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Results 21 - 40 of 465.


Health - Pharmacology - 06.12.2019
Patients at risk because NHS hospitals using different record-keeping systems
A major survey of medical record keeping in the NHS has revealed critical deficiencies that could risk patients' safety. Researchers at the Institute of Global Health Innovation (IGHI) at Imperial College London, found NHS Trusts were using at least 21 different electronic medical record systems which are unable to effectively share information.

Health - 06.12.2019
Domestic abuse survivors twice at risk of long-term illnesses
Female survivors of domestic abuse are at double the risk of developing long-term illnesses that cause widespread bodily pain and extreme tiredness, shows a study by the Universities of Birmingham and Warwick. Published today in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence , the research shows that women who have experienced domestic abuse are almost twice as likely to develop fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) than those who have not.

Environment - Life Sciences - 05.12.2019
Wildlife in tropics hardest hit by forests being broken up
Wildlife in tropics hardest hit by forests being broken up
Tropical species are six times more sensitive to forests being broken up for logging or farming than temperate species, says new research. A team led by Oregon State University and including Imperial College London scientists found that sensitivity to forest fragmentation - the breakup of forests by human activities like logging or farming - increased six-fold at low versus high latitudes, putting tropical species at greater risk of extinction.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 05.12.2019
Carbon emissions from volcanic rocks can create global warming - study
Carbon emissions from volcanic rocks can create global warming - study
Greenhouse gas emissions released directly from the movement of volcanic rocks are capable of creating massive global warming effects - a discovery which could transform the way scientists predict climate change, a new study reveals. Scientists' calculations based on how carbon-based greenhouse gas levels link to movements of magma just below earth's surface suggest that such geological change has caused the largest temporary global warming of the past 65 million years.

Pharmacology - Health - 05.12.2019
Reveals dramatic rise in patients ’cured’ of heart condition following GP performance pay scheme
The introduction of a performance-related financial incentive scheme for GPs led to a dramatic almost five-fold rise in the number of patients whose heart rhythm condition was said to have been ‘cured', say University of Birmingham researchers. Academics at the University of Birmingham's Institute of Applied Health Research, supported by NIHR ARC West Midlands, conducted a study into patients with the most common heart rhythm condition, called atrial fibrillation.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 05.12.2019
Social influencers: what can we learn from animals?
Research from Oxford University calls us to reconsider how behaviours may spread through societies of wild animals, and how this might provide new insights into human social networks. Our social connections to one another, whether it be online or in real life, give rise to our 'social networks'. Previously, it has often been assumed that the individuals with the most social connections are the primary 'social influencers' and most likely to acquire, and spread, new behaviours.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.12.2019
Protein antibiotics offer new hope for fighting common crop diseases
Scientists have tested a new way to protect crops from a widespread and devastating bacterial disease, without using environmentally damaging chemical sprays. An interdisciplinary team at the University of Glasgow have revealed a new method that could protect many important crop species against the common crop bacteria Pseudomonas syringae ( Ps ).

Pedagogy - 05.12.2019
Reveals what factors influence young people’s gambling habits
GambleAware is today [5 December] holding its annual conference , with the theme of 'Keeping children and young people safe from gambling harms'. The event, which will be attended by gambling industry experts, policymakers and treatment providers will also be a forum of discussion for the gambling specific findings of the Children of the 90s study.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.12.2019
Being active reduces risk of prostate cancer
This new study, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology today [5 December], was led by the University of Bristol and co-funded by World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and Cancer Research UK (CRUK). It found that people with the variation in their DNA sequence that makes them more likely to be active, had a 51 per cent reduced risk of prostate cancer than people who did not have this particular variation.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 04.12.2019
Closest-ever approach to the Sun gives new insights into the solar wind
Closest-ever approach to the Sun gives new insights into the solar wind
The Parker Solar Probe spacecraft, which has flown closer to the Sun than any mission before, has found new evidence of the origins of the solar wind. NASA's Parker Solar Probe was launched in August 2018. Its first results are published today in a series of four papers in Nature , with Imperial College London scientists among those interpreting some of the key data to reveal how the solar wind is accelerated away from the surface of the Sun.

Pharmacology - Health - 04.12.2019
Typhoid vaccine over 81% effective in tackling disease in Nepal
Typhoid vaccine over 81% effective in tackling disease in Nepal
A large field study of typhoid conjugate vaccine (TCV) in Nepal has shown a single dose to be safe and effective in reducing typhoid in children aged 9 months to <16 years in an endemic setting. Caused by the bacterium Salmonella Typhi, typhoid is a major cause of fever in children in lowand middle-income countries and is responsible for nearly 11 million cases and more than 116,000 deaths a year worldwide.

Health - Social Sciences - 04.12.2019
Young women face unnecessary surgery for suspected appendicitis - study
Thousands of young women are unnecessarily admitted to UK hospitals and undergo surgery they do not need each year in the NHS, according to a new study. Surgery for appendicitis is one of the world's most common emergency operations. UK hospitals exhibit the world's highest rate of ‘normal appendicectomy,' where patients undergo surgery for suspected appendicitis but laboratory examination of the removed appendix finds it to be normal.

Social Sciences - 04.12.2019
Sleep helps memory, right? Not for eyewitnesses
New research investigating the effect of sleep on eyewitness memory has found that having a period of sleep, compared to a period of wake, does not improve eyewitness identification accuracy. The research team, led by PhD student, David Morgan at Royal Holloway, University of London, Professor Laura Mickes, senior author at the University of Bristol and including researchers from Royal Holloway, the Universities of California, USA and Birmingham, and funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) is published today [4 December] in Royal Society Open Science .

Pharmacology - Health - 03.12.2019
One dose of radiotherapy as effective as five doses for cancer in the spine
A single dose of radiotherapy is as "effective" as five doses for end-of-life cancer patients suffering with painful spinal canal compression, finds a large study conducted by UCL. Spinal canal compression is a common complication in cancer patients when the cancer has spread to their spine. Radiotherapy is used to control pain and alleviate symptoms.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.12.2019
World first as artificial neurons developed to cure chronic diseases
Artificial neurons on silicon chips that behave just like the real thing have been invented by scientists - a first-of-its-kind achievement with enormous scope for medical devices to cure chronic diseases, such as heart failure, Alzheimer's, and other diseases of neuronal degeneration. Critically the artificial neurons not only behave just like biological neurons but only need one billionth the power of a microprocessor, making them ideally suited for use in medical implants and other bio-electronic devices.

Administration - 03.12.2019
Opinion poll lessons reveal deficit in Government safety spending
Opinion poll lessons reveal deficit in Government safety spending
The government currently uses a measure known as the value of a prevented fatality or VPF to determine spending on safety across several major departments, including the Department for Transport. In contrast with political opinion polls, which generally survey a minimum of 1,000 people to achieve the standard three per cent margin of error, the VPF is based on a survey of only 167 people, carried out 20 years ago.

Administration - 03.12.2019
Cultural differences account for global gap in online regulation - study
Differences in cultural values have led some countries to tackle the spectre of cyber-attacks with increased internet regulation, whilst others have taken a ‘hands-off' approach to online security - a new study shows. Internet users gravitate towards one of two ‘poles' of social values. Risk-taking users are found in ‘competitive' national cultures prompting heavy regulation, whilst web users in ‘co-operative' nations exhibit less risky behaviour requiring lighter regulation.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 03.12.2019
Analysis: We may have solved the mystery of how landslides form on Mars
Mars's huge landslides can move at speeds of up to 360 kilometres an hour for up to tens of kilometres. PhD candidate Giulia Magnarini and Dr Tom Mitchell (UCL Earth Sciences) write about how these landslides may have formed. Some landslides on Mars seem to defy an important law of physics. "Long, runout landslides" are formed by huge volumes of rock and soil moving downslope, largely due to the force of gravity.

Pharmacology - Health - 02.12.2019
Face mask can help combat mild cases of sleep condition
Face mask can help combat mild cases of sleep condition
A night time face mask can improve energy levels and vitality in people who suffer from the condition sleep apnoea. This is the finding from a new study of over 200 patients, published in the journal The Lancet Respiratory Medicine , led by Imperial College London. We are seeing increasing cases of sleep apnoea, and in a wide range of patients.

Environment - Life Sciences - 02.12.2019
Reveals climate change impact on Antarctic penguins | University of Oxford
Reveals climate change impact on Antarctic penguins | University of Oxford
Antarctic penguins have been on the forefront of climate change, experiencing massive changes to their natural habitat as the world's temperatures and human activity in the region have increased. Now, new research has revealed how penguins have dealt with more than a century of human impacts in Antarctica and why some species are winners or losers in this rapidly changing ecosystem.

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