a musical instrument has on the brain's ability to process sights and sounds, and shows how it can also help to lift a blue mood.

Psychology - Health - 17.11.2022
Many adolescents game a lot without negative effects on their wellbeing
A new study published by University of Oxford researchers in an open-access journal, JMIR Pediatrics and Parenting , shows that although many school-age adolescents are spending considerable time gaming, it is not having a negative impact on the wellbeing. The OxWell Student Survey is one of the largest school surveys of adolescent health and wellbeing in England.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 15.11.2022
Feeling poorer than your friends in early adolescence is associated with worse mental health
How rich or poor young people think they are compared to their friendship group is linked to wellbeing and even bullying during the shift between childhood and teenage years. Belonging is particularly important for well-being and psychosocial functioning during adolescence Blanca Piera Pi-Sunyer Young people who believe they come from poorer backgrounds than their friends are more likely to have lower self-esteem and be victims of bullying than those who feel financially equal to the rest of their peer group, according to a new study from psychologists at the University of Cambridge.

Health - Psychology - 03.11.2022
Problem drinking linked to increased risk of suicide and self-harm
Problem drinking linked to increased risk of suicide and self-harm
Problematic alcohol use is associated with increased odds of suicide or self-harm, according to a new study led by UCL researchers. The study, published in BJPsych Open , did not identify a clear association with levels of alcohol consumption and risk of suicide or self-harm, other than among those with 'probable dependence' (the highest consumption level); rather, they identified signs of alcohol negatively impacting people's lives as risk factors.

Psychology - Health - 01.11.2022
Mental health burden of trauma in childhood
A new study published in The Lancet Psychiatry from Bath psychologists highlights the far-reaching effects of trauma in children. Findings from a major birth cohort study in Brazil suggest that children exposed to life threatening or horrifying events, such as witnessing someone die, or experiencing serious injury or sexual violence, are almost twice as likely to develop psychiatric disorders.

Psychology - Health - 26.10.2022
Autistic people are more likely to experience depression and anxiety during pregnancy
Autistic people are more likely to experience depression and anxiety during pregnancy
Autistic people are more vulnerable to depression and anxiety during pregnancy, according to new research from the University of Cambridge. The results are published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders and have important implications for supporting autistic people during pregnancy. This study suggests that autistic people are more vulnerable to mental health difficulties during pregnancy.

Health - Psychology - 24.10.2022
Anti-inflammatory drug could help people with PTSD forget traumatic events
The tablet form of the stress hormone cortisol could accelerate the process of forgetting intrusive memories, when given immediately after a traumatic event, finds a new study by UCL researchers. The research, published in Translational Psychiatry , found that hydrocortisone (30mg) - an anti-inflammatory drug used to treat conditions such as arthritis - acts to weaken the emotions that underly painful memories, such as those experienced in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Psychology - 18.10.2022
Opinion: Social media - how to protect your mental health
Opinion: Social media - how to protect your mental health
Writing in The Conversation, Dr Ruth Plackett (UCL Epidemiology & Health) synthesises the results of research looking into how to best protect one's mental health while navigating the volatile social media landscape. The recent inquest into the death of British teenager Molly Russell in 2017 has concluded that the 14-year-old "died from an act of self harm while suffering from depression and the negative effects of online content".
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