Category


Years
2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009


Results 61 - 80 of 346.


Life Sciences - 25.07.2019
Strange bacteria hint at ancient origin of photosynthesis
Structures inside rare bacteria are similar to those that power photosynthesis in plants today, suggesting the process is older than assumed. The finding could mean the evolution of photosynthesis needs a rethink, turning traditional ideas on their head. We're beginning to see that much of the established story about the evolution of photosynthesis is not supported by the real data Dr Tanai Cardona Photosynthesis is the ability to use the Sun's energy to produce sugars via chemical reactions.

Mechanical Engineering - 25.07.2019
Supercomputers use graphics processors to solve longstanding turbulence question
Supercomputers use graphics processors to solve longstanding turbulence question
Advanced simulations have solved a problem in turbulent fluid flow that could lead to more efficient turbines and engines. When a fluid, such as water or air, flows fast enough, it will experience turbulence - seemingly random changes in velocity and pressure within the fluid. From my first days studying fluid mechanics I had some fundamental questions that I wanted to know the answers to.

Chemistry - 25.07.2019
Shape shifting protocells hint at the mechanics of early life
Shape shifting protocells hint at the mechanics of early life
Inspired by the processes of cellular differentiation observed in developmental biology, an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Bristol have demonstrated a new spontaneous approach to building communities of cell-like entities (protocells) using chemical gradients.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.07.2019
Hijacking the hijackers: new clue to understand antibiotic resistance
Scientists at the University of Glasgow have found a new paradigm in the understanding of bacterial evolution - an important element in the wider context of antibiotic resistance. The ability of most bacterial pathogens to cause disease depends on the presence of a class of genetic elements called "pathogenicity islands".

Health - Environment - 23.07.2019
Air pollution in US associated with 30,000 deaths and reduced life expectancy
Air pollution in US associated with 30,000 deaths and reduced life expectancy
Air quality in the US may be linked with increased mortality and reduced life expectancy according to new research. The study, published in the journal PLOS Medicine and led by Imperial College London and the Center for Air, Climate and Energy Solutions at Carnegie Mellon University , analysed concentrations of fine particles in the air, called PM2.5, across all counties in the contiguous USA (excluding Alaska and Hawaii) between 1999 and 2015.

Computer Science / Telecom - Administration - 23.07.2019
Anonymising personal data 'not enough to protect privacy', shows new study
Anonymising personal data ’not enough to protect privacy’, shows new study
Current methods for anonymising data leave individuals at risk of being re-identified, according to new UCLouvain and Imperial research. Companies and governments downplay the risk of re-identification by arguing that the datasets they sell are always incomplete. Our findings show this might not help.

Health - 23.07.2019
Community-wide HIV testing shown to be cost-effective
Community-wide HIV testing shown to be cost-effective
Community-wide HIV testing and prompt initiation of treatment could lead to substantial reductions in new HIV cases and be cost-effective. This is according to projections from mathematical modelling and cost-effectiveness analyses presented at the 10 th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Science in Mexico City.

Social Sciences - 19.07.2019
Left wing radicalism linked to sympathy for violent extremism
The more strongly someone agrees with the ideas of revolutionary left-wing groups, the more likely they are to sympathise with violent extremism, finds a first of-its-kind study. The new report , by academics at the University of Bristol, Goldsmiths and King's College London, used an innovative survey to measure sympathy for violent extremism and alignment with values similar to those promoted by revolutionary left-wing groups.

Health - Administration - 18.07.2019
Salt rules linked to 9900 cases of cardiovascular disease and 1500 cancer cases
Salt rules linked to 9900 cases of cardiovascular disease and 1500 cancer cases
A relaxation of UK food industry regulation has been linked with 9,900 additional cases of cardiovascular disease, and 1,500 cases of stomach cancer. Researchers from Imperial College London and the University of Liverpool analysed the salt intake of the population in England over thirteen years to compare the effect of changes in regulations on how much salt manufacturers can use in their products.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.07.2019
Top Ten Organisations for Animal Research Announced
Understanding Animal Research, an organisation promoting greater openness about animal research, has today released a list of the ten organisations in Great Britain that carry out the highest number of animal procedures - those used in medical, veterinary and scientific research. These statistics are freely available on the organisations' websites as part of their ongoing commitment to transparency and openness around the use of animals in research.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.07.2019
Omega-6 fatty acid could help prevent heart disease
An omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid has the potential to help fight heart disease, finds a new study by researchers at Cardiff University in collaboration with Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. With funding from the British Heart Foundation, the team found that dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA), an omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid, could halt the progression of atherosclerosis - one of the leading causes of heart disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.07.2019
Higher iron levels may boost heart health - but also increase risk of stroke
Scientists have helped unravel the protective ' and potentially harmful ' effect of iron in the body. In a series of early-stage studies examining genetic data from over 500,000 people, a team of international scientists, led by Imperial College London, explored the role that iron plays in over 900 diseases.

Pharmacology - Health - 15.07.2019
Science of microdosing psychedelics ’remains patchy and anecdotal’, says review
The practice of taking small, regular doses of psychedelic drugs to enhance mood, creativity, or productivity lacks robust scientific evidence. The process, called microdosing, has been lauded by some, with high profile proponents in Silicon Valley. But to date, scientific evidence to support or even fully explore claims of the benefits and safety, has been lacking.

Physics - 12.07.2019
Image of quantum entanglement
For the first time ever, physicists have managed to take a photo of a strong form of quantum entanglement called Bell entanglement - capturing visual evidence of an elusive phenomenon which a baffled Albert Einstein once called 'spooky action at a distance'. Two particles which interact with each other - like two photons passing through a beam splitter, for example - can sometimes remain connected, instantaneously sharing their physical states no matter how great the distance which separates them.

Pharmacology - Health - 11.07.2019
Reducing antibiotic use
Reducing antibiotic use
A simple finger-prick blood test could help prevent unnecessary prescribing of antibiotics for people with the lung condition chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a new study by researchers from Cardiff University, University of Oxford and King's College London. The team demonstrated that using a CRP finger-prick blood test resulted in 20% fewer people using antibiotics for COPD flare-ups.

Pharmacology - Health - 10.07.2019
Patients with mental health conditions denied access to ’best available’ stop smoking treatments
A new study from researchers at the universities of Bristol and Bath suggests that doctors should rethink which drugs they prescribe to help smokers with mental health conditions kick the habit. Their results highlight that the most effective drug at helping individuals to stop smoking is less likely to be prescribed to people with mental health conditions.

Environment - 10.07.2019
Best male biathletes 'more attractive'
Best male biathletes ’more attractive’
Top male biathletes are more attractive to the opposite sex, according to a new study by scientists at the universities of Exeter and Bristol. This result, say the team, fits with the theory that women have an evolved preference for more athletic men, who in past times were better able to provide for their families.

Physics - 10.07.2019
Quantum sensor breakthrough using naturally occurring vibrations in artificial atoms
Quantum sensor breakthrough using naturally occurring vibrations in artificial atoms
A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, have discovered a new method that could be used to build quantum sensors with ultra-high precision. When individual atoms emit light, they do so in discrete packets called photons. When this light is measured, this discrete or ‘granular' nature leads to especially low fluctuations in its brightness, as two or more photons are never emitted at the same time.

Innovation / Technology - Environment - 09.07.2019
Making sense of science
A University of Sussex professor has helped draw up new guidance to aid European policymakers in making better informed decisions on issues of complex scientific evidence. Professor Andy Stirling has contributed to the new report Making Sense of Science by Science Advice for Policy by European Advisors (SAPEA) which brings together outstanding expertise in engineering, humanities, medicine, natural and social sciences from over 100 academies, young academies and learned societies across Europe.

Physics - Innovation / Technology - 08.07.2019
New Semiconductor Technology for Future Data Communications
New Semiconductor Technology for Future Data Communications
Researchers have developed world-leading Compound Semiconductor (CS) technology that can drive future high-speed data communications. A team from Cardiff University worked to innovate an ultrafast and highly sensitive ‘avalanche photodiode' (APD) that creates less electronic ‘noise' than its silicon rivals.

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |
 
/bin/cat /www/cms/admin/geodata/worldcitiespop.txt | egrep -ai '^uk,' > '/www/cms/admin/geodata/uk_cities.txt'