news 2016

« BACK

Electroengineering



Results 1 - 20 of 20.


Electroengineering - Computer Science - 25.11.2016
Understanding the dynamics of an avalanche
Professor Jim McElwaine of the Department of Earth Sciences talks about new research, published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface , which has given some of the first detailed measurements of what takes place inside an avalanche. Tell us a bit about the research? The aim of the project was to understand what processes are taking place inside an avalanche as it travels down a mountain.

Health - Electroengineering - 10.11.2016
HIV test performed on USB stick
HIV test performed on USB stick
Scientists have developed a type of HIV test on a USB stick. The device, created by scientists at Imperial College London and DNA Electronics , uses a drop of blood to detect HIV, and then creates an electrical signal that can be read by a computer, laptop or handheld device. The disposable test could be used for HIV patients to monitor their own treatment.

Physics - Electroengineering - 17.10.2016
Researchers road-test powerful method for studying singlet fission
Researchers road-test powerful method for studying singlet fission
In a new study, researchers measure the spin properties of electronic states produced in singlet fission - a process which could have a central role in the future development of solar cells. Future research will focus on making devices and examining how these states can be harnessed for use in solar cells Leah Weiss Physicists have successfully employed a powerful technique for studying electrons generated through singlet fission, a process which it is believed will be key to more efficient solar energy production in years to come.

Electroengineering - Health - 19.09.2016
Health benefits of evening classes revealed
An updated Cochrane Review, led by a University of Oxford researcher, provides an independent, rigorous assessment of the best available evidence to date about electronic cigarettes for quitting smoking.áThe conclusions of this updated Review are unchanged since the last review was published two years ago: electronic cigarettes may help smokers stop their smoking, and the included studies did not find any serious side effects associated with their use for up to two years.

Computer Science - Electroengineering - 22.08.2016
People favour expressive, communicative robots over efficient, effective ones
People favour expressive, communicative robots over efficient, effective ones
Making an assistive robot partner expressive and communicative is likely to make it more satisfying to work with and lead to users trusting it more, even if it makes mistakes, a new UCL-led study suggests. But the research also shows that giving robots human-like traits could have a flip side - users may even lie to the robot in order to avoid hurting its feelings.

Computer Science - Electroengineering - 19.08.2016
People favour expressive, communicative robots over efficient and effective ones
People favour expressive, communicative robots over efficient and effective ones
Making an assistive robot partner expressive and communicative is likely to make it more satisfying to work with and lead to users trusting it more, even if it makes mistakes, a new study suggests. But the research also shows that giving robots human-like traits could have a flip side - users may even lie to the robot in order to avoid hurting its feelings.

Physics - Electroengineering - 05.08.2016
Light could exist in a previously unknown form
Light could exist in a previously unknown form
New research suggests that it is possible to create a new form of light by binding light to a single electron, combining the properties of both. According to the scientists behind the study, from Imperial College London, the coupled light and electron would have properties that could lead to circuits that work with packages of light - photons - instead of electrons.

Mechanical Engineering - Electroengineering - 05.08.2016
Shape-changing metamaterial developed using Kirigami technique
Shape-changing metamaterial developed using Kirigami technique
Engineers from the University of Bristol have developed a new shape-changing metamaterial using Kirigami, which is the ancient Japanese art of cutting and folding paper to obtain 3D shapes. Metamaterials are a class of material engineered to produce properties that don't occur naturally. Currently metamaterials are used to make artificial electromagnetic and vibration absorbers and high-performance sensors.

Electroengineering - Life Sciences - 13.07.2016
Scientists closer to understanding how the ear perceives speech
Scientists closer to understanding how the ear perceives speech
The inner ear processes low-frequency sounds, important for speech and music perception, differently to high-frequency sounds, new research has found Low frequency sounds, below four kilohertz, are used by human ears for perceiving speech. However, the exact mechanism for how the inner ear processes these important sounds is poorly understood, as the organ is difficult to access in experiments.

Life Sciences - Electroengineering - 03.06.2016
Snails reveal how two brain cells can hold the key to decision making
Snails reveal how two brain cells can hold the key to decision making
Snails reveal how two brain cells can hold the key to decision making Scientists at the University of Sussex have discovered how just two neurons in the brain hold the key to explaining how complex behavioural decisions are made. In the first-of-its-kind study scientists from the University studied the brain activity of freshwater snails and discovered how a circuit comprising of just two neurons can drive a sophisticated form of decision making.

Electroengineering - Chemistry - 11.05.2016
Silver could solve issues of touch-screen technologies
Silver could solve issues of touch-screen technologies
New research shows how silver could solve issues of touch-screen technologies Physicists at the University of Sussex are developing a new material for touch-screen devices that has already proved to be more flexible and to have higher conductivity than current technologies.

Electroengineering - Chemistry - 04.05.2016
Rare materials that shrink when heated could lead to more stable electronics
Rare materials that shrink when heated could lead to more stable electronics
Researchers have discovered a material that could compensate for the damaging expansion that takes place when electronic components are heated. Most materials expand when heated, but a few rare materials do the opposite and contract. The contraction usually occurs only over a narrow temperature range and is not easy to tune, but now researchers have discovered a material that can be chemically tailored to either expand or contract in a precise way and over a wide temperature range.

Electroengineering - Health - 04.05.2016
Human heart cells respond less to e-cig vapour than tobacco smoke
Human heart cells respond less to e-cig vapour than tobacco smoke
New research has showed substantial differences in the way human heart cells respond to e-cigarette smoke and conventional cigarette smoke. Researchers from the Medical Research Council Integrative Epidemiology Unit (MRC IEU) at the University of Bristol investigated how the same type of cells as those found in the arteries of the heart, known as human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC), responded when they were exposed to both e-cigarette aerosol and conventional cigarette smoke.

Electroengineering - Event - 19.04.2016
From Brussels to Brooklyn: Bristol's 5G wireless research showcased
From Brussels to Brooklyn: Bristol’s 5G wireless research showcased
Two engineers from the University of Bristol's Communication Systems and Networks (CSN) group, who are leaders in the field of 5th generation (5G) wireless networks, have been invited to discuss the future of wireless in Brussels and Brooklyn (US) this week [19 to 22 April]. Mark Beach , Professor of Radio Systems Engineering in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering , will give an invited presentation on the Bristol Is Open Massive MIMO test bed to a European audience at the NetWorld2020 Annual Event and General Assembly 2016 in Brussels today [Tuesday 19 April].

Electroengineering - 15.04.2016
Fossil fuels could be phased out worldwide in a decade, says new study
Fossil fuels could be phased out worldwide in a decade, says new study The worldwide reliance on burning fossil fuels to create energy could be phased out in a decade, according to an article published by a major energy think tank in the UK. Professor Benjamin Sovacool, Director of the Sussex Energy Group at the University of Sussex, believes that the next great energy revolution could take place in a fraction of the time of major changes in the past.

Physics - Electroengineering - 07.03.2016
Step towards ’holy grail’ of silicon photonics
Creation of first practical silicon-based laser has the potential to transform , healthcare and energy systems A group of researchers from the UK, including academics from Cardiff University, has demonstrated the first practical laser that has been grown directly on a silicon substrate. It is believed the breakthrough could lead to ultra-fast communication between computer chips and electronic systems and therefore transform a wide variety of sectors, from and healthcare to energy generation.

Electroengineering - Physics - 12.02.2016
New insight into graphene
Physicists have discovered how electrons travel through the novel 2D material graphene. Graphene is a one atom thick supermaterial made from carbon with unique properties and the potential to revolutionise many areas from electronics to transport and energy. An international team of researchers with a crucial input from Lancaster University have discovered that electrons in graphene move like molecules in liquid water.

Physics - Electroengineering - 08.02.2016
Scientists create laser-activated superconductor
Shining lasers at superconductors can make them work at higher temperatures, suggests new findings from an international team of scientists including the University of Bath. Superconductors are materials that conduct electricity without power loss and produce strong magnetic fields. They are used in medical scanners, super-fast electronic circuits and in Maglev trains which use superconducting magnets to make the train hover above the tracks, eliminating friction.

Physics - Electroengineering - 27.01.2016
New record in nanoelectronics at ultralow temperatures
The first ever measurement of the temperature of electrons in a nanoelectronic device a few thousandths of a degree above absolute zero was demonstrated in a joint research project performed by Lancaster University, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd, and Aivon Ltd. The team managed to make the electrons in a circuit on a silicon chip colder than had previously been achieved.

Computer Science - Electroengineering - 26.01.2016
Delivering the internet of the future - at the speed of light and open sourced
Delivering the internet of the future - at the speed of light and open sourced
New research has found, for the first time, a scientific solution that enables future internet infrastructure to become completely open and programmable while carrying internet traffic at the speed of light. The research by High Performance Networks (HPN) group in the University of Bristol's Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering is published in the world's first scientific journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A .