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Results 61 - 80 of 597.


Microtechnics - 17.02.2021
Credit card-sized soft pumps power wearable artificial muscles
Credit card-sized soft pumps power wearable artificial muscles
Robotic clothing that is entirely soft and could help people to move more easily is a step closer to reality thanks to the development of a new flexible and lightweight power system for soft robotics. The discovery by a team at the University of Bristol could pave the way for wearable assist devices for people with disabilities and people suffering from age-related muscle degeneration.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 17.02.2021
Stonehenge first stood in Wales
Stonehenge first stood in Wales
Professor Mike Parker Pearson (UCL Institute of Archaeology) discusses his research which has found a dismantled stone circle in west Wales which was moved to Salisbury Plain and rebuilt as Stonehenge. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, whose History of the Kings of Britain was written in 1136, the mysterious monoliths at Stonehenge were first spirited there by the wizard Merlin, whose army stole them from a mythical Irish stone circle called the Giants' Dance.

Psychology - Health - 17.02.2021
Mental health disorders and alcohol misuse more common in LGB people
Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB*) people are significantly more likely to have mental health conditions and report alcohol and drug misuse than heterosexual people - finds a new study led by UCL researchers in collaboration with the University of East Anglia and City, University. The findings, published today in  Psychological Medicine , come despite apparently more tolerant societal attitudes towards same-sex relationships.

Health - Electroengineering - 17.02.2021
Engineers share DIY instructions for 3D-printed blood oxygen sensor
'Make-at-home' pulse oximeter that can help track Covid-19 symptoms shared by Bath engineers Last updated on Wednesday 17 February 2021 Designs for a low-cost, 3D-printed blood-oxygen sensor have been shared by University of Bath engineers to help in the fight against Covid-19. The do-it-yourself 'Open Oximeter' sensor, designed by a team of engineers and scientists, can be created by anyone with a 3D printer and basic electronics skills.

Career - Economics / Business - 16.02.2021
How has the pandemic impacted our wellbeing?
New research from Professor Roger Gill, helps us to understand the impact of ongoing Covid-19 restrictions on mental health and wellbeing. The study, delivered in partnership with Professor Matt Grawitch and colleagues at St Louis University in Missouri, surveyed people living and working across the UK, France, Germany, Canada and the US.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.02.2021
Higher Covid-19 risk for middle-aged people with type 2 diabetes
A large-scale analysis involving UCL and funded by Diabetes UK has found a disproportionately higher Covid-19 death risk in middle-aged people with type 2 diabetes, raising questions over vaccination strategies across Europe. The study, published in the journal Diabetologia , found that compared to people of a similar age without type 2 diabetes, the additional COVID-19 mortality risk from having type 2 diabetes increases the younger someone is.

Criminology / Forensics - 16.02.2021
Counterintuitive approach may improve eyewitness identification
Experts have devised a novel approach to selecting photos for police line-ups that helps witnesses identify culprits more reliably. In a paper published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , researchers - from the University of California San Diego and Duke University in the United States and the University of Birmingham in the U.K. show for the first time that selecting fillers who match a basic description of the suspect but whose faces are less similar, rather than more, leads to better outcomes than traditional approaches in the field.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.02.2021
Oxford-led technology to help those at high risk from COVID-19
Oxford-led technology to help those at high risk from COVID-19
Research led by Professor Julia Hippisley-Cox in the University of Oxford's Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, with collaborators across the UK, found that there are several health and personal factors which, when combined, could mean someone is at a higher risk from COVID-19. These include characteristics like age, ethnicity and BMI, as well as certain medical conditions and treatments.

Environment - 16.02.2021
New research shines light on future directions for cities on sustainability and climate action
What's in a word? 'Smart', 'eco' or 'future' cities? Around the world, numerous city initiatives have sprung up in recent years to signal their engagement with sustainable development and global climate change action.

Life Sciences - Physics - 16.02.2021
Visualisation of 'dancing DNA'
Visualisation of ’dancing DNA’
Videos showing for the first time how small circles of DNA adopt dance-like movements inside a cell have been developed by researchers in Yorkshire. The footage, created by a team of scientists from the Universities of Leeds, Sheffield and York, and recorded at UCL, is based on the highest resolution images of a single molecule of DNA ever captured.

Life Sciences - 15.02.2021
Tropical paper wasps babysit for neighbours
Tropical paper wasps babysit for neighbours
Wasps provide crucial support to their extended families by babysitting at neighbouring nests, according to new research by a team of biologists from the universities of Bristol, Exeter and UCL published today [15 February] in Nature Ecology and Evolution. The findings suggest that animals should often seek to help more distant relatives if their closest kin are less in need.

Physics - Computer Science - 15.02.2021
Light used to detect quantum information stored in 100,000 nuclear quantum bits
Light used to detect quantum information stored in 100,000 nuclear quantum bits
Researchers have found a way to use light and a single electron to communicate with a cloud of quantum bits and sense their behaviour, making it possible to detect a single quantum bit in a dense cloud. We don't have a way of 'talking' to the cloud and the cloud doesn't have a way of talking to us. But what we can talk to is an electron: we can communicate with it sort of like a dog that herds sheep Mete Atatüre The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, were able to inject a 'needle' of highly fragile quantum information in a 'haystack' of 100,000 nuclei.

Health - 15.02.2021
Let the immune cell see the virus: Scientists discover unique way to target common virus
Scientists at Cardiff University have discovered a unique way to target a common virus that affects one in 200 newborn babies in the UK but for which there is only limited treatment available. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a master at “hiding? from the body's immune system so antibodies and T-cells cannot attack it as they do in other viruses, like the current coronavirus.

Health - 12.02.2021
Prediabetes may be linked to worse brain health
Prediabetes may be linked to worse brain health
People with prediabetes, whose blood sugar levels are higher than normal, may have an increased risk of cognitive decline and vascular dementia, according to a new study led by UCL researchers.

Administration - 12.02.2021
Four fifths of police officers believe character and virtues is central to policing says new study by the University of Birmingham
Four fifths of police officers believe character and virtues is central to policing says new study by the University of Birmingham
Polling carried out in January 2021 by Portland Communications on behalf of the University of Birmingham has found that nearly four fifths (79%) of police officers in the UK believe that character and virtues is a central part of police training, in order to carry out their duties. The survey which was commissioned by the Jubilee Centre for Character and virtues also concluded that 76% of those interviewed agreed that the Covid-19 pandemic has made policing more complicated and challenging.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 12.02.2021
Astronomers identify new method of planet formation
Astronomers identify new method of planet formation
Scientists have suggested a new explanation for the abundance in intermediate-mass exoplanets - a long-standing puzzle in astronomy. In the last 25 years, scientists have discovered over 4000 planets outside our solar system. From relatively small rock and water worlds to blisteringly hot gas giants, these planets display a remarkable variety.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.02.2021
Scientists identify how harmless gut bacteria "turn bad"
Scientists have determined how harmless E. coli gut bacteria in chickens can easily pick up the genes required to evolve to cause a life-threatening infection. Last updated on Friday 12 February 2021 An international team of scientists has determined how harmless E. coli gut bacteria in chickens can easily pick up the genes required to evolve to cause a life-threatening infection.

Health - 12.02.2021
Visual hallucinations among blind people increase during pandemic
Visual hallucinations among blind people increase during pandemic
People with Charles Bonnet Syndrome, which involves visual hallucinations for people who have lost their sight, have had worsening symptoms during the pandemic, finds a study led by UCL researchers. The study of 45 patients from Moorfields Eye Hospital between June and July 2020, published in BMJ Open Ophthalmology , reports of harrowing increases in symptoms in over half of participants.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 12.02.2021
Women better at reading minds than men - new study
Bath psychologists have developed the first ever 'mind-reading questionnaire' to assess how well people understand what others are really thinking. Last updated on Friday 12 February 2021 A new approach to 'mind-reading' has been developed by researchers at the University of Bath, Cardiff, and London to improve how well we understand what others are thinking.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.02.2021
Tocilizumab reduces deaths in patients hospitalised with COVID-19
The Randomised Evaluation of COVID-19 Therapy (RECOVERY) has demonstrated that an anti-inflammatory treatment, tocilizumab, reduces the risk of death when given to hospitalised patients with severe COVID-19. The study also showed that tocilizumab shortens the time until patients are successfully discharged from hospital and reduces the need for a mechanical ventilator.

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