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Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 13.01.2021
Quantum tech to help weigh universe’s most elusive particle
Researchers are leading a £3.8 million project to develop quantum technology aimed at detecting the mass of a neutrino, the universe's most abundant but elusive particle of matter. UCL is playing a key role in three of the seven projects. Neutrinos are millions of times lighter than electrons and are poorly understood as they can pass through matter undetected.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 13.01.2021
Smacking young children has long-lasting effects
Children who have adverse experiences such as being smacked at the age of three are more likely to suffer from poor mental health and have behavioural problems through to age 14, according to a study led by UCL researchers. Children who have adverse experiences such as being smacked at the age of three are more likely to suffer from poor mental health and have behavioural problems through to age 14, according to a study led by UCL researchers.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 13.01.2021
Scientists to lead hunt for dark matter
Cardiff University scientists are to lead a consortium hoping to track down one of the most mysterious materials in the Universe - dark matter. The £5m Quantum-Enhanced Interferometry (QI) collaboration will use state-of-the-art quantum technology to shed more light on the material which makes up roughly 27 per cent of the Universe but has yet to be directly detected.

Environment - 13.01.2021
Melting icebergs key to sequence of an ice age, scientists find
Scientists claim to have found the ‘missing link' in the process that leads to an ice age on Earth. Melting icebergs in the Antarctic are the key, say the team from Cardiff University, triggering a series of chain reactions that plunges Earth into a prolonged period of cold temperatures. It has long been known that ice age cycles are paced by periodic changes to Earth's orbit of the sun, which subsequently changes the amount of solar radiation that reaches the Earth's surface.

Pedagogy - 12.01.2021
Family court decisions distorted by misuse of key research, say experts
Family court decisions distorted by misuse of key research, say experts
Family courts are misunderstanding and misusing research around how children form close relationships with their caregivers, say an international group of experts. The decisions reached by family courts can have a major impact on a child's life, but as we've seen, these decisions may be based on incorrect understanding and assumptions Robbie Duschinsky Seventy experts from across the globe argue that widespread misunderstandings around attachment research have hampered its accurate implementation, with potentially negative consequences for decisions in family courts.

History / Archeology - 12.01.2021
New insights from original Domesday survey revealed | University of Oxford
New insights from original Domesday survey revealed | University of Oxford
Prof. Stephen Baxter is a world-leading expert on Domesday Book. His research has formed the basis of radio and television documentaries, including on the Domesday survey (BBC2) . He is Clarendon Professor of Medieval History and Barron Fellow in Medieval History at St Peter's College, Oxford ( stephen.baxter@spc.ox.ac.uk ) This new interpretation of Domesday is advanced by Stephen Baxter, ‘How and Why was Domesday Made'', English Historical Review , Volume 135, Issue 576 ( published online 22 December, 2020 and freely accessible ).

Environment - Life Sciences - 12.01.2021
Climate change damage to the homes of clownfish affects their physiology
The metabolism of clownfish - or anemonefish - decreases when their sea 'homes' are damaged by climate change, according to a new study. The research - led by an international team of scientists from the University of Glasgow and CRIOBE, and published today in Functional Ecology - found that exposure to bleached coral reefs can have a negative effect on the physiology and growth of anemonefish.

Astronomy / Space Science - 11.01.2021
Galaxy mergers could limit star formation
Galaxy mergers could limit star formation
Our astronomers have looked nine billion years into the past to find evidence that galaxy mergers in the early universe could shut down star formation and affect galaxy growth. Using a powerful Earth-based telescope they saw that a huge amount of star-forming gas was ejected into the universe by the coming together of two galaxies.

Health - 11.01.2021
Light-carrying chips advance machine learning
New study shows targeting arterial stiffening earlier in a person's lifespan could provide cognitive benefits in older age and may help to delay the onset of dementia. Researchers at the University of Oxford and University College London investigated 542 older adults who received two measurements of aortic stiffness, at 64 years old and 68 years old.

Chemistry - Environment - 11.01.2021
Scientists make sustainable polymer from sugars in wood
Scientists from Bath's Centre for Sustainable and Circular Technologies have made a sustainable polymer using the second most abundant sugar in nature, xylose. Last updated on Monday 11 January 2021 Not only does the new nature-inspired material reduce reliance on crude oil products, but its properties can also be easily controlled to make the material flexible or crystalline.

Health - 11.01.2021
COVID-19: Online tool identifies patients at highest risk of deterioration
A new risk-stratification tool which can accurately predict the likelihood of deterioration in adults hospitalised with COVID-19 has been developed by UCL researchers, in collaboration with the UK Coronavirus Clinical Characterisation Consortium (known as ISARIC4C). Researchers say the online tool, made freely available to NHS doctors on Friday 8 January 2021, could support clinicians' decision making - helping to improve patient outcomes and ultimately save lives.

Health - 08.01.2021
International travel key to the introduction and early undetected community transmission of COVID-19 in Scotland
Scientists sequencing virus samples from the first confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Scotland (and through the first wave) have found evidence of community transmission, driven by multiple introductions through international travel, as early as February 2020. In new research had multiple introductions to Scotland in early 2020, mainly from European countries such as Italy and Spain.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.01.2021
Study identifies genetic changes likely to have enabled SARS-CoV-2 to jump from bats to humans
Study identifies genetic changes likely to have enabled SARS-CoV-2 to jump from bats to humans
A new study, involving the University of Cambridge and led by the Pirbright Institute, has identified key genetic changes in SARS-CoV-2 - the virus that causes COVID-19 - that may be responsible for the jump from bats to humans, and established which animals have cellular receptors that allow the virus to enter their cells most effectively.

Health - Chemistry - 08.01.2021
Branching out: DNA discovery could advance degenerative disease treatments
New research on the structure and dynamics of a branched form of DNA called a three-way junction could lead to more effectively targeted treatments for degenerative disorders like Huntington's Disease, scientists say. In a new paper published , chemists from the University of Glasgow show for the first time how three-way DNA junctions undergo unexpected rearrangements in their structure.

Paleontology - Environment - 07.01.2021
Research explains why crocodiles have changed so little since the age of the dinosaurs
Research explains why crocodiles have changed so little since the age of the dinosaurs
New research by scientists at the University of Bristol explains how a 'stop-start' pattern of evolution, governed by environmental change, could explain why crocodiles have changed so little since the age of the dinosaurs. Crocodiles today look very similar to ones from the Jurassic period some 200 million years ago.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.01.2021
Deadly parasites create unique cellular structures to survive
Scientists have solved a key parasitic puzzle, revealing the unique and complex structures toxoplasmosis and malaria parasites make in order to survive in different hosts. The new study, led by the University of Glasgow in collaboration with the University of Stockholm, and published , details how certain parasites can create unique cellular structures to control how they create energy and thus survive in different hosts.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.01.2021
'Virtual biopsies' could replace tissue biopsies in future thanks to technique developed by Cambridge scientists
’Virtual biopsies’ could replace tissue biopsies in future thanks to technique developed by Cambridge scientists
A new advanced computing technique using routine medical scans to enable doctors to take fewer, more accurate tumour biopsies, has been developed by cancer researchers at the University of Cambridge. This is an important step towards precision tissue sampling for cancer patients to help select the best treatment.

Health - 05.01.2021
Dental experts discover biological imbalance is the reason for link between gum and kidney disease
An imbalance of the body's oxygen producing free radicals and its antioxidant cells could be the reason why gum disease and chronic kidney disease affect each other, a new study led by the University of Birmingham has found. Periodontitis - or gum disease - is a common, inflammatory disease which causes bleeding gums, wobbly or drifting teeth and can eventually result in tooth loss.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 05.01.2021
Imminent sudden stratospheric warming to occur, bringing increased risk of snow over coming weeks
Imminent sudden stratospheric warming to occur, bringing increased risk of snow over coming weeks
A new study, led by researchers at the Universities of Bristol, Exeter and Bath, helps to shed light on the winter weather we may soon have in store following a dramatic meteorological event currently unfolding high above the North Pole. Weather forecasting models are predicting with increasing confidence that a sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) event will take place today, 5 January 2021.

Health - Pharmacology - 05.01.2021
Bedside EEG test can aid prognosis in unresponsive brain injury patients
Assessing the ability of unresponsive patients with severe brain injury to understand what is being said to them could yield important insights into how they might recover, according to new research. A team at the University of Birmingham has shown that responses to speech can be measured using electroencephalography, a non-invasive technique used to record electrical signals in the brain.

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