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Results 81 - 100 of 104.


Physics - Environment - 20.03.2017
'Fingerprint' technique spots frog populations at risk from pollution
‘Fingerprint’ technique spots frog populations at risk from pollution
Researchers at Lancaster University have found a way to detect subtle early warning signs that reveal a frog population is at risk from pollution. Worldwide, amphibian populations are declining due to habitat loss, disease and pollution which is cited as a major threat to their survival. Scientists publishing in Scientific Reports , have found evidence of stress in tadpoles taken from ponds most impacted by pollution caused by nutrients and pesticides.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.03.2017
Deep-sea corals reveal why atmospheric carbon was reduced during colder time periods
Deep-sea corals reveal why atmospheric carbon was reduced during colder time periods
We know a lot about how carbon dioxide (CO2) levels can drive climate change, but how about the way that climate change can cause fluctuations in CO2 levels? New research from an international team of scientists, which includes the University of Bristol, reveals one of the mechanisms by which a colder climate was accompanied by depleted atmospheric CO2 during past ice ages.

Physics - Environment - 17.03.2017
Why water splashes: new theory reveals secrets
Reason why raindrops and spilt coffee splash revealed by University of Warwick research New theory uncovers - for first time - what happens in space between liquid drop and surface to cause splash Microscopic layer of air - 50 times smaller than a human hair - trapped between liquid and surface can prevent liquid spreading on surface Scale comparable to a 1cm layer of air stopping a tsunami wave spreading across a beach Research published in top Physics & Mathematics journal New research from the University of Warwick generates fresh insight into how a raindrop or spilt coffee splashes.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.03.2017
Natural measures to prevent floods are not a ’silver bullet’ solution
Oxford Martin School research says claims that natural flood management can improve the worst floods are not supported by scientific evidence. Their research in the Proceedings of the Royal Society A concludes that natural measures to manage flooding from rivers can play a valuable role in flood prevention.

Environment - Life Sciences - 16.03.2017
Survival of bumblebee families improved by flowers
Survival of bumblebee families improved by flowers
Flower-rich habitats are key to enhancing the survival of bumblebee families, according to new research involving UCL scientists. The team led by the UK's Centre for Ecology & Hydrology found that increasing flowers provided by spring-flowering trees, hedgerow plants and crops across the landscape - in combination with summer flower resources - can increase the probability of family survival to the next year by up to four times.

Environment - 14.03.2017
Research partnerships with first-ever Brazil Week
Researchers at the University of Birmingham have developed a way of investigating or diagnosing the challenges facing their home city that could be used to help improve the lives of city dwellers around the world. And the blueprint they are working with could help city policy makers and other countries to take more effective actions to boost the quality of life for residents by providing better outcomes.

Chemistry - Environment - 14.03.2017
Doubts about whether internet filters protect teenagers online
Ancient fossilised algae may be the gateway to understanding the atmospheric carbon dioxide levels of the Earth during the dinosaur era, and the role this played in changing the prehistoric climate. Copyright: Shutterstock Ancient fossilised algae may be the gateway to understanding carbon dioxide and the role it played in transforming the prehistoric climate, a new  Oxford University  study has found.

Environment - 09.03.2017
University brings £3.5 billion boost to the UK economy
New research suggests that the capacity of the terrestrial biosphere to absorb carbon dioxide (CO2) may have been underestimated in past calculations due to certain land-use changes not being fully taken into account. It is widely known that the terrestrial biosphere (the collective term for all the world's land vegetation, soil, etc.) is an important factor in mitigating climate change, as it absorbs around 20% of all fossil fuel CO2 emissions.

Environment - 09.03.2017
University of Birmingham welcomes the publication of the Midlands Engine strategy
Experts at the University of Birmingham are joining forces with partners in India and the UK on a project to help tackle health problems associated with air pollution in Delhi. With air pollution levels at times up to 30 times greater than those found in the UK, Delhi - pictured below in November - was rated as the most polluted city in the world for ambient air pollution by the World Health Organisation (WHO) in 2014.

Media - Environment - 08.03.2017
Writing group ‘boosts productivity and reduces stress’ at Oxford
Researchers say 'benevolent bots', otherwise known as software robots, that are designed to make articles on Wikipedia better often end up having online fights lasting years over changes in content. Editing bots on Wikipedia undo vandalism, enforce bans, check spelling, create links and import content automatically, whereas other bots (which are non-editing) can mine data, identify data or identify copyright infringements.

Environment - 08.03.2017
Genetic sequencing offers same-day TB testing
Researchers from the University's Department of Engineering Science and the School of Geography and the Environment believe they have discovered a new way of accurately estimating groundwater resources in Africa, using low-cost mobile technologies fitted to existing hand pumps. Around one million hand pumps supply groundwater to people in rural Africa.

Environment - Life Sciences - 02.03.2017
Fossil plankton may be the key to understanding prehistoric climate change
Over 4,000 different bird species, including White Fronted Bee Eaters, were observed in the study, which found that survival instinct did not influence species cooperative breeding decisions. Instead, it shows communal living and helping behaviour to be a natural result of monogamous relationships reinforcing stronger genetic bonds in family groups.

Environment - 01.03.2017
Heathrow: strategy to reduce take-off emissions is reaching its limits
Heathrow: strategy to reduce take-off emissions is reaching its limits
Engineers report that a strategy to reduce aircraft emissions during takeoff at London's Heathrow Airport is reaching its limits. This is the first time we've been able to look at detailed flight operations on a second-by-second basis and our study has shown that pilots routinely use an engine thrust for take-off that leads to lower fuel consumption and emissions, without compromising safety standards.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 28.02.2017
First direct measurements of Pacific seabed sediments reveal strong methane source
First direct measurements of Pacific seabed sediments reveal strong methane source
Researchers from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have discovered a major source of an important greenhouse gas in the Tropical Pacific Ocean for the first time. Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, and a major contributor to increasing global temperatures. The largest pool of marine methane on Earth spans from the coast of Central America to Hawaii in the Tropical Pacific Ocean.

Environment - 28.02.2017
Calculating recharge of groundwater more precisely
Calculating recharge of groundwater more precisely
An international team of researchers has demonstrated that key processes in models used for the global assessment of water resources for climate change are currently missing. This could mean climate change impact models are wrong in some parts of the world and cannot yet be used to guide water management.

Media - Environment - 24.02.2017
’Computer bots are like humans, having fights lasting years’
Researchers say 'benevolent bots', otherwise known as software robots, that are designed to make articles on Wikipedia better often end up having online fights lasting years over changes in content. Editing bots on Wikipedia undo vandalism, enforce bans, check spelling, create links and import content automatically, whereas other bots (which are non-editing) can mine data, identify data or identify copyright infringements.

Life Sciences - Environment - 22.02.2017
Blood ties fuel cooperation among species, not survival instinct
Over 4,000 different bird species, including White Fronted Bee Eaters, were observed in the study, which found that survival instinct did not influence species cooperative breeding decisions. Instead, it shows communal living and helping behaviour to be a natural result of monogamous relationships reinforcing stronger genetic bonds in family groups.

Environment - Chemistry - 17.02.2017
The University of Nottingham launches new tool to evaluate peatland sensitivity to global climate change
Scientists at The University of Nottingham are using radar waves as part of a new tool developed to evaluate peatland sensitivity to global climate change. The new method is based upon an Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique that uses radar waves to measure vertical land surface motion.

Environment - 14.02.2017
‘Great British Energy’ could fuel conservatives’ passion for climate change action
Using language around 'Great British Energy' could become a valuable tool for climate change communicators to inspire and engage people right across the political spectrum. A new study by Cardiff University and Climate Outreach also revealed that language around British low-carbon energy technologies and the idea of avoiding waste resonates strongly with people of right-of-centre political views.

Environment - 24.01.2017
Cooperation helps mammals survive in tough environments
Cooperation helps mammals survive in tough environments
New research suggests that cooperative breeding makes mammal species such as meerkats better suited to dry, harsh climates. Cooperative breeders may also persist in areas where changes in climate make life increasingly difficult Tim Clutton-Brock Cooperatively breeding mammal species, such as meerkats and naked-mole rats, where non-breeding helpers assist breeding females in raising their offspring, are better able to cope with living in dry areas than related non-cooperative species, new research reveals.