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Results 41 - 60 of 431.


Life Sciences - Health - 09.10.2019
Badger culling drives animals further afield increasing risk of TB spread
New research reveals survivors of culls cover greater areas potentially increasing the risk of TB transmission to cattle. A study led by researchers at international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) and Imperial College London has found that culling drives badgers to roam 61% further afield - helping to explain why the practice, intended to reduce bovine TB transmission, can sometimes exacerbate the problem instead.

History / Archeology - 08.10.2019
Oldest surviving fragments of 13th century's most popular story uncovered
Oldest surviving fragments of 13th century’s most popular story uncovered
The oldest surviving pages of the 13th century's most popular story which feature one of medieval European literature's best-known sex scenes have been identified by an academic from the University of Bristol. Le Roman de la Rose or The Romance of the Rose - famously translated and adapted by Geoffrey Chaucer, author of The Canterbury Tales, a century later - is a medieval French poem styled as an allegorical dream vision.

Health - Social Sciences - 07.10.2019
UNAIDS HIV targets will be missed among gay men in Africa
UNAIDS HIV targets will be missed among gay men in Africa
Despite improvements in HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Africa, many are missing out on HIV treatment. This is the finding of research, led by Imperial College London , which analysed data from 75 independent studies involving 44,993 MSM across 28 African countries, between 2004 and 2018.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.10.2019
Secrets of lung cancer spread found in patients' blood and biopsies
Secrets of lung cancer spread found in patients’ blood and biopsies
Early signs that a patient's lung cancer may spread and become untreatable can be picked up in samples of their blood and tumour, according to a trio of papers co-led by UCL. The three studies, published , are all part of Cancer Research UK's £14million TRACERx project, which aims to understand how lung cancer cells change over time and become resistant to treatment.

Environment - 07.10.2019
China is on track to meet its ultra-low emissions goals for 2020
Polluting emissions from Chinese thermal power plants declined significantly between 2014 and 2017, according to research involving UCL. The reductions are important in helping to control China's national emissions which could lead to an improvement in air quality and considerable health benefits. A team of experts from the UK and China analysed emissions from coal, oil, natural gas and biomass power plants, with a focus on coal-fired power plants as the major contributors to ambient air pollution.

Transport - Event - 07.10.2019
Imperial academics discuss air quality with Government's Transport department
Imperial academics discuss air quality with Government’s Transport department
Imperial academics presented their research on air quality and emissions to the Government's Department for Transport. The event was organised jointly as part of the department 's learning and development series, and The Forum , Imperial's policy engagement programme. Dr Audrey de Nazelle , from Imperial's Centre for Environmental Policy, and Dr Marc Stettler , at the Centre for Transport Studies, led the event alongside the Department for Transport's Chief Scientific Adviser, Professor Phil Blythe.

Environment - 07.10.2019
Explores how to make conservation initiatives more contagious
Research shows conservation initiatives often spread like diseases, helping scientists and policymakers design programmes more likely to be taken up. The study, led by researchers at Imperial College London, modelled how conservation initiatives are adopted across regions and countries until they reach ‘scale' - at a level where they can have real impact on conserving or improving biodiversity.

Transport - Event - 07.10.2019
UK needs 'joined-up health and transport policy', academics tell Government
UK needs ’joined-up health and transport policy’, academics tell Government
Imperial academics presented their research on air quality and emissions to the Government's Department for Transport. The event was organised jointly as part of the department 's learning and development series, and The Forum , Imperial's policy engagement programme. Dr Audrey de Nazelle , from Imperial's Centre for Environmental Policy, and Dr Marc Stettler , at the Centre for Transport Studies, led the event alongside the Department for Transport's Chief Scientific Adviser, Professor Phil Blythe.

Agronomy / Food Science - 04.10.2019
People eat more when dining with friends and family
People eat more with friends and family than when dining alone - a possible throwback to our early ancestors' approach to survival, according to a new study. Previous studies found that those eating with others ate up to 48 per cent more food than solo diners and women with obesity eating socially consumed up to 29 per cent more than when eating alone.

Environment - Life Sciences - 04.10.2019
New report shows British wildlife is continuing to decline at an alarming rate
New report shows British wildlife is continuing to decline at an alarming rate
The UK's wildlife is continuing to decline, according to a new report co-authored by a University of Sussex Professor. The State of Nature 2019 report finds that, since rigorous scientific monitoring began in the 1970s, there has been a 13% decline in average abundance across wildlife studied. Butterflies and moths have been particularly hard hit with numbers of butterflies down by 17% and moths down by 25%.

Social Sciences - 04.10.2019
People eat more when dining with friends and family - study
People eat more with friends and family than when dining alone - a possible throwback to our early ancestors' approach to survival, according to a new study. This phenomenon is known as ‘social facilitation'. Previous studies found that those eating with others ate up to 48% more food than solo diners and women with obesity eating socially consumed up to 29% more than when eating alone.

Astronomy / Space Science - 04.10.2019
Observing the Cosmic Web
The Cosmic Web is believed to contain huge threads of gas that connect multiple galaxies across the universe. Now our astronomers have observed these threads extending over three million light years. This is the first time that the Cosmic Web has been imaged in such detail on large scales joining together several galaxies.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 03.10.2019
New 'fuzzy' dark matter research disrupts conventional thinking
New ’fuzzy’ dark matter research disrupts conventional thinking
New research conducted at the University of Sussex has simulated dark matter in a new way for the first time, disrupting conventional thinking about the make-up of the universe. The research, published in Physical Review Letters , was done alongside Princeton, Harvard, Cambridge and MIT universities and others.

Social Sciences - 03.10.2019
"Children’s voices" omitted from care records, UCL study finds
The social care records of looked-after children and young people need to include those children's voices, according to a collaborative research project led by UCL with the Care Leaver's Association and the charity Family Action. The MIRRA (Memory - Identity - Rights in Records - Access) project, led by Professor Elizabeth Shepherd (UCL Information Studies), collected interview and focus group data from more than 80 care leavers, social work practitioners and information professionals.

Astronomy / Space Science - 02.10.2019
The violent history of the big galaxy next door
The violent history of the big galaxy next door
Astronomers have pieced together the cannibalistic past of the neighbouring large galaxy Andromeda, which has set its sights on our Milky Way as the main course. The galactic detective work found that Andromeda has eaten several smaller galaxies during the past three billion years, with left-overs found in large streams of stars.

Health - 02.10.2019
Health worsens the longer you live in a deprived neighbourhood
Living in a deprived neighbourhood as a child can have negative effects on long-term health and the longer people stay in poor areas, the more likely they are to become ill, according to a UCL-led study. The international study, which is the first systematic review to bring together research on neighbourhood effects on health and well-being over the life course, is published today in the European Journal of Public Health.

Materials Science - 02.10.2019
New 3D printing technique for biomaterials
A new way of 3D printing soft materials such as gels and collagens offers a major step forward in the manufacture of artificial medical implants. Developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham, the technique could be used to print soft biomaterials that could be used to repair defects in the body.

Health - Pharmacology - 02.10.2019
Gut bacteria 'fingerprint' predicts radiotherapy side effects
Gut bacteria ’fingerprint’ predicts radiotherapy side effects
Scientists have conducted the first clinical study to show a link between types of gut bacteria and radiotherapy-induced gut damage. Taking a ‘fingerprint' of the mix of bacteria in the gut can indicate how susceptible individual cancer patients are to gut damage as a result of radiotherapy for prostate and gynaecological cancers, the new study shows.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 01.10.2019
'Poisoned arrowhead' used by warring bacteria could lead to new antibiotics
’Poisoned arrowhead’ used by warring bacteria could lead to new antibiotics
A weapon bacteria use to vanquish their competitors could be copied to create new forms of antibiotics, according to Imperial College London research. Researchers have uncovered a novel weapon in the arsenal of bacteria that works in a similar way to common antibiotics. By further understanding and characterizing the molecular targets of VgrG2b, and how the toxin works, this research would support the design of new antibiotics.

Health - 01.10.2019
Analysis: Having sex in older age could make you happier and healthier
Dr Sarah Jackson (UCL Epidemiology & Health) co-authors an article discussing new research which examines the importance of having sex in older age. Sexual activity is an essential part of intimate relationships, though it tends to decline as people get older. But although research shows that frequency of sexual activity can decrease with age, for many older people, sex still remains an important part of their life.

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