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Life Sciences - Criminology / Forensics - 26.02.2024
Biocompatible fluorescent spray that detects fingerprints in ten seconds
Biocompatible fluorescent spray that detects fingerprints in ten seconds
Bath researchers have helped produce a safer, more sustainable fingerprint detection spray that could be used on multiple types of surface. Published on Monday 26 February 2024 Last updated on Monday 26 February 2024 Scientists have developed a water soluble, non-toxic fluorescent spray that makes fingerprints visible in just a few seconds, making forensic investigations safer, easier and quicker.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 23.02.2024
Compound vital for all life likely played a role in life's origin
Compound vital for all life likely played a role in life’s origin
A chemical compound essential to all living things has been synthesised in a lab in conditions that could have occurred on early Earth, suggesting it played a role at the outset of life, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The compound, pantetheine, is the active fragment of Coenzyme A. It is important for metabolism - the chemical processes that maintain life.

Health - Pharmacology - 23.02.2024
Diet intervention links longer remissions of type 2 diabetes and improved health over 5 years
New findings from a three-year observational extension of the landmark Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial DiRECT reveal that, for those in remission from type 2 diabetes at the end of year two of the original study, 26% still remained in remission at year five. The overall remission rate was 13% of those with data at 5 years New findings from a three-year observational extension of the landmark Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial DiRECT reveal that, for those in remission from type 2 diabetes at the end of year two of the original study, 26% still remained in remission at year five.

Health - 23.02.2024
Having a ’regular doctor’ can significantly reduce GP workload
If all GP practices moved to a model where patients saw the same doctor at each visit, it could significantly reduce doctor workload while improving patient health, a study suggests. In one of the largest studies of its kind, researchers from the University of Cambridge and INSEAD analysed data from more than 10 million consultations in 381 English primary care practices over a period of 11 years.

Health - Pedagogy - 22.02.2024
Decreasing sedentary time in class reduces obesity in children
Introducing more movement into lessons led to an 8% reduction in children's waist-to-height ratio, according to new research from UCL and the Institute of Sport, Exercise and Health (ISEH). The study, published in Obesity Facts , is the first scientific assessment of the impact that reducing sedentary behaviour in the classroom has on obesity in primary school children.

Health - Pharmacology - 22.02.2024
ITalkBetter app significantly improves speech in stroke patients
A UCL-developed app that provides speech therapy for people with the language disorder aphasia has been found to significantly improve their ability to talk. iTalkBetter, developed by the Neurotherapeutics Group at the UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, provides users the digital platform to practice over 200 commonly used words, in their own time and without any limits on the amount of therapy they receive.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.02.2024
'Virtual biopsy' uses AI to help doctors assess lung cancer
’Virtual biopsy’ uses AI to help doctors assess lung cancer
Researchers have used artificial intelligence (AI) to extract information about the chemical makeup of lung tumours from medical scans. For the first time, they have demonstrated how combining medical imaging with AI can be used to provide a 'virtual biopsy' for cancer patients. Their non-invasive method can classify the type of lung cancer a patient has - which is crucial in selecting the right treatment - and can predict if the cancer is likely to progress.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.02.2024
'Dynamic duo' defences in bacteria ward off viral threats
’Dynamic duo’ defences in bacteria ward off viral threats
Scientists at the University of Southampton have discovered that bacteria can pair up their defence systems to create a formidable force, greater than the sum of its parts, to fight off attack from phage viruses. Understanding how bacteria react to this type of virus is a big step in combatting antimicrobial resistance.

Health - 22.02.2024
Fewer nurses linked to delayed care and serious outcomes in emergency departments
Having fewer nurses on shift in emergency departments is linked to worse outcomes for patients, including heart attacks in the department, according to a new research paper. The paper found that lower staffing levels in emergency departments were associated with longer waits, patients leaving without being seen, and longer overall stays in in the department.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.02.2024
Long COVID linked to persistently high levels of inflammatory protein: a potential biomarker and target for treatments
Long COVID linked to persistently high levels of inflammatory protein: a potential biomarker and target for treatments
SARS-CoV-2 triggers the production of the antiviral protein IFN- ? , which is associated with fatigue, muscle ache and depression. New research shows that in Long COVID patients, IFN- y production persists until symptoms improve, highlighting a potential biomarker and a target for therapies. We hope that this could help to pave the way to develop therapies and give some patients a firm diagnosis Benjamin Krishna A University of Cambridge-led study identifies the protein interferon gamma (IFN- ?

Astronomy / Space - 21.02.2024
Black hole fashions stellar beads on a string
Black hole fashions stellar beads on a string
One of the most powerful eruptions from a black hole ever recorded has been discovered by an international team of astronomers. The mega-explosion, which took place billions of years ago, may help explain the formation of a pattern of star clusters resembling beads on a string, according to the study.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.02.2024
Research progress reveals faster, more accurate blood flow simulation to revolutionise treatment of vascular diseases
A review has shed light on the groundbreaking advancements in the simulation of blood flow within the intricate vascular system that could transform medical treatment and device innovation for vascular diseases. Modelling vascular flow is crucial for understanding and treating vascular diseases, but traditional methods are labour and computationally intensive.

Health - Computer Science - 21.02.2024
Removing bias from healthcare AI tools
Rapid advances in Artificial Intelligence (AI) have opened the way for the creation of a huge range of new healthcare tools, but to ensure that these tools do not exacerbate pre-existing health inequities, researchers urge the use of more representative data in their development. Researchers from Oxford University's Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences (NDORMS) , University College London and the Centre for Ethnic Health Research , supported by Health Data Research UK , have for the first time studied the full detail of ethnicity data in the NHS.

Health - Psychology - 21.02.2024
Avid appetite in childhood linked to later eating disorder symptoms
An enthusiastic response to food in early childhood may be linked to a higher likelihood of experiencing eating disorder symptoms in adolescence, according to a new study led by researchers at UCL and Erasmus University Rotterdam. The study, published iná The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health , looked at survey data from 3,670 young people in the UK and the Netherlands to investigate how appetite traits in early childhood might relate to the likelihood of developing eating disorder symptoms up to 10 years later.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.02.2024
Red light can reduce blood glucose levels
Shining a specific frequency of red light on a person's back for 15 minutes can reduce blood sugar levels, according to a new study from City, University of London and UCL. The researchers found that 670 nm red light stimulated energy production within mitochondria, the tiny powerhouses within cells, leading to increased consumption of glucose.

Agronomy / Food Science - 21.02.2024
Breastfed babies less likely to be given treats and sweetened drinks before 12 months
Babies who are breastfed, or partially breastfed, for more than six months are less likely to be given sugar-sweetened drinks and sweet or salty snacks before they are 12 months-old, according to new research Babies who are breastfed, or partially breastfed, for more than six months are less likely to be given sugar-sweetened drinks and sweet or salty snacks before they are 12 months-old, according to new research.

Health - Physics - 20.02.2024
Terahertz biosensor detects skin cancer with remarkable accuracy
Researchers have developed a revolutionary biosensor using terahertz (THz) waves that can detect skin cancer with exceptional sensitivity, potentially paving the way for earlier and easier diagnoses. Researchers have developed a revolutionary biosensor using terahertz (THz) waves that can detect skin cancer with exceptional sensitivity, potentially paving the way for earlier and easier diagnoses.

Psychology - Health - 20.02.2024
Understanding the relationship between our sleep, body clock and mental health
Problems with our sleep and internal body clock can trigger or worsen a range of psychiatric disorders, according to a new review of recent research evidence. The review, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) , suggests gaining a better understanding of the relationship between sleep, circadian rhythms and mental health could unlock new holistic treatments to alleviate mental health problems.

Environment - 19.02.2024
UK offshores emissions through used vehicle exports
UK offshores emissions through used vehicle exports
A new study by researchers at the Leverhulme Centre for Demographic Science reveals that used vehicles sent from Great Britain to lower-income countries fail British roadworthiness standards, are more polluting and less fuel efficient than those sent to be scrapped. Published in Nature Climate Change , the study found that exported used vehicles generate at least 13-53% more emissions per mile than those that are scrapped or on the road in Great Britain.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.02.2024
Largest study on genetic risk for type 2 diabetes published
An international study of more than 2.5 million people has identified parts of the genome associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in diverse population groups from across the globe. The study potentially paves the way for genetically determined predictors of disease complications to allow earlier interventions.