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Results 61 - 80 of 615.


Health - Pharmacology - 31.08.2020
Implant choice more important than surgeon skill for hip replacement success
Implant choice more important than surgeon skill for hip replacement success
A study analysing over 650,000 hip replacement patients across England and Wales over 14 years sought to investigate why one hospital has consistently been identified as having better than expected outcomes compared to other settings. The findings have shown that the outstanding hip implant survival results seen in one centre in the UK are associated with implant choice more than surgeon skill.

Career - 28.08.2020
UK productivity could be improved by a permanent shift towards remote working
Nine out of ten employees who have worked at home during lockdown would like to continue doing so in some capacity, research suggests. The report, by academics at Cardiff University and the University of Southampton, presents the first analysis of employee survey data focusing on homeworking, which was gathered for the Understanding Society Covid-19 Study.

Health - Social Sciences - 28.08.2020
Nursery-based cooking programme reduces food fussiness in young children
Children aged three to fiveyears-old involved in a nursery-based cooking skills the Big Chef Little Chef (BCLC) programme were found to be less fussy and more willing to try green vegetables at the end of the study. The results of this quasi-experimental study evaluated by the University of Glasgow and published in the journal Nutrients - found that that there was a significant increase in willingness to try green vegetables, indicating the potential success of programmes such as Big Chef Little Chef (BCLC) to have positive effects on preschool children's diet and eating behaviours.

Environment - Life Sciences - 28.08.2020
Understanding past warming can limit climate change effects
Understanding past warming can limit climate change effects
Evidence from Earth's past warming events should be built into forecasts showing how today's climate change could affect different species and ecosystems. Durham's bioscientists were part of an international team of researchers that identified and examined past increases in temperature similar to those anticipated in the coming decades.

History / Archeology - Chemistry - 27.08.2020
Ceramic cooking pots record history of ancient food practices
Ceramic cooking pots record history of ancient food practices
Analysing three components of ceramic cooking pots - charred remains, inner surface residues and lipids absorbed within the ceramic walls - may help archaeologists uncover detailed timelines of culinary cooking practices used by ancient civilisations. The findings, from a year-long cooking experiment led by the University of California, University of Bristol and the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum in Hawaii, are published this week in the journal Scientific Reports .

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 27.08.2020
Majority of groundwater stores resilient to climate change
Majority of groundwater stores resilient to climate change
Fewer of the world's large aquifers are depleting than previously estimated, according to a new study by the University of Sussex and UCL. Groundwater, the world's largest distributed store of freshwater, plays a critical role in supplying water for irrigation, drinking and industry, and sustaining vital ecosystems.

Computer Science - Electroengineering - 27.08.2020
Brain-inspired electronic system could vastly reduce AI’s carbon footprint
Extremely energy-efficient artificial intelligence is now closer to reality after a study by UCL researchers found a way to improve the accuracy of a brain-inspired computing system. The system, which uses memristors to create artificial neural networks, is at least 1,000 times more energy efficient than conventional transistor-based AI hardware, but has until now been more prone to error.

Pedagogy - 26.08.2020
Low levels of wellbeing among children in Wales
Low levels of wellbeing among children in Wales
Children in Wales have some of the lowest levels of wellbeing among children across 35 countries, a team of Cardiff University researchers has found. The team, from the Wales Institute of Social and Economic Research and Data (WISERD), surveyed over 2,600 children from across Wales about their own happiness, satisfaction and psychological wellbeing, as well as how respected they feel and their inclusion in decision-making processes.

Environment - Health - 26.08.2020
Address major holes in ozone hole treaty to avert stronger climate change and serious health risks, experts warn
Address major holes in ozone hole treaty to avert stronger climate change and serious health risks, experts warn
A new paper, co-authored by a University of Sussex scientist, has revealed major holes in an international treaty designed to help repair the ozone layer, putting human health at risk and increasing the speed of climate change. Evidence amassed by scientists in the 1970s and 1980s showed that the depletion of the ozone layer in the stratosphere was one of the first truly global threats to humanity.

Life Sciences - 26.08.2020
How effective are primate conservation measures?
With about 60 per cent of the world's primate species threatened with extinction, conservation efforts are now more important than ever. However, research by a team of world-renowned experts in 21 countries including one of our anthropology experts at Durham, has found that conservation measures are hardly ever evaluated, meaning we rarely know which ones work and which ones don't.

Life Sciences - 25.08.2020
Understand what works when trying to protect monkeys and apes, say scientists
Understand what works when trying to protect monkeys and apes, say scientists
Despite significant protection efforts, global populations of monkeys and apes are declining dramatically. A new study has found that the effectiveness of protection measures is rarely evaluated, and calls for an evidence-based approach to future conservation efforts to prevent imminent extinctions. Our findings imply that many primate conservation activities are carried out without demonstrably knowing if they have worked or not in other similar situations.

Health - 25.08.2020
Blood cancer patients are most vulnerable to COVID-19
A newly published study led by the Universities of Oxford and Birmingham has found that, compared to other cancers, patients with blood cancers are more vulnerable to the effects of the coronavirus pandemic. As access to treatment remains of upmost importance, this information will help clinicians to guide patients to ensure they can have therapy safely and successfully during this time.

Health - 25.08.2020
Two different techniques can effectively treat lower tract symptoms
New research has shown two procedures to treat men with an enlarged prostate gland are both effective. The trial compared the current -gold- standard treatment of TURP (Transurethral Resection of the Prostate) to a laser technique called ThuVARP (Thulium Laser Transurethral Vaporesection of the Prostate).

Pharmacology - Health - 25.08.2020
Better drug treatment for miscarriage as patients struggle to access surgery in Covid-19 pandemic
The trial found that the combined drug treatment worked in 83% of cases, compared to 76% in the placebo group - and crucially, it reduced the need for surgery. A new drug combination is more effective for women having miscarriages without symptoms than current standard NHS treatment, according to an NIHR funded study from Tommy's National Centre for Miscarriage Research published today in The Lancet.

Health - 25.08.2020
Which cancer patients are more vulnerable to COVID-19
A newly published study led by the Universities of Oxford and Birmingham has found that, compared to other cancers, patients with blood cancers are more vulnerable to the effects of the coronavirus pandemic. As access to treatment remains of upmost importance, this information will help clinicians to guide patients to ensure they can have therapy safely and successfully during this time.

Health - 24.08.2020
Three quarters of patients report long-term effects of coronavius
Three quarters of a group of patients who received care for coronavirus at Bristol's Southmead Hospital were still suffering ongoing symptoms three months later, a study published on the pre-print server medRxi has found. Researchers at North Bristol NHS Trust found that 81 out of 110 discharged patients were still experiencing symptoms such as breathlessness, excessive fatigue and muscle aches when invited back to clinic.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 24.08.2020
New insights into lithium-ion battery failure mechanism
Researchers have identified a potential new degradation mechanism for electric vehicle batteries - a key step to designing effective methods to improve battery lifespan. The researchers, from the Universities of Cambridge and Liverpool, and the Diamond Light Source, have identified one of the reasons why state-of-the-art 'nickel-rich' battery materials become fatigued, and can no longer be fully charged after prolonged use.

Environment - Chemistry - 24.08.2020
Wireless device makes clean fuel from sunlight, CO2 and water
Researchers have developed a standalone device that converts sunlight, carbon dioxide and water into a carbon-neutral fuel, without requiring any additional components or electricity. We hope this technology will pave the way toward sustainable and practical solar fuel production Erwin Reisner The device, developed by a team from the University of Cambridge, is a significant step toward achieving artificial photosynthesis - a process mimicking the ability of plants to convert sunlight into energy.

Health - Pharmacology - 24.08.2020
Using hydroxychloroquine with common antibiotic increases cardiovascular risk
The combination of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin has been linked to significant cardiovascular risks, including mortality, in the largest safety study ever performed comparing hydroxychloroquine treatment to hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin treatment for rheumatoid arthritis patients. Hydroxychloroquine is commonly used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, while azithromycin is a frequently-prescribed antibiotic to treat infections such as pneumonia, chest and sinus infections, etc.

Physics - 24.08.2020
Study enables predicting computational power of early quantum computers
Study enables predicting computational power of early quantum computers
Sussex study enables predicting computational power of early quantum computers University of Sussex quantum physicists have developed an algorithm which helps early quantum computers to perform calculations most efficiently The team used their model to calculate the expected computational power of early quantum computers Their research highlights a fundamental advantage of the ‘trapped ion' approach over other methods Quantum physicists at

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