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Results 81 - 100 of 455.


Environment - 10.01.2023
Hundreds of mammal species are being pushed toward extinction
A new study led by The University of Manchester has identified that mammal species are being pushed to their ecological limits in areas where they are unlikely to thrive. The researchers examined whether habitat loss caused by human activity leads to species being pushed into poor-quality environments.

Health - 10.01.2023
Urban/rural living have opposite effects on memory performance in England and China
People aged 50 and over who live in rural England tend to do better in memory tests than their counterparts who live in English towns and cities, a new study has found. However, this pattern was reversed in China, where those living in rural areas performed much worse compared to their counterparts in urban settings.

Economics / Business - 10.01.2023
Poetry and meditation power new research understanding - study
Poetry and meditation power new research understanding - study
Combining poetry and meditation may help researchers to discover new angles on the world through an unorthodox approach to data collection and analysis. ' Poetic meditation ' can enhance qualitative data analysis by offering researchers improved sensory experience and an ability to approach data analysis from unexpected directions, a new study reveals.

Physics - 10.01.2023
The optical fibre that keeps data safe even after being twisted or bent
The optical fibre that keeps data safe even after being twisted or bent
Physicists have created an optical fibre that uses the maths concept of topology to remain robust, thereby guaranteeing the high-speed transfer of information. Optical fibres are the backbone of our modern information networks. From long-range communication over the internet to high-speed information transfer within data centres and stock exchanges, optical fibre remains critical in our globalised world.

Health - Veterinary - 10.01.2023
New research from the RVC identifies insights into the cause of the 2021 outbreak of a serious feline condition
Two new studies from the RVC have examined the 2021 outbreak of feline pancytopenia - a rare condition that causes serious illness, and in some cases fatalities, in cats. Due to the rapid increase of cases at the time, the outbreak caused concern amongst cat owners and garnered significant media coverage.

Environment - 09.01.2023
Forests recovering from logging act as a source of carbon
Forests recovering from logging act as a source of carbon
Tropical forests recovering from logging are sources of carbon for years afterwards, contrary to previous assumptions, finds a new study. Tropical forests that are recovering from having trees removed were thought to be carbon absorbers, as the new trees grow quickly. A new study, led by Imperial College London researchers, turns this on its head, showing that the carbon released by soil and rotting wood outpaces the carbon absorbed by new growth.

Environment - 09.01.2023
Groundbreaking new analytical framework can provide economic benefits for Nile countries
New research led by The University of Manchester has developed unique river basin modelling software which, for the first time, combines reservoir management, economy-wide performance, and artificial intelligence techniques to design adaptive plans for various climate change situations. Published in Nature Climate Change , it reveals solutions that can provide greater economic benefits for the nations affected by the construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) - Ethiopia, Sudan and Egypt - when compared with a negotiated proposal.

Environment - 09.01.2023
Solar-powered system converts plastic and greenhouse gases into sustainable fuels
Solar-powered system converts plastic and greenhouse gases into sustainable fuels
Researchers have developed a system that can transform plastic waste and greenhouse gases into sustainable fuels and other valuable products - using just the energy from the Sun. A solar-driven technology that could help to address plastic pollution and greenhouse gases at the same time could be a game-changer in the development of a circular economy Subhajit Bhattacharjee The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, developed the system, which can convert two waste streams into two chemical products at the same time - the first time this has been achieved in a solar-powered reactor.

Health - Social Sciences - 09.01.2023
Call to address women's reproductive needs holistically
Call to address women’s reproductive needs holistically
Women's reproductive needs should be considered holistically by considering pregnancy prevention and pregnancy preparation at the same time, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The research, published in The Lancet Public Health , brought together a variety of different types of evidence - including previous studies, new data on women's preferences, and case studies of existing practice across the globe - to develop a model, which could be used to help design services in a way that better meets the needs of women and their partners.

Health - 09.01.2023
Less than four in 100 men accepted to be sperm donors
An international team of researchers, led by the University of Sheffield, mapped the outcome of over 11,700 men who applied to be sperm donors in Denmark and the US Less than four in 100 men end of the process and have samples frozen and released for treatments Over half of the men who applied to be donors withdrew from the programme before having samples released and nearly a fifth of applicants were rejected because of a health issue or becaus

Social Sciences - 09.01.2023
Opinion: Women work harder than men - our anthropological study reveals why
Professor Ruth Mace and PhD candidate Yuan Chen (both UCL Anthropology) share their anthropological study in The Conversation examining the gender division of work and how workloads are changing across different societies. For most people around the world, physical work takes up a great amount of time and energy every day.

Life Sciences - 09.01.2023
Early dinosaur skulls show how meat-eaters became vegetarian
Early dinosaur skulls show how meat-eaters became vegetarian
The skulls of early dinosaurs are helping scientists understand how some of the earliest herbivores may have evolved different ways of eating plants, reports a new study involving UCL. Most dinosaurs were plant eaters, although they are all descended from a carnivorous ancestor. Much is already known about how different dinosaurs consumed their food, but relatively little is understood about how they evolved their preferred eating styles.

Environment - Computer Science - 09.01.2023
AI to monitor changes to globally important glacier
AI to monitor changes to globally important glacier
Scientists have developed AI to track the development of crevasses - or fractures - on the Thwaites Glacier ice tongue in west Antarctica. Crevasses are indicators of stress building-up in the glacier. A team of researchers from the University of Leeds and University of Bristol have adapted an AI algorithm originally developed to identify cells in microscope images to spot crevasses forming in the ice from satellite images.

Social Sciences - 06.01.2023
Carers of people living with dementia experience discrimination
Carers of people living with dementia are treated negatively by others and face discrimination, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The research, published in BJPsych Open found that on top of known challenges experienced by carers, those who look after someone living with dementia also become stigmatised.

Mathematics - 06.01.2023
Researchers derive an equation to describe how stones skim across water
Researchers derive an equation to describe how stones skim across water
A new mathematical model that predicts how a tossed stone will skim across the surface of water has potential applications in aircraft design, finds a study involving UCL researchers. The mathematical model, published in Proceedings of the Royal Society A , factors together the possible shapes and weights of a stone, the different speeds and directions of a throw and the momentum and pressure of the water as the stone impacts.

Astronomy / Space Science - 06.01.2023
'little hurricanes' to weigh and date planets around young stars
’little hurricanes’ to weigh and date planets around young stars
Little -hurricanes- that form in the discs of gas and dust around young stars can be used to study certain aspects of planet formation, even for smaller planets which orbit their star at large distances and are out of reach for most telescopes. It's extremely difficult to study smaller planets that are far away from their star by directly imaging them: it would be like trying to spot a firefly in front of a lighthouse.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 05.01.2023
Antarctic glaciers formed 30 million years earlier than previously thought
A new study has revealed that glaciers formed in the highest mountains of Antarctica at least 60 million years ago, which is 30 million years earlier than previously thought, and almost as long ago as the geological era of the dinosaurs. The continent of Antarctica is the coldest on Earth. Its extensive ice sheets, which today occupy approximately 98% of the land surface, have shrouded the continent for the last 34 million years, when they expanded as global climate cooled dramatically at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary.

Social Sciences - 05.01.2023
Travelling farther away from home linked to better health
People who travel more outside of their local area feel that they are healthier than those who stay closer to home, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. How often people travel and the range of places visited are important, with those who regularly travel more than 15 miles away from home more likely to report being in general good health.

History / Archeology - 05.01.2023
Ice Age markings show evidence of early writing dating back 20,000 years
Ice Age markings show evidence of early writing dating back 20,000 years
Ice Age drawings and markings found in caves show that prehistoric hunter-gathers used a form of early writing to communicate essential survival information at least 14,000 years earlier than previously thought, finds a study involving a UCL researcher. Archaeologists already knew that the markings - sequences of lines, dots and other shapes - conveyed information but did not know their meaning.

Health - Pharmacology - 05.01.2023
Targeting variant of common protein may dramatically boost effectiveness of breast cancer treatment
A rare variant of a protein present in nearly all human cells may hold the key to improving the effectiveness of breast cancer treatment, according to University of Manchester research funded by Breast Cancer Now. This discovery, published today (5 January 2023) in Oncogene, is the first time scientists have identified that targeting RAC1B, a variant of the RAC1 protein, could be a potential way of improving treatment for breast cancer.