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Results 81 - 100 of 610.


Environment - Life Sciences - 22.03.2021
Global biodiversity awareness tracked with Wikipedia page views
Wikipedia page views could be used to monitor global awareness of biodiversity, proposes a research team from UCL, ZSL, and the RSPB. Using their new metric, the research team found that awareness of biodiversity is marginally increasing, but the rate of change varies greatly between different groups of animals, as they report in paper included in a special edition of Conversation Biology .

Health - 22.03.2021
International Review finds lack of evidence to endorse clinical use of medical cannabis for pain
New evidence from Bath's Centre for Pain Research challenges the effectiveness of cannabis-based medicine for treating chronic pain in adults and children. Last updated on Tuesday 23 March 2021 Researchers from the University of Bath's Centre for Pain Research have contributed to a major international review into the safety and efficacy of cannabinoids when used to treat pain, including chronic pain in children and adults.

Life Sciences - Environment - 21.03.2021
Lack of prey is causing puffin chicks to starve leading to population declines | University of Oxford
Lack of prey is causing puffin chicks to starve leading to population declines | University of Oxford
New research from the 's Department of Zoology has used innovative technology to study causes of declines in puffin populations in the northeast Atlantic, and found that a lack of prey near some major breeding colonies is driving puffin chicks to starve, ultimately leading to population declines. Puffin populations, especially in the northeast Atlantic, have been in decline for decades.

Health - 19.03.2021
COVID-19: Backlog of half-a-million endoscopies and rising
COVID-19: Backlog of half-a-million endoscopies and rising
A backlog of nearly half-a-million endoscopy procedures, essential for diagnosing gastrointestinal cancers and diseases*, has built up during the COVID-19 pandemic, finds a new analysis of NHS England data led by UCL researchers. The study, published in the Lancet Gastroenterology and Hepatology , shows the number of endoscopies being performed in April 2020, the month following the first lockdown, fell by over 90%.

Environment - 19.03.2021
Carbon uptake in re-growing Amazon forest threatened by climate and human disturbance
Carbon uptake in re-growing Amazon forest threatened by climate and human disturbance
Large areas of forests regrowing in the Amazon to help reduce carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, are being limited by climate and human activity. Large areas of forests regrowing in the Amazon to help reduce carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, are being limited by climate and human activity. The forests, which naturally regrow on land previously deforested for agriculture and now abandoned, are developing at different speeds.

Health - Social Sciences - 19.03.2021
Sharing a household with young children appears to put adults at no greater COVID-19 risk
A new study suggests adults living with children are at no greater risk of testing positive for COVID-19 - even during periods when schools are open and there is active transmission of SARS-CoV2 in the community. The research - led by the University of Glasgow in partnership with Public Health Scotland and published today in - also suggests the risk of testing positive with COVID-19 was actually lower for those adults living in a household with a child between the ages of 0 and 11, than it was for those in households without young children.

Psychology - Health - 19.03.2021
Psychologists report an error in the NICE guidelines for autism - Lancet Psychiatry Study
A new Lancet Psychiatry article highlights concerns over a commonly-used autism screening tool, 'AQ-10'. Last updated on Friday 19 March 2021 Reporting in the Lancet Psychiatry today, psychologists at the University of Bath highlight that a widely used technique for autism screening is being misused, which may have prevented many people from receiving an autism diagnosis over the past decade.

Social Sciences - 18.03.2021
What bonobos could tell us about adoption in humans
What bonobos could tell us about adoption in humans
We're part of an international team that has seen the first evidence of wild bonobo apes adopting infants who were born outside of their social group. Adoptive mothers in the wild are usually related to orphaned infants or sometimes young females will adopt orphans to improve their own maternal skills.

Social Sciences - Health - 18.03.2021
Significant concerns over growing scale of sex selective abortions in Nepal
New analysis from Dr Melanie Channon (Bath) and Dr Mahesh Puri from (CREHPA, Nepal) in BMJ-Open focuses on sex selective abortion in parts of the country. Last updated on Friday 19 March 2021 Detailed, new analysis published this week in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) Open highlights significant concerns about a growing issue of sex selective abortion of girls in Nepal.

Agronomy / Food Science - Economics / Business - 18.03.2021
Sugar Tax in Spain has led to only tiny reduction in calories in shopping basket
New research suggests sugar taxes only slightly changed consumer behaviour, arguing that a combination of different policies is fundamental to tackle obesity. Last updated on Friday 19 March 2021 The introduction of a sugar tax, increasing the price of fizzy drinks and other products high in sugar content, has had only a limited, moderate effect in shifting people's dietary habits and behaviours, according to a new study.

Social Sciences - 18.03.2021
Young people worried about catching up on their studies after lockdown, survey suggests
More than a quarter of secondary-age pupils in Wales were spending three days or less on school tasks during the first lockdown, research has shown. The survey, conducted by academics at Cardiff University, asked young people in years seven to 12 about their home learning experiences during summer last year, as well as focusing on their mental wellbeing and daily habits.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 17.03.2021
Analysis: Teenage mental health - how growing brains could explain emerging disorders
Mental health problems often emerge during adolescence, but it is still not fully understood why teenagers are so vulnerable to psychiatric illnesses, says Dr Tobias Hauser (UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology). Adolescence is the time when most mental health problems arise. Diagnoses of psychiatric illnesses increase across the board, with teenagers suffering not only from mood disorders such as depression, but also from the most pervasive psychiatric illnesses, such as schizophrenia or obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

Health - 17.03.2021
UK variant spread rapidly in care homes
The UK variant of SARS-CoV-2 spread rapidly in care homes in England in November and December last year, broadly reflecting its spread in the general population, according to a study by UCL researchers. The study, published as a letter in the New England Journal of Medicine , looked at positive PCR tests of care home staff and residents between October and December.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.03.2021
New study investigates how life on land recovered after “The Great Dying?
New study investigates how life on land recovered after “The Great Dying?
Over the course of Earth's history, several mass extinction events have destroyed ecosystems, including one that famously wiped out the dinosaurs. But none were as devastating as "The Great Dying," which took place 252 million years ago during the end of the Permian period. A new study , published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, shows in detail how life recovered in comparison to two smaller extinction events.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.03.2021
Scientists develop rapid test for diagnosis of rare set of genetic conditions
Researchers at Cardiff University and Queen Mary University of London have developed a rapid test for the diagnosis of a constellation of rare and debilitating genetic conditions. Telomeropathies are caused by premature shortening of the tips of chromosomes, the DNA molecules which contain our genetic information.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.03.2021
Melting glaciers could speed up carbon emissions
Melting glaciers could speed up carbon emissions
Melting glaciers could be triggering a 'feedback process' that causes further climate change, according to new research. An international research team led by the University has for the first time linked glacier-fed mountain rivers with higher rates of plant material decomposition, a major process in the global carbon cycle.

Sport - Health - 16.03.2021
The fitter you are the better you burn fat - new research
Two new studies from Bath physiologists find that the biggest predictors of people's ability to burn fat are their biological sex and fitness levels. Last updated on Tuesday 16 March 2021 Females who are fit and healthy tend to burn more fat when they exercise than men, according to new research from a team of sports nutritionists.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 16.03.2021
Lightning strikes played vital role in origins of life on Earth
Lightning strikes played vital role in origins of life on Earth
Lightning strikes were just as important as meteorites in creating the perfect conditions for life to emerge on Earth, geologists say. Minerals delivered to Earth in meteorites more than 4 billion years ago have long been advocated as key ingredients for the development of life on our planet. Scientists believed minimal amounts of these minerals were also brought to early Earth through billions of lightning strikes.

Health - Social Sciences - 16.03.2021
COVID-19 death rate among people in prison three times higher than public
People in prisons are at an increased risk of COVID-19 - with a death rate over three times higher than that of the general population - and should be made a vaccine priority, according to UCL-led team of researchers. In an article published today in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine , the research team reveals that there were 121 deaths related to COVID-19 among people in prisons in England and Wales between March 2020 and February 2021, representing a risk of dying 3.3 times higher than that of people of the same age and sex outside secure environments.

Social Sciences - 15.03.2021
Separating primary school children in preparation for SATs could be ’damaging’
A fear of poor SATs results is driving headteachers to separate pupils by ability despite the impact on children's self-esteem and confidence, according to a study by UCL researchers. The findings, published in in the peer-reviewed British Journal of Sociology of Education, provide new evidence of a high-stakes culture around testing where some pupils are prioritised above others and physically segregated from them.

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