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Results 21 - 40 of 459.


Health - Psychology - 01.02.2023
Link between talking therapy and lower rates of dementia assessed
Link between talking therapy and lower rates of dementia assessed
Using talking therapies to effectively treat depression in adults over the age of 65 may be clinically linked with slightly reduced rates of future dementia diagnosis, finds a new analysis of health data led by UCL researchers. In this first-of-its-kind study, published in  Psychological Medicine  and funded by the Alzheimer's Society, researchers assessed whether psychological therapies, such as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), used to treat depression could play a role in dementia risk reduction.

Health - 01.02.2023
Ultra-processed foods may be linked to increased risk of cancer
Higher consumption of ultra-processed foods may be linked to an increased risk of developing and dying from cancer, an Imperial-led study suggests. Researchers from Imperial's School of Public Health have produced the most comprehensive assessment to date of the association between ultra-processed foods and the risk of developing cancers.

Psychology - 01.02.2023
Moderate alcohol intoxication does not impair recall of sexual assault
Women are able to recall details of sexual assault and rape with accuracy, even if they have drunk - or expected to drink - moderate amounts of alcohol. A study conducted at the University of Birmingham demonstrated that women who had drunk alcohol up to the legal limit for driving were able to recall details of an assault in a hypothetical scenario, including details of activities to which they had, and had not, consented.

Health - Veterinary - 01.02.2023
Rottweilers at greatest risk of cranial cruciate ligament rupture
A new study from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) explores the reasons for cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture in dogs in the UK, as well as the factors influencing how it is managed clinically. The research also identifies which breeds are most at risk of CCL, with this list including popular breeds such as Rottweilers, Bichon Frise and West Highland White Terriers.

Media - 01.02.2023
Why reflecting on your values before opening your mouth makes for happier relationships
A new psychology study finds if people are asked to reflect on their life values before engaging in discussions, debates are more convivial and harmonious. Ever found yourself angry at a situation and in desperate need to tell the world about it by ranting to anyone who-ll listen? Maybe it's time to pause; inhale and reflect on what values you hold dear.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.02.2023
The way genes are switched on in one-cell embryos may resemble the trigger for cancer
The way genes are switched on in one-cell embryos may resemble the trigger for cancer
Bath embryologists find that after fertilisation, mouse embryo genes are switched on in a pre-set order and that the triggers responsible are linked to cancer. When an embryo is formed, its genes - donated by a fertilising sperm and egg - are silent. Somehow, at an early stage of development, embryo genes must be switched on.

Health - 31.01.2023
Three or more concussions linked with worse brain function in later life
Experiencing three or more concussions is linked with worsened brain function in later life, according to new research. The study - the largest of its kind - also found having just one moderate-to-severe concussion, or traumatic brain injury (TBI), can have a long-term impact on brain function, including memory.

Health - Pharmacology - 30.01.2023
New study into Tuberculosis membrane molecules will aid drug delivery
A new method to aid in the development of antibiotics for tuberculosis (TB) infections has been devised. TB rivals covid-19 as the biggest infectious disease killer of humans, claiming millions of lives each year. Now, ground-breaking research from the Universities of Warwick and Toulouse has identified a new method to help tackle this global issue.

Environment - 30.01.2023
Sewage overspills result from lack of infrastructure investment
The recent uptick in sewage overspill events is due to infrastructure not keeping up with demand, according to Imperial College London research. The conclusion suggests other proposals for dealing with the problem - such as preventing blockages and separating rain and foul water - will not be enough to solve the issue of polluting sewage overspills.

Health - 30.01.2023
Living in rural England linked to better memory performance
Living in rural England linked to better memory performance
People aged 50 and over who live in rural England do better in memory tests than counterparts who live in English towns and cities, according to a new study led by UCL researchers. The study, published in the Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences, looked at the results of memory tests taken by two nationally representative population samples, whose participants were aged 50 and over, in England and China.

Health - 27.01.2023
Continued ear wax services crucial, say Manchester researchers
A new study by University of Manchester audiologists has highlighted the difficulties people face with impacted ear wax. The findings are published in the British Journal of General Practice as more and more people face the prospect of ear wax removal services being discontinued at their GP surgeries.

Pharmacology - Health - 27.01.2023
New blood test could save lives of heart attack victims
New blood test could save lives of heart attack victims
Researchers from the Herring group in Oxford's Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics have developed a blood test that measures stress hormone levels after heart attacks. The test - costing just £10 - could ensure patients receive timely life-saving treatment. Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death in the UK.

Astronomy / Space Science - 27.01.2023
Meteorites reveal likely origin of Earth's volatile chemicals
Meteorites reveal likely origin of Earth’s volatile chemicals
Meteorites have told researchers the likely far-flung origin of Earth's volatile chemicals, some of which form the building blocks of life. They found that around half the Earth's inventory of the volatile element zinc came from asteroids originating in the outer Solar System - the part beyond the asteroid belt that includes the planets Jupiter , Saturn , and Uranus.

Health - Pharmacology - 27.01.2023
Loyalty card data could help identify ovarian cancer symptoms sooner
Loyalty card data could help identify ovarian cancer symptoms sooner
Loyalty card data on over-the-counter medicine purchases could help spot ovarian cancer cases earlier, finds a new study involving UCL researchers. The first-of-its kind study, published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance , found that pain and indigestion medication purchases were higher in women who were subsequently diagnosed with ovarian cancer, compared to women who did not have ovarian cancer.

Career - Health - 27.01.2023
People with arthritis 20% less likely to be in work
The typical person living with arthritis in the UK is 20% less likely to be in work than their equivalent without the condition, new research shows. And the most striking finding was that non-university educated women aged 60-plus are at least 37% less likely to be in work if they have arthritis, compared to matched individuals without the condition.

Health - Economics / Business - 26.01.2023
Sugary drinks tax may have prevented over 5,000 cases of obesity a year in year six girls alone
Sugary drinks tax may have prevented over 5,000 cases of obesity a year in year six girls alone
The introduction of the soft drinks industry levy - the -sugary drinks tax in England was followed by a drop in the number of cases of obesity among older primary school children, according to Cambridge researchers. Taking into account current trends in obesity, their estimates suggest that around 5,000 cases of obesity per year may have been prevented in year six girls alone.

Environment - 26.01.2023
Low emission energy systems can create water conflict without smart design
A new study published today in Nature Sustainability has found that using hydropower dams to generate low emission energy can cause problems for other economic sectors such as food production unless smart designs are employed. Access to sustainable electricity is required to deliver the UN's Sustainable Development Goals, but over 700 million people around the world still lack reliable electricity access.

Health - Pharmacology - 26.01.2023
Loyalty card data could help to identify ovarian cancer symptoms sooner
Loyalty card data on over-the-counter medicine purchases could help spot ovarian cancer cases earlier, an Imperial College London-led study suggests. The study of almost 300 women found that pain and indigestion medication purchases were higher in women who were subsequently diagnosed with ovarian cancer, compared to women who did not have ovarian cancer.

Life Sciences - 26.01.2023
COVID has increased trust in genetics
A survey of over 2,000 British adults finds that trust in genetics is high and went up significantly during the pandemic. It also finds that there is a hunger for more coverage of genetics. These results really challenge us to double our efforts. We need to rise to the new opportunity and the challenge created by the outcomes of this survey.

Environment - Social Sciences - 26.01.2023
Small-scale octopus fisheries can provide sustainable source of vital nutrients for tropical coastal communities
Undernourished coastal communities in the tropics - where children's growth can be stunted by a lack of micronutrients - can get the vitamins and minerals they need from sustainable small-scale octopus fisheries, say researchers. Just a small serving of something very, very micronutrient rich, like octopus, can fill critical nutritional gaps.