news 2011

Categories


Years
2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 2015 | 2016 | 2017 | 2018 | 2019 | 2020 | 2021 | 2022 | 2023 | 2024 |



Results 61 - 80 of 597.


Life Sciences - Health - 23.11.2011
Secrets of paracetamol unlocked
Researchers at King's College London have discovered how one of the most common household painkillers works, which could pave the way for less harmful pain relief medications to be developed in the future. Paracetamol is a widely-used analgesic (painkiller) and the main ingredient in everyday medications such as cold and flu remedies.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.11.2011
Discovery of new muscle repair gene
An international team of researchers from Leeds, London and Berlin has discovered more about the function of muscle stem cells, thanks to next-generation DNA sequencing techniques. The work, which was co-led from the University of Leeds' School of Medicine and the Charité, Berlin, is published this week.

Health - Linguistics / Literature - 18.11.2011
Mining the language of science
Scientists are developing a computer that can read vast amounts of scientific literature, make connections between facts and develop hypotheses. Ask any biomedical scientist whether they manage to keep on top of reading all of the publications in their field, let alone an adjacent field, and few will say yes.

Administration - 17.11.2011
New research claims US imposed ‘democracy’ won’t work for Arab Spring
America needs to listen to the Arab Spring protestors in Egypt and engage with their vision of the future rather than trying to impose a way of life, according to new research from the University of Warwick. In a paper just presented to state department staff at the Library of Congress in Washington DC and due to be personally presented to former US Secretary of State Madeline Albright next month, research fellow Oz Hassan claims the American idea of democracy is too focused on economics and there is a lack of innovation in US Middle East policy.

Life Sciences - 17.11.2011
Synaesthesia linked to a hyper-excitable brain
Synaesthesia linked to a hyper-excitable brain
'Hyper-excitability' in regions of the brain may underlie synaesthesia, an unusual condition where some people experience a 'blending of the senses', Oxford University researchers suggest. The neuroscientists used some of the latest brain stimulation techniques with people who 'see' colours when reading numbers or words, a common form of the condition called 'grapheme-colour synaesthesia'.

Life Sciences - 17.11.2011
Embryo development discovery
Embryo development discovery
Researchers have uncovered a novel mechanism they have termed 'developmental stalling', that might explain how errors in the development of human embryos are naturally corrected to prevent birth defects. In a study published in the journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) , researchers from King's College London's Dental Institute demonstrate how a key developmental pathway, known as the 'BMP pathway' is responsible for ensuring organs correct themselves when growing abnormally in the womb.

Life Sciences - 17.11.2011
3pm slump Why a sugar rush may not be the answer
3pm slump Why a sugar rush may not be the answer
Electrical impulses emitted by orexin cells stimulate wakefulness and tell the body to burn calories. We wondered whether dietary nutrients alter those impulses." —Dr Denis Burdakov of the Department of Pharmacology A new study has found that protein and not sugar activates the cells responsible for keeping us awake and burning calories.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.11.2011
New screening method developed
New screening method developed
Scientists have developed a rapid method that can be used to simultaneously screen patients for a range of genetic and acquired clinical conditions from a single dried blood spot. The test uses a highly sensitive and specific technique, known as mass spectrometry, to simultaneously analyse proteins, enzymes and metabolites in the blood, without the need for the large liquid blood samples currently used.

Life Sciences - 16.11.2011
DNA find sheds light on human brain
Brain cells alter their genetic make-up during a person's lifetime, scientists have found. The discovery could shed light on neurological diseases. This research completely overturns the belief that the genetic make-up of brain cells remains static throughout life and provides us with new information about how the brain works.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 16.11.2011
Schizophrenia linked to memory process
Genetic mutations that cause schizophrenia could be linked to systems in the brain responsible for learning and memory. University researchers from Edinburgh have identified changes to genes - genetic mutations - in patients with schizophrenia who had not inherited the condition. The study, which was carried out with Cardiff University, showed that these mutations occurred among a set of proteins that play a key role in memory function.

Health - 15.11.2011
IQ link to drug use
Girls with high childhood IQs are more likely to take illegal drugs in their 30s, University research has uncovered. James White from the Centre for the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions for Public Health Improvement (DECIPHer) examined data from just under 8000 people in the 1970 British Cohort Study, a large ongoing population based study, which looks at lifetime drug use, socioeconomic factors, and educational attainment.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.11.2011
Understanding schizophrenia
Understanding schizophrenia
Genetic mutations that cause schizophrenia could be linked to systems in the brain responsible for learning and memory, a major University study suggests. Leading researchers from the University's MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics & Genomics have identified changes to genes - genetic mutations - in patients with schizophrenia who had not inherited the condition.

Health - 15.11.2011
Talking therapy over the phone improves symptoms of chronic widespread pain
Talking therapy provided over the phone can have a positive impact on people suffering from chronic widespread pain compared to usual care provided by their GP, new research has shown. Patients who received a short course of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) over the telephone from trained therapists reported that they felt "better” or "very much better” at the end of a six-month treatment period, and also three months after it ended.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 14.11.2011
Transporter 5: solving an ancient mystery of the cell
Transporter 5: solving an ancient mystery of the cell
The discovery by scientists in Cambridge and Alberta of a fifth adaptor protein - a tiny and vital component of many cells -will lay the foundations for a greater understanding of genetic disorders. This fundamental research could impact on the study of diseases where certain molecules fail to get trafficked correctly." —Dr Jennifer Hirst The people who work there call it the Titanic.

Health - 11.11.2011
Price of crime for middle-aged
A life of crime starts to damage offenders' health once they reach their 40s, new research has shown. A collaboration led by the Violence and Society Research Group has analysed the lifestyles of a group of inner city males from boyhood to middle age. In their 20s and 30s, repeat offenders in the group were often fitter than their more law-abiding contemporaries.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.11.2011
New ADHD findings
New ADHD findings
A combination of rare and common genetic variations could play a part in biological pathways linked to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Cardiff University scientists revealed last year that children with the condition, like those with autism, were more likely than unaffected individuals to carry duplicated or omitted small DNA segments known as copy number variants (CNVs).

Health - Life Sciences - 10.11.2011
Multiple malaria vaccine developed
A new malaria vaccine has been created to target different forms of the disease and help those most at risk. The parasites that cause malaria come in many different forms. This new vaccine works by triggering a range of antibodies to fight the different malaria parasites. Many existing vaccines target only a limited part of the parasite population, making them less effective.

Environment - 10.11.2011
Antarctic rocks help predict sea levels
Ancient rocks embedded in the West Antarctic ice sheet could help University scientists improve sea level predictions. Researchers will determine how long Antarctic rocks at the ice surface have been exposed to cosmic radiation - energy from exploding stars in space - during their lifetime. They will use use sensor technology and chemical analysis to analyse the rocks.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.11.2011
To design drugs that could target particular nerve cells
To design drugs that could target particular nerve cells
The future of drug design lies in developing therapies that can target specific cellular processes without causing adverse reactions in other areas of the nervous system. Scientists at the Universities of Bristol and Liège in Belgium have discovered how to design drugs to target specific areas of the brain.

Life Sciences - 09.11.2011
Clues to how humans became sociable
Clues to how humans became sociable
Humans have evolved to become the most flexible of the primates and being able to live in lots of different social settings sets us apart from non-human primates, suggests research by University of Oxford and the University of Auckland. A research paper has provided important new clues to how humans network and socialise today by exploring the evolutionary history of social groupings among primates.