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Results 61 - 80 of 104.


Environment - 30.05.2017
Amazon rainforest may be more resilient to deforestation than previously thought
Amazon rainforest may be more resilient to deforestation than previously thought
Taking a fresh look at evidence from satellite data, and using the latest theories from complexity science, researchers at the University of Bristol have provided new evidence to show that the Amazon rainforest is not as fragile as previously thought. The research is published today. The Amazon forest stores about half of the global tropical forest carbon and accounts for about a quarter of carbon absorption from the atmosphere by global forests each year.

Environment - Civil Engineering - 29.05.2017
'Heat island' effect could double climate change costs for world's cities
‘Heat island’ effect could double climate change costs for world’s cities
'Heat island' effect could double climate change costs for world's cities Overheated cities face climate change costs at least twice as big as the rest of the world because of the 'urban heat island' effect, new research shows. The study by an international team of economists of all the world's major cities is the first to quantify the potentially devastating combined impact of global and local climate change on urban economies.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 25.05.2017
New approach predicts threats to rainforests
Borneo is an island that has lost a staggering 30 percent of its forest since the 1970s and is among the most biodiverse and threatened on the planet. The study findings, published in Landscape Ecology, will be useful to all forest conservationists, and could help tropical forests around the world, including Borneo.

Life Sciences - Environment - 25.05.2017
New insights into the ancestors of all complex life
New insights into the ancestors of all complex life
A team of scientists led by the University of Bristol has provided new insights into the origins of the Archaea, the group of simple cellular organisms that are the ancestors of all complex life. The Archaea are one of the Earth's most genetically and ecologically diverse groups of micro-organisms. They thrive in a bewildering variety of habitats, from the familiar - soils and oceans - to the inhospitable and bizarre, such as the boiling acid pools of Yellowstone National Park.

Environment - Music - 18.05.2017
University of Birmingham backs Chinese orchestra’s first concert in Britain
A major new decade-long experiment to study the impact of climate and environmental change on woodlands is launching today. The Free Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) experiment at the Birmingham Institute of Forest Research (BIFoR) will assess the impact of raised carbon dioxide (CO2) levels on whole forest ecosystems by artificially raising the CO2 level around patches of mature woodland.

Life Sciences - Environment - 18.05.2017
Global pattern in predation
Plasticine 'dummy caterpillars' were used in the study and deployed across the world at sites including Tai Po Kau, Hong Kong. Image credit: Chung Yun Tak A new Oxford University collaboration revealing the world's prime insect predation hotspots, achieved its landmark findings using an unusual aid: plasticine 'dummy caterpillars.' The new study published in Science has revealed a global pattern of predation on insect herbivores.

Environment - Life Sciences - 27.04.2017
Fukomys livingstoni, I presume?
Fukomys livingstoni, I presume?
Two new species of African mole-rat have been discovered by researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), together with colleagues in Tanzania and at the University of Pretoria. The species, formally described as Fukomys hanangensis and Fukomys livingstoni, were found around Mount Hanang and at Ujiji on the shores of Lake Tanganyika, both in Tanzania.

Environment - Administration - 21.04.2017
Overhunting results in wide-spread declines in tropical mammal & bird populations
Overhunting results in wide-spread declines in tropical mammal & bird populations
Overhunting results in wide-spread declines in tropical mammal & bird populations Tropical mammal and bird populations dramatically decline in overhunted areas - new research reveals. The major study published in the renowned journal Science, reveals hunting accounts for a 83 percent decline in mammal populations and a 58 percent decline in bird populations in the tropical regions of Central and South America, Africa and Asia.

Health - Environment - 20.04.2017
Deadly amphibian plague can infect young zebrafish, scientists discover
Deadly amphibian plague can infect young zebrafish, scientists discover
The deadly chytrid fungus has for the first time been found to infect and kill species other than amphibians, giving clues on how it causes disease. The fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis ( Bd ), is a type of chytrid that has severely affected over 700 amphibian species worldwide, and has made more species extinct than any other infectious disease known to science - at least 200 so far.

Life Sciences - Environment - 12.04.2017
Elephants? ‘body awareness’ adds to increasing evidence of their intelligence
Asian elephants are able to recognise their bodies as obstacles to success in problem-solving, further strengthening evidence of their intelligence and self-awareness, according to a new study from the University of Cambridge.

Environment - 10.04.2017
Home monitoring kits for Merthyr
The installation of a simple monitoring kit could help us to better manage temperature, humidity and electricity usage in our homes and ultimately lead more comfortable lives. This is one of the main findings from a Cardiff University project that set out to provide residents of Merthyr Tydfil with a greater understanding of how their homes work and provide advice on simple measures that could be implemented to make their home more comfortable and energy efficient.

Economics / Business - Environment - 06.04.2017
’Better data needed’ on measures of sustainability in business
Oxford research shows increasing numbers of investors want better reporting on the environmental, social and governmental (ESG) factors that affect performance so they can make more informed decisions on where to put their money. These factors are the main way of measuring the sustainability and ethical effect of an investment in a company or business.

Environment - Life Sciences - 05.04.2017
Scientists collaborate on aquatic ecology experiments across Europe
Scientists collaborate on aquatic ecology experiments across Europe
Imperial are founding partners in a new Europe-wide network of aquatic ecosystem experiments stretching from the Arctic to the Mediterranean. The network will perform the first systematic large-scale experiments to compare how both freshwater and marine ecosystems respond to environmental pressures, including climatic change and other effects of the growing human population.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 04.04.2017
Evidence of Britain’s separation from Europe
Researchers have found evidence of how ancient Britain separated from Europe, which happened in two stages, they report. Nearly 450,000 years ago, when Earth was in the grip of an ice age, ice stretched right across the North Sea, from Britain to Scandinavia. The low sea levels meant that the entire English Channel was dry land, a frozen tundra landscape, crisscrossed by small rivers.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 03.04.2017
Microbial colonisers of Arctic soils are sensitive to future climate change
Microbial colonisers of Arctic soils are sensitive to future climate change
A team of researchers from the University of Bristol have recently shown that ecosystems created by melting glaciers in the Arctic are sensitive to climate change and human activity. Melting ice is exposing vast landscapes that are colonised by simple forms of microbial life. These microbes in Arctic soils must cope with short cool summers and long freezing winters, as well as starvation from nutrients.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 03.04.2017
University of Birmingham recognised for excellence in cyber security research
Iron particles generated by cities and industry are being dissolved by man-made air pollution and washed into the sea - potentially increasing the amount of greenhouse gases that the world's oceans can absorb, a new study suggests. Scientists have long believed that acids formed from human-generated pollution and natural emissions dissolve iron in airborne particles - increasing the amount of iron to the ocean - but have lacked direct evidence to prove this theory.

Economics / Business - Environment - 30.03.2017
Curbing coffee cup usage
The use of disposable coffee cups could be reduced by 50 - 300 million annually according to research announced today by leading coffee roaster Bewley's. An estimated 2.5bn disposable coffee cups are used in the UK each year, creating approximately 25,000 tonnes of waste. The research, conducted from September to December 2016 by Cardiff University on behalf of Bewley's tested a range of measures that could encourage the use of re-usable coffee cups.

Life Sciences - Environment - 29.03.2017
Seasonal warming leads to smaller animal body sizes
Seasonal warming leads to smaller animal body sizes
Changes in the body size of animals measured under controlled laboratory conditions have been shown to closely match changes in body size with seasonal warming in nature, according to research from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). Cold-blooded species rely on the temperature of their external environment to dictate their internal body temperature.

Environment - Health - 23.03.2017
Seabed conditions key to survival of juvenile cod, haddock and whiting
Links between seabed type and quality are closely related to the abundance and size of young commercially fished species such as cod, haddock and whiting. A new study, led by the University of Glasgow and published today in Marine Ecology Progress Series, examines the abundance and size of these three types of commercial fish over the course of two years in the South Arran Nature Conservation Marine Protected Area in the Firth of Clyde.

Health - Environment - 21.03.2017
Ghosts of past diseases shape species evolution
Ghosts of past diseases shape species evolution
A team of researchers from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (EAWAG) has revealed that diseases can not only affect fish evolution, but also the aquatic environments in which fish live. Parasites and diseases are major elements of the environment that affect animal populations.