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Results 41 - 60 of 455.


Health - Life Sciences - 25.01.2023
Research by the RVC explores link between parasitic infection and stunted growth in children
Analysis of current literature and research by the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) has revealed there are various pathways which connect parasitic infection to stunting. The findings suggest that human exposure to parasitic disease from conception through to two years of age may contribute to childhood stunting.

Life Sciences - 24.01.2023
Polygamous birds have fewer harmful mutations
Polygamous birds have fewer harmful mutations
New study led by the Milner Centre for Evolution suggests polygamy increases the efficiency of natural selection by reducing harmful mutations. Bird species that breed with several sexual partners have fewer harmful mutations, according to a study led by the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 24.01.2023
Space collaboration including Sussex scientist makes icy discovery which sheds light on the building blocks of life
In a development believed to shed light on the building blocks of life, an international team of scientists, including Prof Wendy Brown from the University of Sussex, has discovered diverse ices in the darkest, coldest regions of space so-far measured, which are around 500 light years from Earth. The discovery within a molecular cloud was made by scientists from the IceAge project, an international consortium of academics using the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), to observe the building blocks of life.

Physics - Chemistry - 24.01.2023
Scientists open new window on the physics of glass formation
Research from an international team of scientists has cast new light on the physics of vitrification - the process by which glass forms. Their findings, which centre on analysis of a common feature of glasses called the boson peak, could help pave the way for new developments in materials science. The peak can be observed in glass when special equipment is used to study the vibrations of its constituent atoms, where it spikes in the terahertz range.

Health - Psychology - 24.01.2023
Generational inequalities in mental health accelerated during Covid-19 pandemic
Generational inequalities in mental health accelerated during Covid-19 pandemic
Core symptoms of anxiety and depression were more common among younger generations compared to older age groups during the COVID-19 outbreak - with the gap between young and old widening further during the pandemic, according to a new study by UCL and King's College London. Published today in Psychological Medicine, the study explores data from 26,772 people living in the UK across five different birth cohort studies - following those born in 1946, 1958, 1970, 1989-90 and 2000-02.

Health - Career - 24.01.2023
Impact of high GP turnover on service and health
A new study by University of Manchester researchers has revealed the stark impact that high turnover of GPs has on patients' health outcomes and the service they receive in England. The analysis found that 'persistent high turnover', defined by the researchers as when more than 10% of GPs changed in a practice in at least 3 consecutive years - was not uncommon.

Life Sciences - 24.01.2023
Attitude towards science depends on what you think you know, rather than what you actually know
Attitude towards science depends on what you think you know, rather than what you actually know
Survey of over 2,000 adults in the UK identifies potential pitfalls of science communication. Why do people hold highly variable attitudes towards well-evidenced science? For many years researchers focused on what people know about science, thinking that -to know science is to love it-. But do people who think they know science actually know science?

Social Sciences - 24.01.2023
Feature: Preserving endangered languages as 3D shapes
Feature: Preserving endangered languages as 3D shapes
Half of the world's languages are endangered and more than a thousand are expected to be lost in coming decades. A team at UCL is using animation software to preserve these languages in an entirely new way. It's estimated that there are over 7,000 documented languages spoken across the world. Yet around half of these languages are endangered.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.01.2023
DNA sequencing method lifts ’veil’ from genome black box
Many life-saving drugs directly interact with DNA to treat diseases such as cancer, but scientists have struggled to detect how and why they work - until now. In a paper published in the journal Nature Biotechnology , University of Cambridge researchers have outlined a new DNA sequencing method that can detect where and how small molecule drugs interact with the targeted genome.

Health - Pharmacology - 23.01.2023
COVID-19 patients may retain elevated risk of death 18 months after infection
COVID-19 patients may retain elevated risk of death 18 months after infection
COVID-19 is associated with higher risks of cardiovascular disease and death in the shortand long-term, according to a study in nearly 160,000 unvaccinated participants co-led by a UCL researcher. The study, published today in Cardiovascular Research , a journal of the European Society of Cardiology, investigated outcomes in a group of adults mostly aged in their 60s.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.01.2023
Split-second of evolutionary cellular change could have led to mammals
A newly-published hypothesis, led by a UCL researcher, suggests a momentary leap in a single species on a single day millions of years ago might ultimately have led to the arrival of mammals - and therefore humans. Published in the Journal of Cell Science , Professor John Martin (UCL Division of Medicine) thinks a single genetic molecular event (inheritable epigenetic change) in an egg-laying animal may have resulted in the first formation of blood platelets, approximately 220 million years ago.

Pharmacology - Psychology - 23.01.2023
Scientists explain emotional 'blunting' caused by common antidepressants
Scientists explain emotional ’blunting’ caused by common antidepressants
Scientists have worked out why common anti-depressants cause around a half of users to feel emotionally -blunted-. In a study published today, they show that the drugs affect reinforcement learning, an important behavioural process that allows us to learn from our environment. According to the NHS, more than 8.3 million patients in England received an antidepressant drug in 2021/22.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.01.2023
Wearable tech, AI and clinical teams join to change the face of trial monitoring
A multi-disciplinary team of researchers has developed a way to monitor the progression of movement disorders using motion capture technology and AI.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.01.2023
Wearable tech, AI and clinical teams combine to change the face of clinical trial monitoring
Wearable tech, AI and clinical teams combine to change the face of clinical trial monitoring
A multi-disciplinary team of researchers, involving several UCL scientists, has developed a way to monitor the progression of movement disorders using motion capture technology and AI.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.01.2023
Brain health ’Check-in’ tool to help reduce dementia risk
A free new digital tool has been launched by Alzheimer's Research UK, supported by evidence from UCL researchers, to help people keep their brain healthy and reduce their dementia risk. Only 2% of the public are doing everything they can to keep their brains healthy, according to new figures released by the charity.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.01.2023
Role of lymphatic system in bone healing revealed
Role of lymphatic system in bone healing revealed
It was previously assumed that bones lacked lymphatic vessels, but new research from the MRC Human Immunology Unit  at Oxford's MRC Weatherall Institute for Molecular Medicine  not only locates them within bone tissue, but demonstrates their role in bone and blood cell regeneration and reveals changes associated with aging.

Health - Pharmacology - 20.01.2023
’Remarkable’ results in colon cancer trial
Giving colon cancer patients chemotherapy before surgery cuts the risk of the disease coming back, according to the results of a new clinical trial. The FOxTROT trial, a collaborative study by scientists at Leeds and the University of Birmingham, showed that giving colon cancer patients chemotherapy before rather than after surgery reduced the chance of cancer returning within 2 years by 28%.

Chemistry - Innovation - 20.01.2023
Researchers unravel the complex reaction pathways in zero carbon fuel synthesis
Researchers have used isotopes of carbon to trace how carbon dioxide emissions could be converted into low-carbon fuels and chemicals. The result could help the chemical industry, which is the third largest subsector in terms of direct CO2 emissions, recycle its own waste using current manufacturing processes.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.01.2023
How post-feeding breasts bounce back from the brink of death to kick-start milk production
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered a protein that kick-starts milk production after breastfeeding has paused The team found the Rac1 protein which turns milk-secreting cells into cannibalistic cell eaters to clear up dead cells and remove surplus milk, also kick-starts milk production after temporary pauses The groundbreaking study provides new insights into how breast cancer cells might acquire resistance to cell death

Health - Pharmacology - 20.01.2023
Does COVID really damage your immune system and make you more vulnerable to infections? The evidence is lacking
Over the past month or two, many northern hemisphere countries including the US and the UK have seen a large wave of respiratory viral infections. These include RSV ( respiratory syncytial virus ), flu and COVID in all ages, as well as bacterial infections such as strep A in children. Sometimes these infections can be very serious.