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Results 61 - 80 of 88.


Life Sciences - Environment - 11.04.2012
Caterpillars more likely to vomit alone
A type of caterpillar which defends itself by regurgitating on its predators is less likely to do so when in groups than when alone, a new study by researchers from the University of Liverpool and the University of Bristol has found. Such reluctance is sufficient to cancel out the benefits of being in a group.

Life Sciences - Environment - 05.04.2012
Vomiting caterpillars weigh up costs and benefits of group living
Vomiting caterpillars weigh up costs and benefits of group living
A type of caterpillar which defends itself by regurgitating on its predators is less likely to do so when in groups than when alone, a new study by researchers from the University of Bristol and the University of Liverpool has found. Such reluctance is sufficient to cancel out the benefits of being in a group.

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.04.2012
Ancient Egyptian cotton unveils secrets of domesticated crop evolution
Scientists studying 1,600-year-old cotton from the banks of the Nile have found what they believe is the first evidence that punctuated evolution has occurred in a major crop group within the relatively short history of plant domestication. The findings offer an insight into the dynamics of agriculture in the ancient world and could also help today's domestic crops face challenges such as climate change and water scarcity.

Environment - Administration - 30.03.2012
Assessing protected area effectiveness
Assessing protected area effectiveness
A new study published in Conservation Letters aims to measure whether parks and reserves in the tropics succeed in protecting forests Just as deforestation rates in remote protected areas should not be compared with deforestation rates from more accessible and lower altitude unprotected areas, it is also critical to control for government-mediated access in the form of regulations governing unprotected lands.

Environment - 26.03.2012
10,000 simulations show warming of 1.4-3ºC by 2050
10,000 simulations show warming of 1.4-3ºC by 2050
A project running almost 10,000 climate simulations on volunteers' home computers has found that a global warming of 3 degrees Celsius by 2050 is 'equally plausible' as a rise of 1.4 degrees. The study, the first to run so many simulations using a complex atmosphere-ocean climate model, addresses some of the uncertainties that previous forecasts, using simpler models or only a few dozen simulations, may have over-looked.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 22.03.2012
Plants may absorb more carbon dioxide than previously thought
By Simon Levey Thursday 22 March 2012 The capacity of terrestrial ecosystems to absorb carbon dioxide emissions from human activity may be greater than previously thought, according to a new study published in Nature Climate Change , which looks at how plants react to environmental change. The authors say these results improve our ability to look into the planet's future and predict the magnitude of climate change before it happens.

Environment - 14.03.2012
Use a laser, save a tree
Use a laser, save a tree
Hand-held lasers that can remove ink from scrap paper so that it can be used again may be coming to an office near you, results from a new Cambridge study show. What we need to do now is find someone to build a prototype. Thanks to hand-held scanners and laser-jet printers, the feasibility for reusing paper in the office is there." —Dr Julian Allwood Julian Allwood, Leader of the Low Carbon Materials Processing Group at the University of Cambridge, tested Toner-print removal from paper by employing a variety of lasers.

Life Sciences - Environment - 09.03.2012
Insects offer clues on animal habitats
The long-term impact of climate change on communities of wild animals could be better understood thanks to a new study. The research will help predict how migration of animals or changes to their habitats associated with climate change could affect relationships between predators and their prey.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.03.2012
A test of the senses in the search for a shoal mate
A test of the senses in the search for a shoal mate
Young coral reef fish use sounds, smells and visual cues to find their nursery grounds, according to new research from the University of Bristol, published today in Ecology. Ever had to find your friend in a crowd? Imagine at a festival your mate saying: "I'll be wearing a yellow t-shirt by the hotdog stall behind the jazz stage." Using this information, you could walk around listening out for the romping double bass, and as you get closer and start to hear the trills of the trumpet, begin to sniff out the frying onions and sizzling sausages.

Chemistry - Environment - 08.03.2012
Scientists save energy by lubricating wood
By Simon Levey Thursday 8 March 2012 A little bit of lubrication could make a big energy saving when manufacturing sustainable biofuels and bio-chemicals from timber, according to research published in the journal Green Chemistry this month. Scientists at Imperial College London have demonstrated that a key part of biomass processing could be made 80 per cent more energy-efficient by taking advantage of the slippery properties of fluids called ionic solvents.

Environment - Life Sciences - 05.03.2012
Demise of large animals caused by both man and climate change
Demise of large animals caused by both man and climate change
Research provides new insights about what caused the extinction of many of the world's big animals over the last 100,000 years. Our research suggests that a combination of human pressure and climate change was able to cause the extinctions of many large animals in the past.

Environment - Economics - 05.03.2012
Shortcuts costly when buying conservation from farmers
Shortcuts in the design of payment schemes to persuade farmers to undertake conservation works could be putting the potential environmental benefits at risk, a study involving researchers at The University of Nottingham has found. Farmers in the EU and US receive billions of dollars/pounds in government subsidies.

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.03.2012
Flower study aids crop development
Warming autumn evenings are causing plants to flower faster than they used to, scientists have found. The discovery sheds light on the influence of seasonal temperatures on plant growth and could help the development of crops suited to changing climates. Researchers studying the growth of plants have found that increasing night temperatures in autumn accelerate their growth.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 28.02.2012
Oldest fossilised forest revealed
Oldest fossilised forest revealed
An international team, including a Cardiff University researcher, who previously found evidence of the Earth's earliest tree, has gone one step further. The research team has now unearthed and investigated an entire fossil forest dating back 385 million years. The Gilboa fossil forest, in the Catskill Mountains in upstate New York, is generally referred to as 'the oldest fossil forest'.

Life Sciences - Environment - 27.02.2012
Free-runners explore orang-utans’ ease in the trees
University of Birmingham scientists are using parkour athletes - also known as free runners - to discover how orang-utans and other tree-dwelling primates maximise energy efficiency as they move through the forest canopy. Using a simulated arboreal habitat, the free runners are mimicking the primates' movements, including commonplace practices such as 'tree swaying' and vertical climbing.

Environment - Life Sciences - 23.02.2012
Farm 'weeds' have crucial role in sustainable agriculture
Farm ’weeds’ have crucial role in sustainable agriculture
Plants often regarded as common weeds such as thistles, buttercups and clover could be critical in safe guarding fragile food webs on UK farms according to new research from the University of Bristol funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). Published in Science , the Bristol researchers detail the interactions that occur between the different food webs commonly found on farms throughout the UK and the robustness of these interactions to species loss.

Environment - 21.02.2012
Russian heat wave 'had both manmade and natural causes'
Russian heat wave 'had both manmade and natural causes'
The heat wave that struck western Russia in summer 2010, causing 55,000 deaths, was caused by a combination of manmade and natural factors. However, the frequency of occurrence of such heat waves has increased by a factor of three over recent decades, new research suggests. A study, led by Oxford University scientists, reconciles apparently contradictory results from two separate 2011 studies which attributed the extreme weather to, respectively, natural variability and human-induced climate change.

Environment - Life Sciences - 15.02.2012
The crystal ball of conservation
The crystal ball of conservation
An innovative horizon-scanning exercise, which has just delivered its latest report, highlights emerging topics of relevance to the world's natural environment and the diversity of its species. We can't hope to spot all potential issues.

Environment - 14.02.2012
Productive farms can be 'greener than organic'
Productive farms can be 'greener than organic'
Farms that aim for high food production using environmentally-friendly practices could be better for the environment than both organic and conventional farms. A study, led by Oxford University scientists, compared the environmental impact of different farming systems.

Environment - Life Sciences - 10.02.2012
A lost world? How zooarchaeology can inform biodiversity conservation
A lost world? How zooarchaeology can inform biodiversity conservation
A new study of tropical forests will provide a 50,000-year perspective on how animal biodiversity has changed, explored through an archaeological investigation of animal bones. The study of ancient animal bones can provide a remarkably long-range perspective. It can tell us about the nature of animal communities before humans intensively modified their habitats." —Dr Chris Stimpson As dawn breaks, a Cantor's Roundleaf bat flies through the lush rainforest canopy searching out its colony.