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Results 21 - 40 of 104.


Environment - Life Sciences - 30.10.2017
The advent of "green” cattle
Implications of livestock farming on climate change should not be drawn from aggregate statistics, reveals a study based on a new method of carbon footprinting for pasture-based cattle production systems that can assess the impacts of individual animals. The new method, developed by a team from the University of Bristol and Rothamsted Research, records the environmental impact of each animal separately before calculating the overall burden of a farm.

Environment - Economics / Business - 25.10.2017
Global biodiversity conservation does save species, but could be done smarter
New analysis reveals that billions of dollars spent on habitat and species conservation have resulted in substantial reductions in biodiversity loss. Government spending on conservation efforts, such as management of national parks, has been patchy across the world, in part due to a lack of solid evidence of success.

Environment - Administration - 25.10.2017
How 14 Billion Dollars Protected Earth’s Species
Billions of dollars of financial investment in global conservation has significantly reduced biodiversity loss, according to a new Oxford University research. Image credit: Shutterstock Billions of dollars of financial investment in global conservation has significantly reduced biodiversity loss, according to a new Oxford University research.

Environment - Life Sciences - 23.10.2017
Bees feast on fast food
A study of honey bee bread in Lancashire and Cumbria bee hives showed that in some samples nearly 90 per cent of the pollen came from Himalayan balsam Honey bees love the invasive plant Himalayan balsam and eat it like 'fast food' but, like humans, they thrive better on a varied diet. A study of honey bee bread in Lancashire and Cumbria bee hives showed that in some samples nearly 90 per cent of the pollen came from the invasive plant Himalayan balsam.

Environment - 23.10.2017
Sugarcane could help cut global carbon problem
Abandoned sugarcane plantations across the tropics could offer us a realistic, sustainable alternative to fossil fuels - according to new research published this week. Ethanol produced from sugarcane has been one of the most successful short-term strategies to date in decarbonizing energy supply, particularly in Brazil where the sugarcane ethanol system results in just 14% of the CO2 emissions of petroleum.

Environment - Life Sciences - 23.10.2017
Reduced impact logging still harms biodiversity in tropical rainforests
A new study finds that even low levels of logging in the Amazon rainforest may lead to great losses in biodiversity. More than 403 million hectares of tropical forests worldwide have been earmarked for timber concessions with selective logging a common economic activity. The Brazilian Amazon alone holds around 4.5 billion m3 of commercial timber volume, and the demand on Amazonian hardwood is increased as African and Asian timber stocks are exhausted.

Life Sciences - Environment - 20.10.2017
British birds adapt their beaks to birdfeeders
Certain British birds have evolved longer beaks than other species, and new research suggests that our fondness for feeding them may be the reason why. Image credit: Dennis Van De Water Certain British birds have evolved longer beaks than other species, and new research suggests that our fondness for feeding them may be the reason why.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 17.10.2017
Hardy corals take to the seas to build new reefs from scratch
Tough species of corals can go mobile and lay the foundations for new reefs in otherwise inhospitable areas, a study shows. Scientists have discovered that the rolling and resilient corals can act as a base upon which other corals attach and build reefs by creating their own stable habitats. The finding sheds new light on the mobile corals - called coralliths - which grow on pebbles or fragments of dead reefs, and can survive being buffeted by waves and ocean currents.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 12.10.2017
Rainfall trends in arid regions buck commonly held climate change theories
The recent intense hurricanes in the Atlantic have sharply focused attention on how climate change can exacerbate extreme weather events. Scientific research suggests that global warming causes heavier rainfall because a hotter atmosphere can hold more moisture and warmer oceans evaporate faster feeding the atmosphere with more moisture.

Environment - 12.10.2017
Ground-floor insulation can reduce floor heat loss by up to 92 per cent
Adding insulation to suspended timber ground floors commonly found in homes built before the Second World War can reduce heat-loss by up to 92 per cent, according to research from UCL and the University of Sheffield. A simple job for the DIY enthusiast, the research team claim that this intervention has the potential to dramatically reduce heating bills and contribute to the UK's CO2 emissions reduction targets.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 11.10.2017
Dual project supports understanding of climate change and astronomy
The THz sounder TARDiS (Terahertz Atmospheric/ Astrophysics Radiation Detection in Space) will sit on the International Space Station (ISS) and support scientists to better understand the effects of climate change on space, and the origin of the stars and planets. Image credit: Shutterstock Scientists from the University of Oxford are to play a key role in new missions that will help to both better monitor the effects of climate change on space and understand the origin of the stars and planets.

Environment - Life Sciences - 10.10.2017
Forest grazing counteracts the effectiveness of trees to reduce flood risk
Planting trees can reduce flood risk, but a high intensity forest land use, such as grazing, can counteract the positive effect of the trees, a recently published study suggests. As the frequency and severity of flooding becomes an increasing problem, land managers are turning to natural flood management measures, such as tree planting, to reduce the risk.

Environment - 10.10.2017
Conservationists’ eco-footprints suggest education alone won’t change behaviour
A new study shows that even those presumably best informed on the environment find it hard to consistently "walk the walk", prompting scientists to question whether relying solely on information campaigns will ever be enough. While it may be hard to accept, we have to start acknowledging that increased education alone is perhaps not the panacea we would hope Andrew Balmford Conservationists work to save the planet, and few are as knowledgeable when it comes to the environmental pressures of the Anthropocene.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 10.10.2017
Little growth observed in India’s methane emissions
Methane is the second most powerful greenhouse gas and concentrations are rising in the atmosphere. Because of its potency and quick decay in the atmosphere, countries have recognised that reduction of methane emissions are a means toward mitigating global warming. In light of the new international climate agreement, the Paris Agreement, there is increasing need for countries to accurately quantify their greenhouse gas emissions and to have independent checks on this reporting.

Environment - 03.10.2017
New report reviews role of trees in flood alleviation
Severe floods that hit Cumbria in December 2015 led to an increase in calls for natural solutions to be included in flood alleviation schemes. Acknowledging ongoing debates around the evidence for tree cover as an effective flood mitigation measure, the UK's Centre for Ecology & Hydrology has published results of a systematic review of the current evidence.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 02.10.2017
Birmingham raises ceiling on diversity and inclusion with Marks & Spencer
Researchers have warned of an 'urgent worldwide need' to address a broad spectrum of cascading impacts of glacier mass loss on downstream systems. In their paper, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the authors synthesised currently available evidence and documented the profound impact on freshwater and near-shore marine systems.

Life Sciences - Environment - 01.10.2017
Meet the hominin species that gave us genital herpes
New research uses innovative data modelling to predict which species acted as an intermediary between our ancestors and those of chimpanzees to carry HSV2 - the genital herpes virus - across the species barrier. Herpes infect everything from humans to coral, with each species having its own specific set of viruses Charlotte Houldcroft Two herpes simplex viruses infect primates from unknown evolutionary depths.

Environment - Art and Design - 29.09.2017
Conservationists should harness ‘Hollywood effect’ to help wildlife
How did Finding Nemo affect clownfish? Was Jaws bad for sharks' Did the remake of the Jungle Book help pangolins? Researchers from Lancaster University and the University of Exeter say conservation scientists could work with filmmakers to harness the "Hollywood effect" to boost conservation. Scientific advisors and product placement are already commonplace in films, and the researchers say similar methods could be used to raise awareness of endangered species and other environmental issues.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 07.09.2017
New research disputes claims that climate change helped spark the Syrian civil war
New research disputes claims that climate change helped spark the Syrian civil war A new study, published today in the journal Political Geography , shows that there is no sound evidence that global climate change was a factor in causing the Syrian civil war. Claims that a major drought caused by anthropogenic climate change was a key factor in starting the Syrian civil war have gained considerable traction since 2015 and have become an accepted narrative in the press, most recently repeated by former US vice president Al Gore in relation to Brexit.

Environment - Life Sciences - 30.08.2017
A big difference between Asian and African elephants is diet
New research has shown that there are significant differences between the Asian and the African forest elephant - and it isn't just about size and the shape of their ears. It is about what they eat and how they affect forest ecosystems. See video here. As megaherbivores and the largest of our land animals, elephants have a significant impact on their habitat.