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Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 03.07.2019
Blood pressure drug linked with increased risk of bowel condition | Imperial News | Imperial College London
Blood pressure drug linked with increased risk of bowel condition | Imperial News | Imperial College London
A type of blood pressure lowering medication, called a calcium-channel blocker, may be linked with increased risk of bowel condition diverticulosis. This condition causes small bulges or pouches to appear in the lining of the intestine. Particularly affecting the elderly (as many as 65 per cent of over 85s may be affected), diverticulosis can in some cases can lead to a medical emergency if the pouches become infected or burst.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.07.2019
Scientists hijack bacteria's homing ability
Scientists hijack bacteria’s homing ability
In a world first, scientists have found a new way to direct stem cells to heart tissue. The findings, led by researchers at the University of Bristol and published in Chemical Science, could radically improve the treatment for cardiovascular disease, which causes more than a quarter of all deaths in the UK (1).

Health - Pharmacology - 03.07.2019
Smartphone network helps uncover hundreds of anti-cancer molecules in our food
Smartphone network helps uncover hundreds of anti-cancer molecules in our food
A crowdsourcing project which uses thousands of idling smartphones has helped to uncover anti-cancer properties of everyday foods and medicines. The project, led by researchers at Imperial College London, uses artificial intelligence to crunch huge volumes of data on a ‘cloud computing' network of smartphones while they charge overnight.

Health - Innovation / Technology - 02.07.2019
NHS must take urgent steps to defend against hackers, says White Paper
NHS must take urgent steps to defend against hackers, says White Paper
The NHS remains vulnerable to cyber-attack, and must take urgent steps to defend against threats which could risk the safety of patients. This is the finding of a new White Paper on NHS Cyber Security presented at the House of Lords. For the safety of patients, it is critical to ensure that the data, devices and systems that uphold our NHS and therefore our nation's health are secure.

Physics - Computer Science / Telecom - 02.07.2019
Generation and sampling of quantum states of light in a silicon chip
Generation and sampling of quantum states of light in a silicon chip
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Technical University of Denmark have found a promising new way to build the next generation of quantum simulators combining light and silicon micro-chips. In the roadmap to develop quantum machines able to compete and overcome classical supercomputers in solving specific problems, the scientific community is facing two main technological challenges.

Health - Pharmacology - 01.07.2019
Heart attack patients with diabetes may benefit from cholesterol-lowering drug
Injections of a cholesterol-cutting drug could reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke in patients with diabetes who have had a recent heart attack. Regular injections of a cholesterol-cutting drug could reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke in patients with diabetes and who have had a recent heart attack.

Pedagogy - 28.06.2019
Lack of data on missing migrant children leads to gaps in protection
Lack of data on missing migrant children leads to gaps in protection
A new report highlights the need for better data on migrant deaths and disappearances, particularly those of missing migrant children. This year's Fatal Journeys 4 report , by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and co-edited by University of Bristol academic Ann Singleton , focuses on missing migrant children, giving the growing number embarking on dangerous migrant journeys.

Health - Physics - 28.06.2019
Mini 'magic' MRI scanner could diagnose knee injuries more accurately
Mini ’magic’ MRI scanner could diagnose knee injuries more accurately
Researchers at Imperial College London have developed a prototype mini MRI scanner that fits around a patient's leg. The team say the device - which uses so-called ‘magic angle' effect - could potentially help diagnose knee injuries more quickly, and more accurately. Knee injuries affect millions of people - and MRI scans are crucial to diagnosing the problem Dr Karyn Chappell Study author In a proof-of-concept study using animal knees, the results suggest the technology could be used to show all the structures of the knee.

Social Sciences - Politics - 27.06.2019
UK-first as 960,000 project explores integration in Bristol
A unique new project led by the University of Bristol has received a 960,000 boost to improve integration across Bristol by exploring how its citizens and communities share spaces and move around the city. University researchers on the 'Everyday Integration' project, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), will work with Bristol City Council and 29 community partners to identify existing best-practice and better understand how to overcome the various barriers people currently face.

Pedagogy - 27.06.2019
Low UVB exposure in pregnancy linked with higher risk of learning disabilities
Too little sunlight - and specifically UVB exposure - in pregnancy has been linked with a higher risk of learning disabilities. In a new study looking at more than 422,500 school-age children from across Scotland, researchers found that low UVB exposure during pregnancy was associated with risk of learning disabilities.

Business / Economics - 27.06.2019
US immigration judges make harsher decisions when they ’feel the heat’
The hotter the day the more likely US immigration judges are to make harsher decisions - a new study by the universities of Ottawa, Canada and Sussex, England can reveal. The study, published in the American Economic Journal: Applied Economics , analyses the impact of outdoor temperatures on high-stakes decisions made in 207,000 US immigration cases.

Health - 26.06.2019
Boosting the cancer-destroying ability of killer T-cells
More types of cancer could potentially be destroyed by patients' own immune cells, thanks to new research by Cardiff University. The team of researchers discovered that increasing the amount of the molecule L-selectin on T-cells can vastly improve their ability to fight solid tumours. Professor Ann Ager, from Cardiff University's Systems Immunity Research Institute, said: “These results mean that immunotherapy could be used to fight most cancers.

Life Sciences - 26.06.2019
Snails show that variety is the key to success if you want to remember more
Snails show that variety is the key to success if you want to remember more
A change is as good as a rest when it comes to remembering more, according to new research by neuroscientists at the University of Sussex. Dr Michael Crossley , Senior Research Fellow in Neuroscience, used pond snails to study the factors impacting on memory interference. He found that, when tasked with learning two similar things, snails were only able to store and recall the first memory.

Physics - 26.06.2019
Identifies Fukushima reactor material in environment
Identifies Fukushima reactor material in environment
Through the analysis of specific fallout particles in the environment, a joint UK-Japan team of scientists has uncovered new insights into the sequence of events that led to the Fukushima nuclear accident in March 2011. The multi-organisation research, led by Dr Peter Martin and Professor Tom Scott from the University of Bristol's South West Nuclear Hub in collaboration with scientists from Diamond Light Source, the UK's national synchrotron facility, and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), has been published today .

Palaeontology - 26.06.2019
Blue colour tones in fossilised prehistoric feathers
Blue colour tones in fossilised prehistoric feathers
Examining fossilised pigments, scientists from the University of Bristol have uncovered new insights into blue colour tones in prehistoric birds. For some time, paleontologists have known that melanin pigment can preserve in fossils and have been able to reconstruct fossil colour patterns. Melanin pigment gives black, reddish brown and grey colours to birds and is involved in creating bright iridescent sheens in bird feathers.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 25.06.2019
Shows how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the sea
The findings of a research expedition to coastal Greenland which examined, for the first time, how melting ice is affecting supplies of nutrients to the oceans has been published in the journal Progress in Oceanography. The European Research Council-funded expedition on board the RSS Discovery took place during the summer of 2017.

Social Sciences - 25.06.2019
Sussex academics lead on report to improve safeguarding in international development research
A report aiming to improve safeguarding in international development research has been produced by Sussex academics after they were commissioned by the UK Collaborative on Development Research (UKCDR). Dr David Orr from the School of Education and Social Work (ESW), Dr Synne Dyvik and Dr Gabrielle Daoust from the School of Global Studies, along with Sushri Sangita Puhan and Professor Janet Boddy also at ESW, were commissioned to conduct an independent evidence review into safeguarding issues that may arise in the international development research context.

Environment - 24.06.2019
Clouds dominate uncertainties in predicting future Greenland melt
Clouds dominate uncertainties in predicting future Greenland melt
New research led by climate scientists from the University of Bristol suggests that the representation of clouds in climate models is as, or more, important than the amount of greenhouse gas emissions when it comes to projecting future Greenland ice sheet melt. Recent research shows that the whole of the Greenland ice sheet could be gone within the next thousand years, raising global sea level by more than seven metres.

Environment - Social Sciences - 24.06.2019
Ancient intervention could boost dwindling water reserves in coastal Peru
Ancient intervention could boost dwindling water reserves in coastal Peru
Methods from 1,400 years ago could boost water availability during Lima's dry season, according to new Imperial College London research. Nestled between the Pacific Ocean and the Andes mountains , the people of Peru 's coastal region rely on surface water from the Andes for drinking water, industry, and animal and crop farming.

Life Sciences - 21.06.2019
Neuroscience research questions current alcohol limit
Neuroscience research questions current alcohol limit
New research by neuroscientists from the University of Sussex shows that drinking only one pint of beer or a large glass of wine is enough to significantly compromise a person's sense of agency. Sense of agency is the feeling of being in control of our actions. It is an important aspect of human social behaviour, as it implies knowledge of the consequences of those actions.

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