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Results 21 - 40 of 525.


Health - Pharmacology - 20.01.2020
Blood test for eight gene signatures could predict onset of tuberculosis
Scientists at UCL have shown a blood test could predict the onset of tuberculosis three to six months before people become unwell, a finding which could help better target antibiotics and save countless lives. In the study, published iná The Lancet Respiratory Medicine , researchers sought to identify which, if any, gene expression signatures in blood could be used to predict the disease at a very early stage and before symptoms arise.

Pharmacology - Health - 20.01.2020
Prolonged breath-holding could help radiotherapy treatment of cardiac arrhythmias
A technique that enables patients suffering from heart conditions to hold their breath safely for over 5 minutes could have potential as part of a new treatment for cardiac arrhythmias, say researchers at the University of Birmingham. In a new study, published in Frontiers in Physiology, researchers initially proposed the technique as a new means for earlier diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease.

Pharmacology - Social Sciences - 20.01.2020
Racial disparities in drug prescriptions for dementia
Disparities in drug prescribing suggest that black and Asian people with dementia are not receiving the same quality of care as their white peers, according to a new UCL-led study in the UK. Asian people with dementia are less likely to receive anti-dementia drugs, and take them for shorter periods, according to the findings published in Clinical Epidemiology .

Environment - Earth Sciences - 20.01.2020
Local water availability is permanently reduced after planting forests
Local water availability is permanently reduced after planting forests
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Pedagogy - 20.01.2020
Becoming less active and gaining weight: downsides of becoming an adult
Becoming less active and gaining weight: downsides of becoming an adult
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Social Sciences - 17.01.2020
Older ethnic minority adults have fewer close friends
Older adults from ethnic minority groups report having fewer close friends and fewer friends who live locally than older white people, according a new UCL study. The research, published iná Ageing & Society , found that Black and Asian adults over the age of 65 years are almost twice as likely to report having no close friends (9% and 7% respectively) compared to White and mixed or 'other' ethnicity adults of the same age (both 4%).

Life Sciences - Environment - 16.01.2020
Scientists uncover how an explosion of new genes explain the origin of land plants
Scientists have made a significant discovery about the genetic origins of how plants evolved from living in water to land 470 million years ago. The new study, led by scientists from the universities of Bristol and Essex and published today [16 January] in Current Biology , challenge the established view of the origin of plants on land, and reveal that compared to the origin of animals, plants are better at inventing new genes during periods of evolution.

Pharmacology - Health - 16.01.2020
Cheap roundworm drug found to enhance the effects of chemotherapy in prostate cancer
Scientists at the University of Glasgow and Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute have tested close to 1000 existing medicines and discovered that a cheap drug commonly used to treat parasitic worm infection could be a game-changing treatment for prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer affecting men and the second most common cause of cancer death for men in the UK.

Environment - Social Sciences - 16.01.2020
Small change for climate change: Why research funding to save the world needs to be drastically stepped up
Small change for climate change: Why research funding to save the world needs to be drastically stepped up
Researchers from the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs and the University of Sussex analysed USD 1.3 trillion of research funding around the world. Between 1990 and 2018, less than 4.59% of the funding was spent on climate-related research. Only 0.12% of the research funding was spent on a critical issue: how to change societies to mitigate climate change.

Social Sciences - 16.01.2020
Far-right violence in Portugal draws strength from skinhead roots - study
Far-right agitators in Portugal now have different reasons to their 1970s predecessors for becoming radicalised and committing acts of political violence - a new study shows. Influenced by the international ‘skinhead' movement from the mid-1980s, current extremists drawn largely from the working classes have turned to violence to ‘protect' white Portugal and Europe against the ‘threat' posed by multi-racial and multicultural society.

Social Sciences - Health - 16.01.2020
Lifetime suicide risk factors identified
A new review of previous studies into suicide worldwide has highlighted the effects of individual and environmental risk factors over a lifetime.

Life Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 16.01.2020
Artificial intelligence used to predict 3D structure of proteins
A deep learning system can predict the structure of a protein using its genetic sequence more accurately than any previous modelling system, according to a study by researchers at DeepMind and UCL. Nearly every function our body performs relies on proteins. Predicting the intricate 3D structure of a protein is important because its structure largely determines its function and, once the structure is known, scientists can develop drugs that target this unique shape.

Pharmacology - Health - 16.01.2020
Patients needed for irritable bowel syndrome trial
Patients needed for irritable bowel syndrome trial
Patients in GP surgeries in Bristol are being invited to take part in a large trial of low-dose amitriptyline for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) lead by researchers from the universities of Bristol, Leeds and Southampton. IBS is a common gut disorder affecting one in ten people. Abdominal pain, bloating, and altered bowel habit affect patients' quality of life substantially and can force them to take days off work.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 16.01.2020
Probiotic drink could offer new way to combat antibiotic resistance
A probiotic drink could become a promising new weapon in the battle against antibiotic resistant bacteria, after a team of scientists at the University of Birmingham engineered and patented a key genetic element that can tackle the genetic basis of resistance. The team is now seeking funding for a clinical trial for the drink which has potential to work against many resistant bacteria commonly found in the human gut including E. coli, Salmonella and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 16.01.2020
Asteroid impact, not volcanic eruptions, killed the dinosaurs
Volcanic activity did not play a direct role in the mass extinction event that killed the dinosaurs and about 75 per cent of Earth's species 66 million years ago, according to a team involving UCL and University of Southampton researchers.

Health - 15.01.2020
Obesity crisis blamed for a rise in fatty liver disease amongst young adults
Obesity crisis blamed for a rise in fatty liver disease amongst young adults
One in five young people have fatty liver disease (steatosis), with one in 40 having already developed liver scarring (fibrosis), research published today [15 January] has found. The study, published in The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology, is the first to attempt to determine the prevalence of fatty liver disease and fibrosis in young healthy adults in the UK.

Life Sciences - 15.01.2020
Analysis: Women who have more sex may enter the menopause later
Megan Arnot (UCL Anthropology) discusses a new study conducted with Professor Ruth Mace (UCL Anthropology) which found that women's sexual behaviour is connected with menopause timing. Globally, on average, women experience the menopause at around the age of 50. But there's a great deal of variation in this age both within and between countries.

Life Sciences - 15.01.2020
Women who have less sex enter the menopause earlier
Megan Arnot (UCL Anthropology) discusses a new study conducted with Professor Ruth Mace (UCL Anthropology) which found that women's sexual behaviour is connected with menopause timing. Globally, on average, women experience the menopause at around the age of 50. But there's a great deal of variation in this age both within and between countries.

Life Sciences - 15.01.2020
Animals reduce the symmetry of their markings to improve camouflage
Animals reduce the symmetry of their markings to improve camouflage
Some forms of camouflage have evolved in animals to exploit a loophole in the way predators perceive their symmetrical markings. The University of Bristol findings, published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B today [15 Jan], describe how animals have evolved to mitigate this defensive disadvantage in their colouration.

Life Sciences - 15.01.2020
Animals should use short, fast movements to avoid being located
Most animals need to move, whether this is to seek out food, shelter or a mate. New research has shown that movement doesn't always break camouflage and if an animal needs to move, animals that are unpatterned and use short, fast movements are less likely to be located by predators. In most cases, most of the visual field of a predator does not fall within a high-resolution area and so, when an undetected prey moves, that motion will often be in peripheral vision.

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