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Results 41 - 60 of 559.


Life Sciences - Environment - 27.03.2020
Scientists document seasonal migrations of fish across the deep-sea floor for the first time
Scientists have, for the first time, documented seasonal migrations of fish across the seafloor in deep-sea fish, revealing an important insight that will further scientific understanding of the nature of our planet. The study - published today in the Journal of Animal Ecology and led by the University of Glasgow and Nova Southeastern University in Florida - analysed over seven years of deep-sea photographic data from West Africa, linking seasonal patterns in surface-ocean productivity with observed behavioural patterns of fishes at 1500 metres.

Life Sciences - Environment - 27.03.2020
Scientists predict the size of plastics animals can eat
A team of scientists at Cardiff University has, for the first time, developed a way of predicting the size of plastics different animals are likely to ingest. The researchers, from the University's Water Research Institute, looked at the gut contents of more than 2,000 animals to create a simple equation to predict the size of a plastic item an animal can eat, based on the length of its body.

Health - 26.03.2020
Coronavirus pandemic could have caused 40 million deaths if left unchecked
Coronavirus pandemic could have caused 40 million deaths if left unchecked
The outbreak of COVID-19 would likely have caused 40 million deaths this year in the absence of any preventative measures. This is one of the findings of a new analysis by researchers at Imperial College London, which estimated the potential scale of the coronavirus pandemic across the globe, highlighting that failure to mitigate the impact could lead to huge loss of life.

Environment - Life Sciences - 26.03.2020
Marine species respond as oceans warm
A global analysis of over 300 marine species spanning more than 100 years, shows that mammals, plankton, fish, plants and seabirds have been changing in abundance as our climate warms. At the cool edge of species ranges marine life is doing well as warming opens up habitat that was previously inaccessible, while at the warmer edge species are declining as conditions become too warm to tolerate.

Health - 26.03.2020
Stresses the urgent need for serologic testing to help tackle the COVID-19 outbreak
Serologic tests are blood tests that look for antibodies in your blood, and would allow scientists to decipher what fraction of the British public have already had COVID-19 and recovered, and provide an improved estimate of the number remaining at risk of serious illness. The research led by Professor Sunetra Gupta and Dr Jose Lourenco from Oxford's Department of Zoology, used a well-understood and widely studied modelling approach.

Pharmacology - Health - 26.03.2020
’More effective’ stem cell transplant method could aid blood cancer patients
Researchers at UCL have developed a new way to make blood stem cells present in the umbilical cord 'more transplantable', a finding in mice which could improve the treatment of a wide range of blood diseases in children and adults. Blood stem cells, also known as haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), generate every type of cell in the blood (red cells, white cells and platelets), and are responsible for maintaining blood production throughout life.

Health - 26.03.2020
Opinion: how values drive decisions in science, not data
Dr Erman Sozudogru (UCL Science & Technology Studies) discusses how the choice between different methods of controlling the Covid-19 outbreak is one of differing values, rather than just pure science. The outbreak of COVID-19 resulted in a range of emergency responses and policy strategies across the globe.

Health - Social Sciences - 26.03.2020
Opinion: why we need to consult engineers as well as scientists for solutions
Dr Adam Cooper (UCL STEaPP) argues that the current response to Covid-19 coronavirus would be improved if the expertise of engineers was better utilised. The coronavirus outbreak has shone a bright light on the use of experts and scientific advice. In the UK the prime minister, Boris Johnson, is flanked by his chief scientist and chief medical officer when giving updates about his response to the outbreak - emphasising that it is driven by scientific advice.

Health - 25.03.2020
Wuhan travel restrictions prevented wider disease spread; but impact takes time
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 25 March 2020 A mobility and epidemiological study from a global consortium of researchers, led by the University of Oxford, Northeastern University and Harvard Medical School, has shown that travel restrictions from and within Wuhan and Hubei from 23 rd January worked to prevent the wider spread of COVID-19.

Environment - Life Sciences - 25.03.2020
Pablo Escobar's hippos might have helped to restore local ecological diversity
Pablo Escobar’s hippos might have helped to restore local ecological diversity
Hippos imported into Colombia by drug lord Pablo Escobar could have helped to restore ecological diversity in the surrounding area, according to a new study. An international group of researchers, including Dr Chris Sandom and Owen Middleton at the University of Sussex, conducted a worldwide analysis comparing the ecological traits of introduced herbivores, like Escobar's hippos, to those of the past.

Health - 25.03.2020
Initial success for COVID-19 social distancing in China
Initial success for COVID-19 social distancing in China
Relaxing social distancing in China shows initial success, suggests early analysis. This is the latest research from the WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling within the MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis (MRC GIDA) and the Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics ( J-IDEA ) at Imperial College London.

Life Sciences - Environment - 25.03.2020
Urban birds need to be smart or fast-breeding
Urban birds need to be smart or fast-breeding
To thrive in urban environments, birds need to either have large brains, or breed many times over their life, according to a new study involving UCL. The study, published in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution , suggests that birds have two alternative strategies for coping with the difficulties of humanity's increasingly chaotic cities.

Health - Pharmacology - 25.03.2020
New Hepatitis C cases down by almost 70 per cent in HIV positive men
New cases of hepatitis C amongst HIV positive men in London and Brighton have fallen by nearly 70 per cent in recent years. An analysis of five clinics in London and Brighton found that 378 cases were diagnosed between July 2013 - June 2018. New infections peaked at 14 per 1000 people studied in 2015, falling to 4 per 1000 by 2018.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 25.03.2020
Scientists get first look at cause of 'slow motion' earthquakes
Scientists get first look at cause of ’slow motion’ earthquakes
An international team of scientists has for the first time identified the conditions deep below the Earth's surface that lead to the triggering of so-called ‘slow motion' earthquakes. These events, more commonly known as slow slip events, are similar to regular sudden and catastrophic earthquakes but take place on much longer timescales, usually from days to months.

Social Sciences - Health - 24.03.2020
Repeat offenders’ lifestyles ’may put them at higher risk of coronavirus’
The “impulsive and risk-taking” lifestyles of repeat offenders means they are likely to be at higher risk of catching - and spreading - coronavirus, a leading criminologist suggests. Working with criminologists at Cambridge University, Professor Jonathan Shepherd, a surgeon and Cardiff University criminologist, found clear links between anti-social lifestyles and poor health.

Pharmacology - 24.03.2020
May help older adults stay physically capable for longer
Drug therapies that help older adults maintain their skeletal muscle mass and physical function for longer could be a step closer after researchers at the University of Birmingham identify a key mechanism that drives the clearance of damaged mitochondria. A team in the University's School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences are well-versed at investigating dynamic machinery within cells called mitochondria.

Business / Economics - 24.03.2020
Countries with weaker handwashing culture more exposed to COVID-19
Countries where people do not have a habit of washing their hands automatically tend to have a much higher exposure to coronavirus, a new study reveals. University of Birmingham researchers have discovered that at least 50% of people do not have a habit of automatic handwashing after using the toilet in China (77%), Japan (70%), South Korea (61%) and the Netherlands (50%).

Pharmacology - Administration - 24.03.2020
Oxford's COVID-19 research receives government funding
Oxford’s COVID-19 research receives government funding
Three Oxford-based COVID-19 projects are among the first to benefit from a share of £20 million in government investment. The three projects include work on an effective vaccine, enabling pre-clinical and clinical vaccine trials, as well as supporting researchers to develop manufacturing processes to produce a vaccine at a million-dose scale. Another project will examine how existing treatments could be repurposed to treat coronavirus.

Life Sciences - Environment - 24.03.2020
Bristol develops photosynthetic proteins for more sustainable solar-powered devices
Bristol develops photosynthetic proteins for more sustainable solar-powered devices
The initiative is part of a broader effort in the field of synthetic biology to use proteins in place of man-made materials which are often scarce, expensive and can be harmful to the environment when the device becomes obsolete. The aim of the study, published today , was the development of “chimera” photosynthetic complexes that display poly-chromatic solar energy harvesting.

Environment - Transport - 23.03.2020
Electric cars better for climate in 95% of the world
Electric cars better for climate in 95% of the world
Fears that electric cars could actually increase carbon emissions are unfounded in almost all parts of the world, new research shows. Understanding the effect of low-carbon innovations on relevant sectors of the economy, such as heating and transport, is crucial for the development of effective policy Pablo Salas Reports have questioned whether electric cars really are 'greener' once emissions from production and generating their electricity are taken into account.

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