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Electroengineering



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Chemistry - Electroengineering - 08.12.2014
Chemists create ’artificial chemical evolution’ for the first time
Scientists have taken an important step towards the possibility of creating synthetic life with the development of a form of artificial evolution in a simple chemistry set without DNA. A team from the University of Glasgow's School of Chemistry report in a new paper today (Monday 8 December) on how they have managed to create an evolving chemical system for the first time.

Electroengineering - Mechanical Engineering - 01.12.2014
New research could transform high speed optical networks
Press release issued: 1 December 2014 There is an ever growing demand for high speed internet communication systems. New research has shown optical switching technology built on nanoantenna reflectarrays and tunable materials could transform high speed optical networks. The study by Dr Maciej Klemm and Professor Martin Cryan from the University of Bristol's Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering is published in the journal, Optics Express .

Physics - Electroengineering - 15.09.2014
Simulation method identifies materials for better batteries
Researchers from the University of Cambridge have devised a new simulation technique which reliably predicts the structure and behaviour of different materials, in order to accelerate the development of next-generation batteries for a wide range of applications.

Electroengineering - Physics - 08.09.2014
Layered graphene sandwich for next generation electronics
08 Sep 2014 Sandwiching layers of graphene with white graphene could produce designer materials capable of creating high-frequency electronic devices, University of Manchester scientists have found. Writing , the researchers have demonstrated how combining the two-dimensional materials in a stack could create perfect crystals capable of being used in next generation transistors.

Life Sciences - Electroengineering - 19.08.2014
Secrets of how worms wriggle uncovered
An engineer at the University of Liverpool has found how worms move around, despite not having a brain to communicate with the body. Dr Paolo Paoletti , alongside his colleague at Harvard, Professor L Mahadevan, has developed a mathematical model for earthworms and insect larvae which challenges the traditional view of how these soft bodied animals get around.

Electroengineering - Physics - 11.08.2014
Pairing old technologies with new for next generation electronic devices
Pairing old technologies with new for next generation electronic devices
UCL scientists have discovered a new method to efficiently generate and control currents based on the magnetic nature of electrons in semi-conducting materials, offering a radical way to develop a new generation of electronic devices. One promising approach to developing new technologies is to exploit the electron's tiny magnetic moment, or 'spin'.

Electroengineering - 04.08.2014
A little video game-playing linked with better-adjusted children
Shutterstock http://www.shutterstock.com/pic-83664169/stock-photo-cologne-august-psvita-or-playstation-vita-at-gamescom-the-most-important-european-video.html'src=H0zUTI9ClkDqiDqzwCtZYw-1-42 A new study suggests video game-playing for less than an hour a day is linked with better-adjusted children and teenagers.

Computer Science - Electroengineering - 15.07.2014
Can video streaming over mobile broadband networks be improved?
Press release issued: 15 July 2014 Due to the increase in smartphone video applications, mobile video traffic is rising significantly. New research has shown how videos can be better transmitted over wireless links such as Wi-Fi and 4G. The study by Professor Andrew Nix and Dr Victoria Sgardoni from the University of Bristol's Communication Systems & Networks group is published in the journal, IEEE Transactions for Mobile Computing.

Physics - Electroengineering - 08.07.2014
'Nano-pixels' promise thin, flexible high-res displays
A new discovery will make it possible to create pixels just a few hundred nanometres across that could pave the way for extremely high-resolution and low-energy thin, flexible displays for applications such as 'smart' glasses, synthetic retinas, and foldable screens. A team led by Oxford University scientists explored the link between the electrical and optical properties of phase change materials (materials that can change from an amorphous to a crystalline state).

Physics - Electroengineering - 15.06.2014
Superconducting secrets solved after 30 years
A breakthrough has been made in identifying the origin of superconductivity in high-temperature superconductors, which has puzzled researchers for the past three decades.

Electroengineering - 10.06.2014
Innovative millimetre wave communications to be demonstrated at London exhibition
10 June 2014 Wireless data connections that exploit millimetre wave radio spectrum (30GHz to 300GHz) are expected to be used in worldwide 5G networks from 2020. The University of Bristol's Communication Systems and Networks research group has partnered with Bristol start-up Blu Wireless Technology (BWT) to develop this technology and they will demonstrate their innovative work at the Small Cells World Summit in London this week [10-12 June].

Mechanical Engineering - Electroengineering - 03.06.2014
Spiders know the meaning of web music
Spider silk transmits vibrations across a wide range of frequencies so that, when plucked like a guitar string, its sound carries information about prey, mates, and even the structural integrity of a web. The discovery was made by researchers from the Universities of Oxford, Strathclyde, and Sheffield who fired bullets and lasers at spider silk to study how it vibrates.

Electroengineering - Physics - 02.06.2014
Graphene's multi-coloured butterflies
Graphene’s multi-coloured butterflies
Combining black and white graphene can change the electronic properties of the one-atom thick material, researchers have found. Writing , an international team including Lancaster University shows that the electronic properties of graphene change dramatically if graphene is placed on top of boron nitride, also known as 'white graphite'.

Electroengineering - Physics - 02.06.2014
Graphene’s multi-coloured butterflies
02 Jun 2014 Combining black and white graphene can change the electronic properties of the one-atom thick materials, University of Manchester researchers have found. Writing , a large international team led by Dr Artem Mishchenko and Sir Andre Geim from The University of Manchester shows that the electronic properties of graphene change dramatically if graphene is placed on top of boron nitride, also known as 'white graphite'.

Mechanical Engineering - Electroengineering - 14.05.2014
Researchers create ‘ultrasonic hands’ that can grip microparticles
Press release issued: 14 May 2014 A team of researchers from the Universities of Bath, Bristol and Dundee has discovered for the first time that ultrasonic waves can be used to grab several microparticles at a time, effectively creating a pair of invisible 'ultrasonic hands' that can move tiny objects, such as cells, under a microscope.

Electroengineering - Physics - 16.04.2014
Robotics goes micro-scale
Press release issued: 16 April 2014 The development of light-driven 'micro-robots' that can autonomously investigate and manipulate the nano-scale environment in a microscope comes a step closer, thanks to new research from the University of Bristol. Such devices could be used for high-resolution imaging, allowing the investigation of delicate biological samples such as cells in new ways.

Physics - Electroengineering - 14.04.2014
New technique could transform low-energy light detection
Researchers have discovered a way to use standard semiconductors to detect light over a much broader range of wavelengths. The technology, developed by a team of scientists at Georgia State University and the University of Leeds, opens new possibilities in solar power generation and low-energy light detection.

Electroengineering - Social Sciences - 14.04.2014
Games linked to aggression if players can't master technology
Playing electronic games can make people feel aggressive, but new research finds that the reason has little to do with violent content. Researchers from the University of Oxford in the UK and the University of Rochester in the US carried out lab tests in which volunteers played both violent and non-violent games.

Electroengineering - Social Sciences - 08.04.2014
Games linked to aggression if players can't master technology
Playing electronic games can make people feel aggressive, but new research finds that the reason has little to do with violent content. Researchers from the University of Oxford in the UK and the University of Rochester in the US carried out lab tests in which volunteers played both violent and non-violent games.

Electroengineering - 21.03.2014
Ten great discoveries: A Wi-Fi virus that spreads like a cold
For National Science and Engineering Week , we are celebrating 10 great scientific advances made at the University of Liverpool. Over the 10 days of the event, we will be highlighting a different advance each day to show what science can achieve. Our eighth advance and the most recent in the series is the creation of a software virus which can spread over Wi-Fi networks.