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Results 81 - 100 of 456.


Health - 25.01.2024
New report reveals impact of social sciences and humanities research
How do you assess the real-world impact of the social sciences and humanities? A team of researchers at the Leverhulme Centre for Demographic Science (LCDS) delved into around 4,000 Research Excellence Framework 2021 (REF) Impact Case Studies to reveal the impact of social sciences and humanities research.

Health - Pharmacology - 25.01.2024
Digital pathology cleared for use in cancer screening programmes
New research funded by the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) has led to the UK government approving the use of digital pathology to help speed up analysis of cancer screening samples. This allows the benefits offered by digital pathology to be used to improve cancer screening particularly in bowel, breast, lung and cervical cancers.

Environment - Physics - 25.01.2024
New tech could help reduce ecological impact of underwater noise pollution
A new system that harnesses the power of AI to accurately model how sound waves travel underwater could help reduce the impact of noise pollution on marine life. A new system that harnesses the power of AI to accurately model how sound waves travel underwater could help reduce the impact of noise pollution on marine life.

Social Sciences - 25.01.2024
Facial features linked to stereotypes and social class perception
Research shows that people are quick to form impressions of other people's social class standing, which can have important consequences - but what specifically drives these impressions, and their relationship to judgements of harmful or advantageous stereotypes, has remained unknown. Social class is a powerful hierarchy that determines many privileges and disadvantages in society.

Health - 25.01.2024
Bystander support is crucial for tackling anti-social behaviour
Bystander support is crucial for tackling anti-social behaviour
Confronting poor behaviour cannot be left to a single voice to be effective, shows new research highlighting the importance of bystander intervention. Published on Thursday 25 January 2024 Last updated on Thursday 25 January 2024 Witnesses to anti-social behaviour must speak up to support the lone voices of people who confront it to reduce the risk of such behaviour becoming tolerated in society, according to research from the Universities of Bath, Groningen and Western Australia.

Environment - 24.01.2024
Global groundwater levels declining rapidly, but they can recover
Global groundwater levels declining rapidly, but they can recover
Groundwater levels are declining at rapid and accelerating rates in numerous aquifers around the world, but the decline can be reversed in some cases, finds a new study involving researchers from University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB), UCL and ETH Zürich. The research, published in Nature , analysed measurements taken over the last two decades from 170,000 wells in 1,693 aquifer systems across more than 40 countries.

Astronomy / Space - 24.01.2024
New search finds 85 exoplanet candidates – as cool as planets in our own Solar System
New search finds 85 exoplanet candidates - as cool as planets in our own Solar System Astronomers have discovered 85 possible planets outside of our solar system, with temperatures closer to those of our own Solar System planets, potentially cool enough to sustain life. These exoplanet candidates, discovered using data from data from NASA's Transitioning Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), are similar in size to Jupiter, Saturn and Neptune in our Solar System.

Health - Materials Science - 24.01.2024
New Wearable Sensor Accurately Tracks Tiny Changes in the Breath Process
"Our sensor is like a highly accurate microphone for your breath. It can pick up on the tiniest changes in airflow, providing valuable physiological information on an individual, for example related to their cardiac, neurological and pulmonary conditions as well as certain types of illness. " Manchester scientists have developed a new type of wearable sensor that can precisely track your breath, even the slightest changes in the exhaling and inhaling processes.

Agronomy / Food Science - 24.01.2024
Mechanics behind root vegetable ageing
Mechanics behind root vegetable ageing
Undergraduate research conducted in a kitchen during lockdown could reduce food waste and help keep veg in prime condition for longer Published on Wednesday 24 January 2024 Last updated on Wednesday 24 January 2024 Chopped carrot pieces are among the most universally enjoyed foods and a snacking staple - a mainstay of school lunchboxes, picnics and party platters year-round.

Health - Veterinary - 24.01.2024
New research highlights surprisingly good health characteristics in Shih Tzu dogs in the UK
New research from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) has found the most common conditions diagnosed in Shih Tzu dogs in the UK are periodontal disease (inflammation of the gums and tissue around the teeth), anal sac impaction and ear disorders. While the findings suggest that the breed is predisposed to a number of conditions, the overall disorder profile of the Shih Tzu is surprisingly different and better than many other common flat-faced breeds.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.01.2024
Financial stress linked to worse biological health
Financial stress linked to worse biological health
People who experience stressful life events or circumstances are more likely to have worse biological health, as indicated by biomarkers involved in the interaction between our immune, nervous and endocrine systems, according to a new study by UCL researchers. The study, published in the journal Brain, Behavior and Immunity , found that not only major stressful experiences such as bereavement but chronic challenges such as financial strain were detrimental to the healthy interaction of these systems.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.01.2024
Colours fade as people age
Colours fade as people age
There is a difference between how the brains of healthy older adults perceive colour compared to younger adults, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The research, published in Scientific Reports , compared how the pupils of younger and older people reacted to different aspects of colour in the environment.

Computer Science - 22.01.2024
New way to counter mobile phone 'account takeover' attacks
New way to counter mobile phone ’account takeover’ attacks
To understand and prevent these attacks, researchers had to get into the mind of the hacker, who builds a complex attack by combining smaller tactical steps. Computer science researchers have developed a new way to identify security weaknesses that leave people vulnerable to account takeover attacks, where a hacker gains unauthorized access to online accounts.

Health - Social Sciences - 22.01.2024
Widening inequalities are fuelling childhood obesity
New research shows how widening inequalities are fuelling childhood obesity Childhood obesity has increased the most in less advantaged groups, according to a new study Childhood obesity has increased the most in less advantaged groups, according to a new study. The research - led by the University of Glasgow and published in Archives of Disease in Childhood - found that despite a plateau in overall childhood obesity since 2004, widening societal inequalities meant the increased prevalence of overweight and obesity was seen primarily in socioeconomically disadvantaged children.

Veterinary - Health - 22.01.2024
High levels of problem behaviours and use of aversive training methods in pandemic puppies
The pawfect storm: study finds high levels of problem behaviours and use of aversive training methods in pandemic puppies The average number of owner-reported problem behaviours among 'pandemic puppies' was five, with problem behaviours more likely in owners using aversive training techniques, says the Royal Veterinary College Four in five (82%) 'pandemic puppy' owners have reported using aversive training methods in attempts to address their dog's problem behaviours, according to a new study by the Royal Veterinary College (RVC).

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 18.01.2024
Lightest black hole or heaviest neutron star? Manchester astronomers uncover a mysterious object in Milky Way
An artist's impression of the system assuming that the massive companion star is a black hole. The brightest background star is its orbital companion, the radio pulsar PSR J0514-4002E. The two stars are separated by 8 million km and circle each other every 7 days. An international team of astronomers have found a new and unknown object in the Milky Way that is heavier than the heaviest neutron stars known and yet simultaneously lighter than the lightest black holes known.

Health - Economics - 18.01.2024
Removing largest wine glass serving reduces amount of wine sold in bars and pubs
Removing largest wine glass serving reduces amount of wine sold in bars and pubs
Taking away the largest serving of wine by the glass - in most cases the 250ml option - led to an average reduction in the amount of wine sold at pubs and bars of just under 8%, new research led by a team at the University of Cambridge has discovered. When the largest serving size of wine by the glass was unavailable, people shifted towards the smaller options, but didn't then drink the equivalent amount of wine Eleni Mantzari While only modest, the finding could provide one way of nudging customers to drink less alcohol and have an impact at a population level, say the researchers.

Astronomy / Space - 18.01.2024
Galaxy mergers solve early Universe mystery
Galaxy mergers solve early Universe mystery
A team of astronomers, led by the University of Cambridge, has used the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope to reveal, for the first time, what lies in the local environment of galaxies in the very early Universe. This has solved one of the most puzzling mysteries in astronomy - why astronomers detect light from hydrogen atoms that should have been entirely blocked by the pristine gas that formed after the Big Bang.

Life Sciences - 18.01.2024
Research uncovers mechanism behind stubborn memories
Researchers from the Medical Research Council Brain Network Dynamics Unit at the University of Oxford and the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences have identified a novel mechanism by which the brain produces powerful lasting memories that drive ill-advised actions. Focussing on cocaine experience, the researchers demonstrate how the collective activity of many nerve cells distributed across the brain underlies the persistence of such memories, providing new insights into why drug-seeking behaviours could lead to addiction.

Health - Veterinary - 18.01.2024
New research highlights high risk of ear and eye disease in English Cocker Spaniels in the UK
New research highlights high risk of ear and eye disease in English Cocker Spaniels in the UK
New research from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) VetCompass? programme has found that English Cockers Spaniels have an increased risk of disorders such as ear discharge, dry eye and musculoskeletal pain, but have reduced risk of allergies, alopecia (hair loss) and osteoarthritis. This research will help vets, breeders and dog owners to predict what problems English Cocker Spaniels might develop, better monitor their health and promote earlier diagnosis.