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Life Sciences - Health - 06.02.2023
Rare genetic disease may protect Ashkenazi Jews against TB
Scientists may have solved the question of why Ashkenazi Jews are significantly more susceptible to a rare genetic disorder known as Gaucher disease - and the answer may help settle the debate about whether they are less susceptible to tuberculosis (TB). We-d unknowingly landed in a debate that's been going on in human genetics for decades: are Ashkenazi Jews somehow less likely to get TB infection? The answer appears to be yes.

Health - Psychology - 06.02.2023
New home-based self-help psychological therapy reduces anxiety and depression in people with heart disease
A study led by Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust (GMMH) and the University of Manchester (UoM), and funded by the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) has found that a psychological therapy called Metacognitive Therapy (MCT) can reduce symptoms of depression, anxiety and posttraumatic stress in heart disease patients when delivered in a self-help format.

Health - Pharmacology - 03.02.2023
Kisspeptin hormone injection could treat low sex drive in women and men
The hormone kisspeptin could be used to treat women and men distressed by their low sexual desire, according to two new studies. The studies, both published in JAMA Network Open , found that giving kisspeptin can boost sexual responses in women and men who have hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) - a condition characterised by low sexual desire that is distressing to the individual.

Health - Career - 02.02.2023
Levelling Up goals should be assessed through self-reported health measures
Links between an area's health and employment figures are stronger when looking at self-rated health measures, compared with life expectancy or mortality indicators, finds a new study by UCL researchers. The research, published in BMC Public Health, sought to evaluate which health indicator is most closely linked to labour market outcomes, such as not being in paid work, working hours (i.e.

Health - Pharmacology - 02.02.2023
Combined steroid and statin treatment could reduce ’accelerated ageing’ in preterm babies, study in rats suggests
Potentially life-saving steroids commonly given to preterm babies also increase the risk of long-term cardiovascular problems, but a new study in rats has found that if given in conjunction with statins, their positive effects remain while the potential negative side-effects are -weeded out-. "We are not saying to stop using glucocorticoids, as they are clearly a life-saving treatment.

Health - Psychology - 01.02.2023
Link between talking therapy and lower rates of dementia assessed
Link between talking therapy and lower rates of dementia assessed
Using talking therapies to effectively treat depression in adults over the age of 65 may be clinically linked with slightly reduced rates of future dementia diagnosis, finds a new analysis of health data led by UCL researchers. In this first-of-its-kind study, published in  Psychological Medicine  and funded by the Alzheimer's Society, researchers assessed whether psychological therapies, such as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), used to treat depression could play a role in dementia risk reduction.

Health - 01.02.2023
Ultra-processed foods may be linked to increased risk of cancer
Higher consumption of ultra-processed foods may be linked to an increased risk of developing and dying from cancer, an Imperial-led study suggests. Researchers from Imperial's School of Public Health have produced the most comprehensive assessment to date of the association between ultra-processed foods and the risk of developing cancers.

Health - Veterinary - 01.02.2023
Rottweilers at greatest risk of cranial cruciate ligament rupture
A new study from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) explores the reasons for cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture in dogs in the UK, as well as the factors influencing how it is managed clinically. The research also identifies which breeds are most at risk of CCL, with this list including popular breeds such as Rottweilers, Bichon Frise and West Highland White Terriers.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.02.2023
The way genes are switched on in one-cell embryos may resemble the trigger for cancer
The way genes are switched on in one-cell embryos may resemble the trigger for cancer
Bath embryologists find that after fertilisation, mouse embryo genes are switched on in a pre-set order and that the triggers responsible are linked to cancer. When an embryo is formed, its genes - donated by a fertilising sperm and egg - are silent. Somehow, at an early stage of development, embryo genes must be switched on.

Health - 31.01.2023
Three or more concussions linked with worse brain function in later life
Experiencing three or more concussions is linked with worsened brain function in later life, according to new research. The study - the largest of its kind - also found having just one moderate-to-severe concussion, or traumatic brain injury (TBI), can have a long-term impact on brain function, including memory.

Health - Pharmacology - 30.01.2023
New study into Tuberculosis membrane molecules will aid drug delivery
A new method to aid in the development of antibiotics for tuberculosis (TB) infections has been devised. TB rivals covid-19 as the biggest infectious disease killer of humans, claiming millions of lives each year. Now, ground-breaking research from the Universities of Warwick and Toulouse has identified a new method to help tackle this global issue.

Health - 30.01.2023
Living in rural England linked to better memory performance
Living in rural England linked to better memory performance
People aged 50 and over who live in rural England do better in memory tests than counterparts who live in English towns and cities, according to a new study led by UCL researchers. The study, published in the Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences, looked at the results of memory tests taken by two nationally representative population samples, whose participants were aged 50 and over, in England and China.

Health - 27.01.2023
Continued ear wax services crucial, say Manchester researchers
A new study by University of Manchester audiologists has highlighted the difficulties people face with impacted ear wax. The findings are published in the British Journal of General Practice as more and more people face the prospect of ear wax removal services being discontinued at their GP surgeries.

Pharmacology - Health - 27.01.2023
New blood test could save lives of heart attack victims
New blood test could save lives of heart attack victims
Researchers from the Herring group in Oxford's Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics have developed a blood test that measures stress hormone levels after heart attacks. The test - costing just £10 - could ensure patients receive timely life-saving treatment. Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death in the UK.

Health - Pharmacology - 27.01.2023
Loyalty card data could help identify ovarian cancer symptoms sooner
Loyalty card data could help identify ovarian cancer symptoms sooner
Loyalty card data on over-the-counter medicine purchases could help spot ovarian cancer cases earlier, finds a new study involving UCL researchers. The first-of-its kind study, published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance , found that pain and indigestion medication purchases were higher in women who were subsequently diagnosed with ovarian cancer, compared to women who did not have ovarian cancer.

Career - Health - 27.01.2023
People with arthritis 20% less likely to be in work
The typical person living with arthritis in the UK is 20% less likely to be in work than their equivalent without the condition, new research shows. And the most striking finding was that non-university educated women aged 60-plus are at least 37% less likely to be in work if they have arthritis, compared to matched individuals without the condition.

Health - Economics / Business - 26.01.2023
Sugary drinks tax may have prevented over 5,000 cases of obesity a year in year six girls alone
Sugary drinks tax may have prevented over 5,000 cases of obesity a year in year six girls alone
The introduction of the soft drinks industry levy - the -sugary drinks tax in England was followed by a drop in the number of cases of obesity among older primary school children, according to Cambridge researchers. Taking into account current trends in obesity, their estimates suggest that around 5,000 cases of obesity per year may have been prevented in year six girls alone.

Health - Pharmacology - 26.01.2023
Loyalty card data could help to identify ovarian cancer symptoms sooner
Loyalty card data on over-the-counter medicine purchases could help spot ovarian cancer cases earlier, an Imperial College London-led study suggests. The study of almost 300 women found that pain and indigestion medication purchases were higher in women who were subsequently diagnosed with ovarian cancer, compared to women who did not have ovarian cancer.

Health - 26.01.2023
Gambling advertising restrictions could reduce harm 
Researchers from the University of Sheffield and Glasgow explored the relationship between exposure to gambling advertising and attitudes, intentions and behaviours which may be associated with an increased risk of gambling related harms Evidence showed the impact on children, young people and those already at risk from current gambling activity are more likely to be influenced by gambling advertising Gambling-related harms represent a significa

Health - Life Sciences - 25.01.2023
Research by the RVC explores link between parasitic infection and stunted growth in children
Analysis of current literature and research by the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) has revealed there are various pathways which connect parasitic infection to stunting. The findings suggest that human exposure to parasitic disease from conception through to two years of age may contribute to childhood stunting.
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