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Health - Life Sciences - 10.01.2017
High-sugar diet programmes a short lifespan in flies
High-sugar diet programmes a short lifespan in flies
Flies with a history of eating a high sugar diet live shorter lives, even after their diet improves. This is because the unhealthy diet drives long-term reprogramming of gene expression, according to a UCL-led team of researchers. The study, published today in Cell Reports , discovered that the action of a gene called FOXO is inhibited in flies given a high sugar diet in early life, causing long-term effects.

Social Sciences - 10.01.2017
Frankly, do we give a damn...' Study finds links between swearing and honesty
Frankly, do we give a damn...’ Study finds links between swearing and honesty
It's long been associated with anger and coarseness but profanity can have another, more positive connotation. Psychologists have learned that people who frequently curse are being more honest. Writing in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science a team of researchers from the Netherlands, the UK, the USA and Hong Kong report that people who use profanity are less likely to be associated with lying and deception.

Health - 10.01.2017
New model predicts when people are willing to try new things
New model predicts when people are willing to try new things
A new model to predict when people are most likely to try different products has been developed by scientists at UCL and dunnhumby, a customer science company. The research could help to direct public health interventions aimed at encouraging healthier choices. The team analysed anonymous purchase data from over 280,000 shoppers who regularly bought products in six categories: beers, breads, coffees, toilet papers, washing detergents and yogurts.

History / Archeology - Mathematics - 09.01.2017
What did Big Data find when it analysed 150 years of British history?
What did Big Data find when it analysed 150 years of British history?
What could be learnt about the world if you could read the news from over 100 local newspapers for a period of 150 years' This is what a team of Artificial Intelligence (AI) researchers from the University of Bristol have done, together with a social scientist and a historian, who had access to 150 years of British regional newspapers.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.01.2017
Crohn's disease risk and prognosis determined by different genes, study finds
Crohn’s disease risk and prognosis determined by different genes, study finds
Researchers have identified a series of genetic variants that affect the severity of Crohn's disease, an inflammatory bowel disease - but surprisingly, none of these variants appear to be related to an individual's risk of developing the condition in the first place.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.01.2017
Retroviruses ’almost half a billion years old’
Researchers have found that retroviruses could be half a billion years old - several hundred million years older than previously thought. Retroviruses - the family of viruses that includes HIV - are almost half a billion years old, according to new research by scientists at Oxford University. That's several hundred million years older than previously thought and suggests retroviruses have ancient marine origins, having been with their animal hosts through the evolutionary transition from sea to land.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 09.01.2017
Hunting hidden supermassive black holes
Hunting hidden supermassive black holes
Monster black holes sometimes play a cosmic game of hide and seek, shrouding themselves from view behind giant clouds of gas and dust, according to new research. Scientists believe supermassive black holes lurk at the centres of most big galaxies, but many are hidden from the view of most telescopes.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.01.2017
Mediterranean diet may protect your brain in old age, new finding suggests
Mediterranean diet may protect your brain in old age, new finding suggests
Could a Mediterranean diet keep your brain young? That is the tantalising finding from a study out this week. Writing on The Conversation website, Professor Paul Fletcher from the Department of Psychiatry investigates the findings. Amid the contention about diets and detoxes, sugar and fats, there is at least general agreement that a Mediterranean diet - fruit, vegetables, olive oil, grains, fish - is a good thing.

Social Sciences - 06.01.2017
Your health! The benefits of social drinking
New research shows that moderate alcohol consumption may be linked to improved wellbeing, thanks to the improved social interaction associated with having a drink with friends at a local pub. While most studies warn of the health risks of alcohol consumption, researchers at the University of Oxford have looked at whether having a drink may play a role in improving social cohesion, given its long association with human social activities.

Law - 06.01.2017
Brixton Road becomes first place in London to breach Nitrogen dioxide limits
Data from King's College London's Environmental Research Group has shown Brixton Road has become the first place in London to breach objectives for nitrogen dioxide for 2017. UK objectives and EU limits stipulate a maximum nitrogen dioxide concentration that must not to be exceeded for more than 18 hours over the whole year.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.01.2017
Bacteria resists 'last-resort' antibiotic
Bacteria resists ’last-resort’ antibiotic
An international research team, led by the University of Bristol, has provided the first clues to understand how the mcr-1 gene protects bacteria from colistin - a ‘last resort' antibiotic used to treat life-threatening bacterial infections that do not respond to other treatment options.

Business / Economics - Health - 05.01.2017
Job clubs could help reduce depression in people through unemployment
Job clubs could help reduce depression in people through unemployment
Job clubs could be effective in reducing depression in people experiencing the effects of unemployment, particularly those at high risk of depression, an NIHR-funded study has found. Many people feeling depressed and anxious because of financial hardship do not seek help from their GP.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.01.2017
‘Molecular volume control’ may help combat tumours
A ‘molecular volume control' may one day be used to manipulate enzyme activity in order control the development and treatment of cancer, according to research at the Universities of Dundee and Bath. The researchers have uncovered new functions of an enzyme called Dual-specificity phosphatase 5 (DUSP5), which will help scientists to better understand how tumours develop.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.01.2017
Genetics play a significant role in immunity
Nearly three quarters of immune traits are influenced by genes, new research from King's reveals. The study published today , adds to a growing body of evidence that the genetic influence on our immune system is significantly higher than previously thought. Researchers from King's, supported by the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Guy's and St Thomas' Foundation Trust and King's College London, analysed 23,000 immune traits in 497 adult female twins from the TwinsUK cohort.

Physics - Psychology - 05.01.2017
Physical activity, even in small amounts, benefits both physical and psychological well-being
Physical activity, even in small amounts, benefits both physical and psychological well-being
The largest-ever smartphone-based study examining the relationship between physical activity and happiness has found that even minimal levels of activity can have a positive effect on happiness.  In order to be happier, you don't have to go out and run a marathon. Jason Rentfrow A new study, based on reports from more than 10,000 individuals, has found that physical activity, whether or not it is classified as exercise, can have a positive effect on emotional well-being.

Electroengineering - Physics - 04.01.2017
Beam me up, Scotty – build a portable acoustic tractor beam at home for less than £70
Beam me up, Scotty – build a portable acoustic tractor beam at home for less than £70
A team of researchers from the University of Bristol have shown it's possible to create a simplified tractor beam using readily available parts with a total cost of less than £70. Tractor beams are mysterious rays that can grab and attract objects. The concept has been shown in science-fiction movies such as Star Wars or Star Trek and scientists have developed the theory using lasers.

Chemistry - Physics - 03.01.2017
‘Glue’ that makes plant cell walls strong could hold the key to wooden skyscrapers
Molecules 10,000 times narrower than the width of a human hair could hold the key to making possible wooden skyscrapers and more energy-efficient paper production, according to research published . The study, led by a father and son team at the Universities of Warwick and Cambridge, solves a long-standing mystery of how key sugars in cells bind to form strong, indigestible materials.
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