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Law - 22.10.2021
The Internet of Stings: research will probe privacy and legal concerns of smart devices | University of Cambridge
The Internet of Stings: research will probe privacy and legal concerns of smart devices | University of Cambridge
What happens to all the sensitive personal information our smart devices collect from us? Where does the data picked up by our smart watches, speakers and TVs go, who has access to it and how is it used? It's often unclear what happens with the data these devices collect: where that data goes and how it is used.

Law - 10.08.2021
Introduction of stricter drink drive limit has had ’no effect’ in reducing accidents
A new study argues that lower drink drive limits need to be backed up with stricter enforcement to tackle persistent drink driving-related accidents. Last updated on Tuesday 10 August 2021 The introduction of a tougher drink drive limit in Scotland over six years ago has had 'no effect' at reducing drink driving or alcohol related collisions say the authors of a new academic study.

Social Sciences - Law - 24.02.2021
Increased green space in prisons can reduce self-harm and violence
Prisons with more green space have lower levels of violence and self-harm, according to new research at the University of Birmingham and Utrecht University. The study is the first to attempt large-scale mapping of green space within prison environments and link it to well-being in a robust, statistically significant way.

Law - 12.10.2020
’Universal law of touch’ will enable new advances in Virtual Reality
Seismic waves, commonly associated with earthquakes, have been used by scientists to develop a universal scaling law for the sense of touch. A team, led by researchers at the University of Birmingham, used Rayleigh waves to create the first scaling law for touch sensitivity. The results are published in Science Advances .

Health - Law - 07.04.2020
Covid-19: Scientists develop Bluetooth tracing system, with privacy at heart
A new Bluetooth contact tracing system for detecting Covid-19 proximity, has been developed by a team of scientists and data privacy experts, including from UCL. The DP-3T tracing system, which is presented openly for public scrutiny in a new White Paper , works at scale and has been developed to the highest privacy standards, ready to deploy into an app.

Law - Philosophy - 05.11.2019
Lawyers asked to advise on unethical issues
Nearly half (45%) of in-house lawyers have been asked to advise on an action with debatable ethics, according to research by UCL. The research, published in a new report ' Which way is the wind blowing? Understanding the moral compass of in-house legal counsel' also found that 39% of in-house lawyers had been asked to advise on something which was potentially illegal.

Social Sciences - Law - 10.10.2019
Update ‘nearest relative’ criteria under Mental Health Act to increase patient choice
The system in place under the Mental Health Act that places decision-making powers in the hands of the nearest relatives for people who are sectioned needs to be extended to others to improve patient choice, according to new research. The study, from academics at the universities of Bath, Bristol and the University of the West of England published in the journal Health & Social Care in the Community , identifies challenges to the existing system and makes recommendations for policy-makers and practitioners.

Law - 10.10.2019
Scottish Jury Research report published
Findings from the UK's largest mock jury research project to-date have been released. Commissioned by the Scottish Government, the research was led by Ipsos MORI Scotland, with the collaboration of School of Law academics Professor Fiona Leverick and Professor James Chalmers and the University of Warwick's Professor Vanessa Munro.

Law - 01.10.2019
Why our extreme porn laws need to change
A law against possession of rape pornography, introduced in 2015, is very rarely used with few charges and prosecutions. This is what our researchers have found after analysing data obtained through a Freedom of Information request. Police focus The research shows that during 2015-2017 the vast majority (85 per cent) of extreme pornography charges were for possessing bestiality porn with only one per cent of charges for rape pornography.

Law - Innovation - 19.09.2019
Opinion: Why forensic science is in crisis and how we can fix it
Professor Ruth Morgan (UCL Security and Crime Science) writes about the misinterpretation of forensic evidence and the issues that this causes for the criminal justice system. Imagine you're in court, accused of a crime that you know you didn't commit. Now imagine a scientist takes the stand and starts explaining to the court how your DNA is on the murder weapon.

Law - 26.07.2019
Muslim LGBTQI+ refugees more likely to gain asylum in Germany if they conform to stereotypes
LGBTQI+ Muslims seeking asylum are more successful if they speak, dress and act in accordance with Western notions of homosexuality, according to a new study from the University of Bristol.

Law - 29.04.2019
Could a lack of confidence in design law reduce innovation in the UK?
UK designers are less likely to seek legal action if someone copies their work compared with the rest of Europe, according to new research. Experts at the University of Nottingham tested the effectiveness of design case law in the 28 member states of the EU. Among the big countries in the EU, the UK had some of the lowest numbers of cases brought to court per population, often with less favourable outcomes for designers.

Economics / Business - Law - 12.04.2019
Knife crime: assault data can help forecast fatal stabbings
Police at a crime scene in Leyton, east London after a man in his twenties was stabbed to death in March of this year. Credit: PA. Police at a crime scene in Leyton, east London after a man in his twenties was stabbed to death in March of this year. Credit: PA. Knife crime data from a 12-month period could be used to help forecast the London neighbourhoods most likely to suffer a fatal stabbing the following year, according to latest research.

Law - 12.12.2018
Reduction in the legal blood alcohol limit has had no impact on number of road traffic accidents
The lowering of the legal blood alcohol limit for drivers in Scotland has had no impact on the number of road traffic accidents, a new study has found. The research, led by the University of Glasgow and published in The Lancet, evaluated the impact of the change in legislation which occurred in Scotland in December 2014, when the blood alcohol concentration limit for drivers was reduced from 80 mg/dL to 50 mg/dL.

Law - 01.10.2018
Couples in South Asia struggle to gain economic independence from in-laws
Intergenerational power relations may be just as important as male-female power relations for women's economic empowerment, according to new UCL research. The study, published in  World Development , was conducted in rural Nepal where mothers-in-law and daughters-in-law often have fraught relationships, as their survival and well-being depend on gaining favour with male family members.

Law - 21.09.2018
University of Birmingham signs joint initiative to develop HydroFlex - the UK’s first hydrogen train
A change in culture within the NHS is needed to ensure that managers are less resistant to hearing, and acting upon, bad news, research led by the University of Birmingham has found. Research led by the University's Health Services Management Centre found that any future whistleblowing policies must deal with the 'deaf effect' amongst NHS managers, where entrenched status and power differences between different professional and occupational groups can limit open reporting cultures.

Law - Politics - 23.08.2018
More work needed to make Irish abortion law fit-for-purpose
While Government-imposed restrictions on immigration can reduce overall migration, they can also be ineffective or even counterproductive, pushing more would-be migrants into unauthorised channels, finds new research carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham. The study, published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, investigated how individuals are likely to move from one country to another based on varying levels of restriction.

Politics - Law - 07.08.2018
Visa restrictions can lead to increase in illegal migration
While Government-imposed restrictions on immigration can reduce overall migration, they can also be ineffective or even counterproductive, pushing more would-be migrants into unauthorised channels, finds new UCL-led research in collaboration with Royal Holloway and University of Birmingham. The study, published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , investigated how individuals are likely to move from one country to another based on varying levels of restriction.

Law - Social Sciences - 19.06.2018
Changing the law to protect victims of upskirting
Professor Clare McGlynn of Durham Law School tells how her research has helped to shape a law on upskirting and why more comprehensive legislation is needed to protect victims from all image-based sexual abuse. Moves to legislate against upskirting - the act of secretly taking a photograph under a victim's skirt - hit the headlines when a planned law to criminalise the act stalled in Parliament.

Economics / Business - Law - 04.06.2018
Eye-tracking software makes insurance policies easier to understand
Researchers at the University of Nottingham and insurance law firm Browne Jacobson LLP are using eye-tracking software to help insurers write policies that are much easier to read and understand. If you've ever found an insurance document difficult to read, then you are not alone. A new study has found that one of the reasons for this is the number of 'uncommon words' which are used in most policies.
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