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Life Sciences - Health - 06.02.2023
Rare genetic disease may protect Ashkenazi Jews against TB
Scientists may have solved the question of why Ashkenazi Jews are significantly more susceptible to a rare genetic disorder known as Gaucher disease - and the answer may help settle the debate about whether they are less susceptible to tuberculosis (TB). We-d unknowingly landed in a debate that's been going on in human genetics for decades: are Ashkenazi Jews somehow less likely to get TB infection? The answer appears to be yes.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 04.02.2023
Artificial Intelligence to personalise cancer patient treatments
Artificial Intelligence to personalise cancer patient treatments
Sussex researchers use Artificial Intelligence to personalise cancer patient treatments Researchers at the University of Sussex are using Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology to analyse different types of cancer cells to understand different gene dependencies, and to identify genes that are critical to a cell's survival.

Environment - Life Sciences - 03.02.2023
Rates of hatching failure in birds almost twice as high as previously estimated
New study from the University of Sheffield, IoZ, and UCL found more than one in six bird eggs fail to hatch Hatching failure increases as species decline, so the new research could be used to predict what species are most at risk of extinction Findings reveal that hatching failure is a much bigger problem for captive threatened species, with almost half (43 per cent) of their eggs failing to hatch The work provides evidence that conservation man

Life Sciences - Health - 01.02.2023
The way genes are switched on in one-cell embryos may resemble the trigger for cancer
The way genes are switched on in one-cell embryos may resemble the trigger for cancer
Bath embryologists find that after fertilisation, mouse embryo genes are switched on in a pre-set order and that the triggers responsible are linked to cancer. When an embryo is formed, its genes - donated by a fertilising sperm and egg - are silent. Somehow, at an early stage of development, embryo genes must be switched on.

Life Sciences - 26.01.2023
COVID has increased trust in genetics
A survey of over 2,000 British adults finds that trust in genetics is high and went up significantly during the pandemic. It also finds that there is a hunger for more coverage of genetics. These results really challenge us to double our efforts. We need to rise to the new opportunity and the challenge created by the outcomes of this survey.

Life Sciences - Physics - 25.01.2023
Long-term memory in 2D nanofluidic channels
Published in Science , a collaboration between teams from the National Graphene Institute (NGI) at The University of Manchester , and the É cole Normale Sup é rieure (ENS), Paris, demonstrated the Hebbian learning in artificial nanochannels, where the channels showed short and long term memory. Hebbian learning is a technical term introduced in 1949 by Donald Hebb, describing the process of learning by repetitively doing an action.

Life Sciences - 25.01.2023
Covid-19 pandemic has increased trust in genetics
A survey of over 2,000 British adults, conducted in part by a UCL researcher, finds that trust in genetics is high, and went up significantly during the pandemic. The survey findings feature in a report published online by the Genetics Society and have also fed into a peer-reviewed research paper, published in PLOS Biology , which reports that people with more extreme attitudes towards science have the most self-confidence in their understanding of science.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.01.2023
Research by the RVC explores link between parasitic infection and stunted growth in children
Analysis of current literature and research by the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) has revealed there are various pathways which connect parasitic infection to stunting. The findings suggest that human exposure to parasitic disease from conception through to two years of age may contribute to childhood stunting.

Life Sciences - 24.01.2023
Polygamous birds have fewer harmful mutations
Polygamous birds have fewer harmful mutations
New study led by the Milner Centre for Evolution suggests polygamy increases the efficiency of natural selection by reducing harmful mutations. Bird species that breed with several sexual partners have fewer harmful mutations, according to a study led by the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath.

Life Sciences - 24.01.2023
Attitude towards science depends on what you think you know, rather than what you actually know
Attitude towards science depends on what you think you know, rather than what you actually know
Survey of over 2,000 adults in the UK identifies potential pitfalls of science communication. Why do people hold highly variable attitudes towards well-evidenced science? For many years researchers focused on what people know about science, thinking that -to know science is to love it-. But do people who think they know science actually know science?

Life Sciences - Health - 23.01.2023
DNA sequencing method lifts ’veil’ from genome black box
Many life-saving drugs directly interact with DNA to treat diseases such as cancer, but scientists have struggled to detect how and why they work - until now. In a paper published in the journal Nature Biotechnology , University of Cambridge researchers have outlined a new DNA sequencing method that can detect where and how small molecule drugs interact with the targeted genome.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.01.2023
Split-second of evolutionary cellular change could have led to mammals
A newly-published hypothesis, led by a UCL researcher, suggests a momentary leap in a single species on a single day millions of years ago might ultimately have led to the arrival of mammals - and therefore humans. Published in the Journal of Cell Science , Professor John Martin (UCL Division of Medicine) thinks a single genetic molecular event (inheritable epigenetic change) in an egg-laying animal may have resulted in the first formation of blood platelets, approximately 220 million years ago.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.01.2023
Wearable tech, AI and clinical teams join to change the face of trial monitoring
A multi-disciplinary team of researchers has developed a way to monitor the progression of movement disorders using motion capture technology and AI.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.01.2023
Wearable tech, AI and clinical teams combine to change the face of clinical trial monitoring
Wearable tech, AI and clinical teams combine to change the face of clinical trial monitoring
A multi-disciplinary team of researchers, involving several UCL scientists, has developed a way to monitor the progression of movement disorders using motion capture technology and AI.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.01.2023
Brain health ’Check-in’ tool to help reduce dementia risk
A free new digital tool has been launched by Alzheimer's Research UK, supported by evidence from UCL researchers, to help people keep their brain healthy and reduce their dementia risk. Only 2% of the public are doing everything they can to keep their brains healthy, according to new figures released by the charity.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.01.2023
Role of lymphatic system in bone healing revealed
Role of lymphatic system in bone healing revealed
It was previously assumed that bones lacked lymphatic vessels, but new research from the MRC Human Immunology Unit  at Oxford's MRC Weatherall Institute for Molecular Medicine  not only locates them within bone tissue, but demonstrates their role in bone and blood cell regeneration and reveals changes associated with aging.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.01.2023
How post-feeding breasts bounce back from the brink of death to kick-start milk production
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered a protein that kick-starts milk production after breastfeeding has paused The team found the Rac1 protein which turns milk-secreting cells into cannibalistic cell eaters to clear up dead cells and remove surplus milk, also kick-starts milk production after temporary pauses The groundbreaking study provides new insights into how breast cancer cells might acquire resistance to cell death

Health - Life Sciences - 20.01.2023
How post-feeding breasts bounce back from the brink of death to kickstart milk production
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered a protein that kickstarts milk production after breastfeeding has paused The team found the Rac1 protein which turns milk-secreting cells into cannibalistic cell eaters to clear up dead cells and remove surplus milk, also kickstarts milk production after temporary pauses The groundbreaking study provides new insights into how breast cancer cells might acquire resistance to cell death in

Health - Life Sciences - 16.01.2023
Gone fishing: highly accurate test for common respiratory viruses uses DNA as ’bait’
A new test that -fishes- for multiple respiratory viruses at once using single strands of DNA as -bait-, and gives highly accurate results in under an hour, has been developed by Cambridge researchers. Good diagnostics are the key to good treatments Filip Bo¨ković The test uses DNA -nanobait- to detect the most common respiratory viruses - including influenza, rhinovirus, RSV and COVID-19 - at the same time.

Life Sciences - 09.01.2023
Early dinosaur skulls show how meat-eaters became vegetarian
Early dinosaur skulls show how meat-eaters became vegetarian
The skulls of early dinosaurs are helping scientists understand how some of the earliest herbivores may have evolved different ways of eating plants, reports a new study involving UCL. Most dinosaurs were plant eaters, although they are all descended from a carnivorous ancestor. Much is already known about how different dinosaurs consumed their food, but relatively little is understood about how they evolved their preferred eating styles.
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