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Results 61 - 80 of 447.


Health - Veterinary - 19.05.2023
English Cocker Spaniels - a fairly typical, but potentially moody, dog
English Cocker Spaniels - a fairly typical, but potentially moody, dog
A new study from the Royal Veterinary College illuminates the most common disorders in English Cocker Spaniels in the UK, aiding owners to know what to expect if they get this breed New research from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) has found the most common conditions in one the UK's most popular dog breeds, English Cocker Spaniels, include dental disease, ear infection, obesity and aggression.

Chemistry - Environment - 18.05.2023
Driving on sunshine: clean, usable liquid fuels made from solar power
Driving on sunshine: clean, usable liquid fuels made from solar power
Researchers have developed a solar-powered technology that converts carbon dioxide and water into liquid fuels that can be added directly to a car-s engine as drop-in fuel. Shining sunlight on the artificial leaves and getting liquid fuel from carbon dioxide and water is an amazing bit of chemistry Motiar Rahaman The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, harnessed the power of photosynthesis to convert CO2, water and sunlight into multicarbon fuels - ethanol and propanol - in a single step.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.05.2023
New ’microwave’ medical treatment shows promise for patients with HPV
An innovative new medical device which uses microwave heating has shown promising potential for treating precancers and cancers caused by infection with human papillomavirus (HPV). The results - led by the MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research (CVR) and published in Lancet eBioMedicine - used 3D 'living skin' in laboratory models of HPV-infected tissues and found that microwave treatment resulted in precise, localised cell death in these tissues without damaging the surrounding areas.

Environment - Life Sciences - 18.05.2023
Climate change to push species over abrupt tipping points
Climate change to push species over abrupt tipping points
Climate change is likely to abruptly push species over tipping points as their geographic ranges reach unforeseen temperatures, finds a new study led by a UCL researcher. The new Nature Ecology & Evolution study predicts when and where climate change is likely to expose species across the globe to potentially dangerous temperatures.

Astronomy / Space Science - 17.05.2023
First radio detection of Type Ia supernova explosion captured by e-MERLIN telescope at Jodrell Bank
After decades of trying, astronomers have found the origin of a Type Ia supernova explosion using radio emissions, thanks to the e-MERLIN telescope network based at Jodrell Bank , The University of Manchester. A supernova is a powerful and luminous explosion and is the end of a star's life. In the case of Type 1a supernovae, they can be used to measure distances in the Universe or for the study of dark energy.

Pharmacology - Health - 17.05.2023
Non-antibiotic treatment for women with persistent acne shown to be effective
A team of researchers led by the University of Southampton has shown that a cheap and readily available drug, used to treat high blood pressure, could help the thousands of women who suffer from persistent acne. The SAFA study, funded by the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR), is the first large-scale clinical trial to provide evidence that spironolactone is an effective treatment for the skin condition.

Pharmacology - Health - 17.05.2023
Patients with rheumatic and musculoskeletal conditions vulnerable to long term opioid use
Up to 1 in 3 with rheumatoid arthritis or fibromyalgia starting an opioid for the first time may be at risk, warn researchers Patients with rheumatic and musculoskeletal conditions are vulnerable to long term opioid use, with up to 1 in 3 of those with rheumatoid arthritis or fibromyalgia potentially at risk, suggest researchers at The University of Manchester The findings, published in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases show people with rheum

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 17.05.2023
Fossil of mosasaur with bizarre 'screwdriver teeth' found in Morocco
Fossil of mosasaur with bizarre ’screwdriver teeth’ found in Morocco
Scientists have discovered a new species of rare mosasaur in Morocco, adding to evidence of the vast diversity of these marine reptiles 66 million years ago. Scientists have discovered a new species of mosasaur, a sea-dwelling lizard from the age of the dinosaurs, with strange, ridged teeth unlike those of any known reptile.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 16.05.2023
JUICE magnetometer passes fitness tests and is ready to take data
JUICE magnetometer passes fitness tests and is ready to take data
The magnetometer instrument on the JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) spacecraft has been rigorously tested and is ready to fulfil its mission. The magnetometer instrument (J-MAG), led by Imperial College London researchers, consists of three sensors, all of which were shown to be operating well. The deployment also marks the first time a quantum interference sensor - a precise but delicate technology - has been used beyond Earth orbit.

Innovation - Physics - 16.05.2023
Shaping the technologies of the future
Shaping the technologies of the future
A new method of controlling the shape of tiny particles about one tenth of the width of human hair could make the technology that powers our daily lives more stable and more efficient, scientists claim. The process, which transforms the structure of microscopic semiconductor materials known as quantum dots, provides industry with opportunities to optimise optoelectronics, energy harvesting, photonics, and biomedical imaging technologies, according to the Cardiff University-led team.

Health - Career - 15.05.2023
Home working didn't harm mental health at the start of the pandemic
Home working didn’t harm mental health at the start of the pandemic
Writing in The Conversation, Dr Jacques Wels (UCL MRC Unit for Lifelong Health & Ageing) shares his new research which found home working was not detrimental to mental health in the early stages of the pandemic, but was associated with negative effects later on. One of the key changes to our daily lives brought about by the COVID pandemic was, for those able to do so, working from home.

Health - 15.05.2023
2m boost for study to detect early stage ovarian cancer
NHS Cancer Programme funding will see an advanced test used at GP surgeries in the West Midlands to diagnose early-stage ovarian cancer. A 2 million study will see an advanced test used at GP surgeries in the West Midlands to diagnose early-stage ovarian cancer - potentially saving thousands of lives a year.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 12.05.2023
Shining ring around black holes recreated in the lab
Shining ring around black holes recreated in the lab
Researchers have created a spinning disc of plasma in a lab, mimicking discs found around black holes and forming stars. The experiment more accurately models what happens in these plasma discs, which could help researchers discover how black holes grow and how collapsing matter forms stars. As matter approaches black holes it heats up, becoming plasma - a fourth state of matter consisting of charged ions and free electrons.

Astronomy / Space Science - 12.05.2023
Largest cosmic explosion ever seen
Largest cosmic explosion ever seen
A team of astronomers led by the University of Southampton have uncovered the largest cosmic explosion ever witnessed. The explosion is more than ten times brighter than any known supernova (exploding star) and three times brighter than the brightest tidal disruption event, where a star falls into a supermassive black hole.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.05.2023
Obesity accelerates loss of COVID-19 vaccination immunity
Obesity accelerates loss of COVID-19 vaccination immunity
The protection offered by COVID-19 vaccination declines more rapidly in people with severe obesity than in those with normal weight, scientists at the Universities of Cambridge and Edinburgh have found. The study suggests that people with obesity are likely to need more frequent booster doses to maintain their immunity.

Health - 11.05.2023
Risk of long COVID higher for people living in most deprived areas
New research led by the universities of Southampton and Oxford has found that the risk of long COVID is strongly associated with area-level deprivation, with the odds of having long COVID 46 percent higher for people from the most deprived areas, compared to those in the least deprived areas. Published in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine , the study analysed over 200,000 working-age adults and is the first to quantify the association between long COVID and socioeconomic status across a range of occupation sectors.

Physics - Materials Science - 10.05.2023
Sustainable solar cell material shown to be highly promising for medical imaging
Sustainable solar cell material shown to be highly promising for medical imaging
Using X-rays to see inside the human body has revolutionised non-invasive medical diagnostics. However, the dose of X-rays required for imaging is far higher than background levels, due to the poor performance of the detector materials currently available. This can cause harm to patients, and in some cases even cancer.

Health - 10.05.2023
Variants of COVID-19 in cats followed the same timeline as the human population
Household cats acquired the same COVID-19 variants as their owners throughout the pandemic, according to new research. The study, published in Emerging Infectious Diseases and led by the MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research (CVR) - where scientists first detected human-to-cat COVID-19 transmission in April 2021 - found a retrospective association between the dominant SARS-CoV-2 variant observed in cats and the timeline of variant emergence in the human population.

Pharmacology - Health - 10.05.2023
Most antidepressants prescribed for chronic pain lack reliable evidence of efficacy or safety, scientists warn
Most antidepressants prescribed for chronic pain lack reliable evidence of efficacy or safety, scientists warn
Most antidepressants used for chronic pain are being prescribed with "insufficient" evidence of their effectiveness, scientists have warned. A major investigation into medications used to manage long-term pain found that harms of many of the commonly recommended drugs have not been well studied. The Cochrane review, led by scientists from several UK universities including Southampton and Newcastle, examined 176 trials consisting of nearly 30,000 patients involved in assessments which prescribed antidepressants for chronic pain.

Life Sciences - 09.05.2023
Nose shape gene inherited from Neanderthals
Nose shape gene inherited from Neanderthals
Humans inherited genetic material from Neanderthals that affects the shape of our noses, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The new study finds that a particular gene, which leads to a taller nose (from top to bottom), may have been the product of natural selection as ancient humans adapted to colder climates after leaving Africa.