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Health - Social Sciences - 21.06.2023
Insights into young people’s mental health since pandemic
Scottish study reveals insights into young people's mental health since pandemic A national report, carried out every four years in collaboration with the World Health Organisation (WHO), presenting data on adolescent health and wellbeing has provided a special focus insight into young people's mental health in Scotland.

Health - Social Sciences - 21.06.2023
Researchers chart large rise in eating disorders and self-harm amongst teenage girls
Researchers chart large rise in eating disorders and self-harm amongst teenage girls
General practices have recorded a large rise in eating disorder diagnoses and self-harm episodes amongst teenage girls in the UK in the years since the COVID-19 pandemic, a research team has found. The study conducted jointly by The University of Manchester, Keele University, University of Exeter, and mental health research charity The McPin Foundation is published in the Lancet Child and Adolescent Health today (20/06/23).

Politics - Social Sciences - 04.05.2023
Are ethnic and religious minority voters key to election success?
New research led by experts from The University of Manchester , the University of St Andrews, the University of Essex and the University of Nottingham suggests that people from ethnic and religious minority groups are more likely to be interested in politics than White British people. Evidence for Equality National Survey (EVENS) is a major new survey of racism and ethnic inequalities carried out by the Centre on the Dynamics of Ethnicity (CoDE).

Social Sciences - 19.04.2023
Over a third of people from minority groups have experienced racist assaults, survey finds
More than a third of people from ethnic and religious minority groups in Britain have experienced some form of racist assault, according to new research led by experts from The University of Manchester, the University of St Andrews and King's College London. The Evidence for Equality National Survey (EVENS) is a major new survey of racism and ethnic inequalities carried out by the Centre on the Dynamics of Ethnicity (CoDE) , which reveals the extent of racism and racial discrimination experienced by people from ethnic and religious minority groups.

Politics - Social Sciences - 14.04.2023
Privately educated twice as likely to consistently vote Conservative
Those educated at private schools are twice as likely to be consistent Conservative voters in adulthood as those who had a state education, according to a new study involving UCL researchers. Published in the journal Sociology , the study uses data from a longitudinal study of almost 7,000 British people born in 1970.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 31.03.2023
Harsh discipline increases risk of children developing lasting mental health problems
Parents who frequently exercise harsh discipline with young children are putting them at significantly greater risk of developing lasting mental health problems, new evidence shows.

Health - Social Sciences - 30.03.2023
School closures may reduce COVID-19 transmission, but may also harm children’s education and wellbeing
Researchers at the University of Oxford have conducted a systematic overview of reviews to assess the impact of school closures during the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings showed that while school closures may reduce COVID-19 transmission, they were also associated with negative impacts on children's education, health, and wellbeing including increased anxiety, reduced learning, and increased obesity.

Health - Social Sciences - 29.03.2023
Social media usage linked to eating disorders in young people
Social media usage linked to eating disorders in young people
People aged between 10-24 who use social media sites may potentially be at risk of developing image concerns, eating disorders and poor mental health, suggests a new scoping review by UCL researchers. The study, published in PLOS Global Public Health , examined evidence from 50 studies in 17 countries and found that social media creates risks of social comparison and promotes the idea that it is vital to be thin or fit.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 23.03.2023
What’s your sound barrier? New study finds nearly one in five people in the UK find everyday sounds intolerable
Researchers from King's College London and University of Oxford have shown that 18.4 per cent of the general UK population report that certain sounds, such as loud chewing, and repetitive sniffing, cause a significant problem in their lives. The condition is known as misophonia. Misophonia is a strong negative reaction to common sounds, which are usually made by other people, and include breathing, yawning, or chewing.

Health - Social Sciences - 21.03.2023
Viewing self-harm images online and in social media usually causes harm
Clinical researchers from Oxford University's Department of Psychiatry and Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust have reviewed the international research evidence regarding the impact of viewing images of self-harm on the internet and in social media. This indicates that viewing such images usually causes harm, though the findings also highlighted the complexity of the issue.

Politics - Social Sciences - 07.03.2023
UK voters want politicians to face stronger checks and balances
UK voters want politicians to face stronger checks and balances
Trust in politicians is at a low ebb and the health of the UK democracy matters as much to voters as issues such as crime and immigration, according to a new report by the UCL Constitution Unit. Published today, the report found that most voters believe stronger mechanisms are needed to ensure politicians follow the rules, with four out of five saying the current system needs reform so that politicians who do not act with integrity can be punished.

Health - Social Sciences - 06.03.2023
Higher infection risk was main driver of ethnic inequality
Latin American cashier scanning products at a grocery store wearing a facemask - iStock The research, published in The Lancet: eClinicalMedicine, analysed results from 77 research studies, covering 200 million people from around the world. Earlier research showed a higher risk of severe illness or death for people from ethnic minority groups, but it was not clear if this was due to higher infection risk, poorer prognosis once infected, or both.

Social Sciences - Economics - 24.02.2023
Severity in gambling behaviours and suicidality linked in young adults
An increase in difficulties with gambling is linked to a heightened risk of suicide attempts among young adults, according to new research led by the University of Glasgow. 'Changes in severity of problem gambling and subsequent suicide attempts: a longitudinal survey of young adults in Great Britain, 2018-20' shows that over the course of a year, young adults (aged 16-24) who experienced an increase in severity of gambling harms were 2.74 times more likely to attempt suicide than those whose gambling was unchanged.

Economics - Social Sciences - 24.02.2023
Starting a business can liberate LGBT people to be themselves
Starting a business can liberate LGBT people to be themselves
Setting up a business or going self-employed can give LGBT people a sense of liberation and freedom to be their authentic selves, shows study. Setting up a business or going self-employed can give LGBT people a sense of liberation and freedom to be their authentic selves, shows a study of small businesses with LGBT owners.

Health - Social Sciences - 22.02.2023
Covid-19 pandemic created life-long risks for children in temporary accommodation in London
Covid-19 pandemic created life-long risks for children in temporary accommodation in London
Adverse effects caused by the Covid-19 pandemic could have lasting implications for children under five who are living in temporary accommodation in London, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The research, published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, examined the impact of not having a fixed address during the Covid-19 pandemic on the healthcare access and health outcomes of children under five living in the London Borough of Newham.

Economics - Social Sciences - 16.02.2023
Schools’ surge in marketing to attract pupils fuels inequalities globally
The new study published in the journal Review of Educational Research is authored by Prof Deborah Wilson, Dean of the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences. A pioneering global study has revealed how schools worldwide are using a raft of marketing techniques to attract higher performing pupils and climb the league tables.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 09.02.2023
New AI tool identifies factors that predict the reproducibility of research
New AI tool identifies factors that predict the reproducibility of research
The replication success of scientific research is linked to research methods, citation impact and social media coverage - but not university prestige or citation numbers - according to a new study involving UCL researchers. Published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ( PNAS ), the study explores the ability of a validated text-based machine learning model to predict the likelihood of successful replication for more than 14,100 psychology research articles published since 2000 across six top-tier journals.

Social Sciences - 08.02.2023
SCI weekly research round-up 8 February
SCI weekly research round-up 8 February
Don't miss out on any article, podcast or presentation by SCI members anymore with our regular research round ups covering any recently published SCI research! Dale Southerton and Alan Warde have just published an essay on sustainable consumption in a collection of papers in honour of Hal Wilhite. Hal was a social anthropologist working on issues of consumption and sustainability with a special interest in energy.

Social Sciences - 08.02.2023
Relationships matter more than emotion when it comes to 'likes' on Instagram
Relationships matter more than emotion when it comes to ’likes’ on Instagram
Friends can expect a -like- but acquaintances must play their part to earn a like on Instagram The emotional buzz of receiving a like to an Instagram post can leave people more disposed to return a like in the future, but it's the status of the relationship that is the overriding factor in determining the tap of approval, according to a study from the University of Bath.

Social Sciences - 07.02.2023
Public back bolder policies to reduce fuel and transport poverty
Study finds there is wide public support for more ambitious UK policies to tackle fuel and transport poverty. Even those who may not have issues with energy and transport bills now are concerned they may need help in the future. A 'universal basic energy' policy and cheaper bus and train fares could help those on the lowest of incomes.