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Results 61 - 80 of 428.


Astronomy / Space Science - 04.10.2019
Observing the Cosmic Web
The Cosmic Web is believed to contain huge threads of gas that connect multiple galaxies across the universe. Now our astronomers have observed these threads extending over three million light years. This is the first time that the Cosmic Web has been imaged in such detail on large scales joining together several galaxies.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 03.10.2019
New 'fuzzy' dark matter research disrupts conventional thinking
New ’fuzzy’ dark matter research disrupts conventional thinking
New research conducted at the University of Sussex has simulated dark matter in a new way for the first time, disrupting conventional thinking about the make-up of the universe. The research, published in Physical Review Letters , was done alongside Princeton, Harvard, Cambridge and MIT universities and others.

Social Sciences - 03.10.2019
"Children’s voices" omitted from care records, UCL study finds
The social care records of looked-after children and young people need to include those children's voices, according to a collaborative research project led by UCL with the Care Leaver's Association and the charity Family Action. The MIRRA (Memory - Identity - Rights in Records - Access) project, led by Professor Elizabeth Shepherd (UCL Information Studies), collected interview and focus group data from more than 80 care leavers, social work practitioners and information professionals.

Astronomy / Space Science - 02.10.2019
The violent history of the big galaxy next door
The violent history of the big galaxy next door
Astronomers have pieced together the cannibalistic past of the neighbouring large galaxy Andromeda, which has set its sights on our Milky Way as the main course. The galactic detective work found that Andromeda has eaten several smaller galaxies during the past three billion years, with left-overs found in large streams of stars.

Health - 02.10.2019
Health worsens the longer you live in a deprived neighbourhood
Living in a deprived neighbourhood as a child can have negative effects on long-term health and the longer people stay in poor areas, the more likely they are to become ill, according to a UCL-led study. The international study, which is the first systematic review to bring together research on neighbourhood effects on health and well-being over the life course, is published today in the European Journal of Public Health.

Materials Science - 02.10.2019
New 3D printing technique for biomaterials
A new way of 3D printing soft materials such as gels and collagens offers a major step forward in the manufacture of artificial medical implants. Developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham, the technique could be used to print soft biomaterials that could be used to repair defects in the body.

Health - Pharmacology - 02.10.2019
Gut bacteria 'fingerprint' predicts radiotherapy side effects
Gut bacteria ’fingerprint’ predicts radiotherapy side effects
Scientists have conducted the first clinical study to show a link between types of gut bacteria and radiotherapy-induced gut damage. Taking a ‘fingerprint' of the mix of bacteria in the gut can indicate how susceptible individual cancer patients are to gut damage as a result of radiotherapy for prostate and gynaecological cancers, the new study shows.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 01.10.2019
'Poisoned arrowhead' used by warring bacteria could lead to new antibiotics
’Poisoned arrowhead’ used by warring bacteria could lead to new antibiotics
A weapon bacteria use to vanquish their competitors could be copied to create new forms of antibiotics, according to Imperial College London research. Researchers have uncovered a novel weapon in the arsenal of bacteria that works in a similar way to common antibiotics. By further understanding and characterizing the molecular targets of VgrG2b, and how the toxin works, this research would support the design of new antibiotics.

Health - 01.10.2019
Analysis: Having sex in older age could make you happier and healthier
Dr Sarah Jackson (UCL Epidemiology & Health) co-authors an article discussing new research which examines the importance of having sex in older age. Sexual activity is an essential part of intimate relationships, though it tends to decline as people get older. But although research shows that frequency of sexual activity can decrease with age, for many older people, sex still remains an important part of their life.

Law - 01.10.2019
Why our extreme porn laws need to change
A law against possession of rape pornography, introduced in 2015, is very rarely used with few charges and prosecutions. This is what our researchers have found after analysing data obtained through a Freedom of Information request. Police focus The research shows that during 2015-2017 the vast majority (85 per cent) of extreme pornography charges were for possessing bestiality porn with only one per cent of charges for rape pornography.

Pharmacology - Health - 30.09.2019
Microneedle biosensors accurately detect patient antibiotic levels in real-time
Microneedle biosensors accurately detect patient antibiotic levels in real-time
Scientists have successfully used microneedle biosensors to accurately detect changes in antibiotic levels in the body, for the first time. Small, non-invasive patches worn on the skin can accurately detect the levels of medication in a patient's system, matching the accuracy of current clinical methods.

Pharmacology - Health - 30.09.2019
Fruit flies live longer with combination drug treatment
Fruit flies live longer with combination drug treatment
A triple drug combination has been used to extend the lifespan of fruit flies by 48% in a new study led by UCL and the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing. The three drugs are all already in use as medical treatments: lithium as a mood stabiliser, trametinib as a cancer treatment and rapamycin as an immune system regulator.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.09.2019
Method discovered to reactivate tumour fighting genes ’silenced’ by cancer
Scientists at UCL have developed a method to reactivate 'tumour suppressor' genes, which are switched off by cancer cells - a finding which could lead to new targeted biotherapies for cancer. In the study, published in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology , researchers at UCL Cancer Institute and the Cancer Research UK UCL Centre aimed to identify ways to block the function of a regulatory protein called PRC2 (Polycomb repressive complex 2).

Life Sciences - 27.09.2019
Older male sparrows seem to father more chicks by getting more sperm to the egg
Older male sparrows seem to father more chicks by getting more sperm to the egg
Researchers are a step closer to solving the puzzle of why older male sparrows are more successful at mating and producing chicks. Older male sparrows appear to father more chicks than their younger counterparts when their female mates are monogamously ‘attached' to another male. This, according to new Imperial College London research, appears to be because older males manage to get more sperm to female eggs, which increases the chance of fertilisation.

Astronomy / Space Science - 27.09.2019
Earliest cluster of forming galaxies discovered 13 billion light-years away
Earliest cluster of forming galaxies discovered 13 billion light-years away
A 13-billion-year-old intense galaxy-forming region has been spotted, giving researchers clues as to how huge networks of galaxies develop. In the present universe, fully formed galaxy clusters contain thousands of member galaxies including tens of massive galaxies. These clusters are the largest astronomical objects in the universe.

Psychology - 27.09.2019
Teenagers less likely to respond to mothers with controlling tone of voice
Teenagers are less likely to cooperate and put effort into their mother's requests when they are said in a controlling tone of voice, researchers have found. Speaking to a son or daughter in a pressurising tone is also accompanied by a range of negative emotions and less feelings of closeness, a new study has discovered.

Health - Psychology - 26.09.2019
Abused or neglected children are four times more likely to develop serious mental illness
A study by the University of Birmingham has shown that children who have experienced child abuse or neglect are four times more likely to develop serious mental illness such as psychoses, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Researchers studied GP records dating between 1995 and 2018 of 217,758 patients aged under 18 who had experienced, or were suspected to have experienced, childhood maltreatment or related concerns, and then compared them to the records of 423,410 patients who had not.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.09.2019
New genes identified in hearing loss, providing treatment hope
New genes identified in hearing loss, providing treatment hope
Researchers have identified 44 genes linked to age-related hearing loss, giving a much clearer understanding of how the condition develops, in a new study led by UCL and King's College London. In the study, published today in The  American Journal of Human Genetics , researchers analysed the genetic data from over 250,000 participants of the UK Biobank aged 40-69 years to see which genes were associated with people who had reported having or not having hearing problems on questionnaire.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 26.09.2019
Ultra rare kaon decay could lead to evidence of new physics
Scientists searching for evidence of new physics in particle processes that could explain dark matter and other mysteries of the universe have moved one step closer, with the new result of the NA62 experiment reported today at CERN. An international team of scientists have succeeded in harnessing a new technique which captures and measures the ultra rare decay of a sub atomic particle called a kaon.

Environment - Palaeontology - 26.09.2019
Ecosystems take two million years to recover after mass extinctions
Ecosystems take two million years to recover after mass extinctions
It takes ecosystems two million years to recover after a mass extinction and for them to become functional and resilient again, according to new UCL co-led research. The study Hojung Kim and Dr Sarah Alvarez) and academics from Southampton, Frankfurt and California. The team looked at 13 million years' worth of fossil plankton records in the aftermath of near annihilation of ocean plankton, during the Cretaceous/Paleogene mass extinction, providing a remarkable glimpse into how the marine ecosystem 'reboots'.

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