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Paleontology - 08.05.2024
Weegie scampi: Discovery of ancient Glaswegian shrimp fossil unveils new species
Weegie scampi: Discovery of ancient Glaswegian shrimp fossil unveils new species
A short but robust little shrimp may have died out over 330 million years ago during the Carboniferous period, but the rare Scottish shellfish has been revitalised as a new species to science and as a Glaswegian.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 17.04.2024
Manchester paleontologist unearths what may be the largest known marine reptile
Part of the research team in 2020 examining the initial finds (at the back) of the new discovery made by Ruby and Justin Reynolds. Additional sections of the bone were subsequently discovered. From left to right, Dr Dean Lomax, Ruby Reynolds, Justin Reynolds and Paul de la Salle. Credit: Dr Dean Lomax A palaeontologist at The University of Manchester has identified the fossilised remains of a second gigantic jawbone measuring more than two metres long.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 05.03.2024
Fossils of giant sea lizard show how our oceans have fundamentally changed since the dinosaur era
Fossils of giant sea lizard show how our oceans have fundamentally changed since the dinosaur era
The oceans were full of large apex predators 66 million years ago, in contrast to modern times.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 19.02.2024
Little African duckbill dinosaurs provide evidence of an unlikely ocean crossing
Little African duckbill dinosaurs provide evidence of an unlikely ocean crossing
New species of duckbill dinosaur found in Africa indicates they were diverse, with at least three species inhabiting north Africa at the end of the Cretaceous.

Environment - Paleontology - 07.02.2024
66 million-year history of carbon dioxide shows climate is highly sensitive to greenhouse gases
66 million-year history of carbon dioxide shows climate is highly sensitive to greenhouse gases
The last time atmospheric carbon dioxide consistently reached today's human-driven levels was 14 million years ago, researchers have found.

Paleontology - Art and Design - 24.10.2023
Manchester palaeontologist to hit Hollywood red carpet ahead of lead role in international dinosaur documentary

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 13.09.2023
Nature's great survivors: Flowering plants survived the mass extinction that killed the dinosaurs
Nature’s great survivors: Flowering plants survived the mass extinction that killed the dinosaurs
New Milner Centre for Evolution study tracks how "flower power" survived mass extinction 66 million years ago to become the dominant plant type Published on Wednesday 13 September 2023 Last updated on Wednesday 13 September 2023 A new study by researchers from the University of Bath (UK) and Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (Mexico) shows that flowering plants escaped relatively unscathed from the mass extinction that killed the dinosaurs 66 million years ago.

Paleontology - 23.08.2023
Fossils of 'primitive cousins of T rex' shed light on the end of the age of dinosaurs in Africa
Fossils of ’primitive cousins of T rex’ shed light on the end of the age of dinosaurs in Africa
Fossils of two new abelisaurs have been discovered in Morocco, showing the diversity of dinosaurs in this region at the end of the Cretaceous period.

Paleontology - 14.06.2023
First hominin muscle reconstruction shows 3.2 million-year-old 'Lucy' could stand as erect as we can
First hominin muscle reconstruction shows 3.2 million-year-old ’Lucy’ could stand as erect as we can
Digital modelling of legendary fossil's soft tissue suggests Australopithecus afarensis had powerful leg and pelvic muscles suited to tree dwelling, but knee muscles that allowed fully erect walking.

Paleontology - Environment - 20.04.2023
Acclaimed British dinosaur hunter to headline Wyoming’s ’Jurassic Fest’

Paleontology - History / Archeology - 16.02.2023
Giant meat-eating dinosaur footprint is largest found in Yorkshire
An almost metre-long footprint made by a giant, meat-eating theropod dinosaur from the Jurassic Period represents the largest of its kind ever found in Yorkshire. Curiously, the unusual footprint appears to capture the moment that the dinosaur rested or crouched down some 166 million years ago. The Yorkshire coast is renowned for producing some visually and scientifically incredible fossils, including thousands of dinosaur footprints.

Paleontology - 17.01.2023
Opinion: Let's face reality. Fossil fuel interests have destroyed the Cops - we need something new
Opinion: Let’s face reality. Fossil fuel interests have destroyed the Cops - we need something new

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 24.08.2022
Fossils of giant sea lizard that ruled the oceans 66 million years ago
Fossils of giant sea lizard that ruled the oceans 66 million years ago
Fossils of a giant killer mosasaur have been discovered, along with the fossilised remains of its prey.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 29.07.2022
'Fossil Fishing at the Farm' - Jurassic marine world unearthed in a farmer's field
’Fossil Fishing at the Farm’ - Jurassic marine world unearthed in a farmer’s field
The discovery of an exceptional prehistoric site containing the remains of animals that lived in a tropical sea has been made in a farmer's field in Gloucestershire. Discovered beneath a field grazed by an ancient breed of English Longhorn cattle, the roughly 183-million-year-old fossils are stunningly well preserved like they were frozen in time.

Paleontology - Environment - 26.07.2022
Plesiosaur fossils found in the Sahara suggest they weren't just marine animals
Plesiosaur fossils found in the Sahara suggest they weren’t just marine animals
This discovery of plesiosaur fossils in an ancient riverbed suggests some species, traditionally thought to be sea creatures, may have lived in freshwater.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 18.07.2022
Opinion: Ancient salamander was hidden inside mystery rock for 50 years
Opinion: Ancient salamander was hidden inside mystery rock for 50 years
Writing in The Conversation, Dr Marc Jones and Professor Susan Evans (UCL Cell & Developmental Biology) and Professor Richard Benson (University of Oxford) write about their research into a newly-identified extinct salamander species found in Scotland.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 10.05.2022
Chile's first complete ichthyosaur recovered from a glacier in Patagonia
Chile’s first complete ichthyosaur recovered from a glacier in Patagonia
The fossilised remains of Chile's first complete ichthyosaur have been unearthed from a melting glacier deep in the Patagonia area of the South American country.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 10.05.2022
Whales evolved in three rapid phases, reveals largest study of its kind
Whales evolved in three rapid phases, reveals largest study of its kind
The diversity seen in whale skulls was achieved through three key periods of rapid evolution, reveals a new study led by researchers at UCL and the Natural History Museum. The study, published in Current Biology , gathered the most expansive 3D scan data set ever for Cetacea (whale) skulls spanning 88 living species (representing 95% of extant cetacean species) and 113 fossil species and covering 50 million years of evolution.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 21.12.2021
An ancient relative of Velociraptor is unearthed in Great Britain
An ancient relative of Velociraptor is unearthed in Great Britain
A new bird-like dinosaur has been found by paleontologists combing through fossils found on the Isle of Wight.

Paleontology - Environment - 04.10.2021
New 'lost relative' of Triceratops found in New Mexico
New ’lost relative’ of Triceratops found in New Mexico
The skeleton fragments of a new horned dinosaur, Sierraceratops turneri, have been discovered in North America.

Environment - Paleontology - 22.07.2021
Huge Jurassic seabed uncovered in Cotswolds quarry
Huge Jurassic seabed uncovered in Cotswolds quarry
One of the largest and most important finds of exquisitely preserved Jurassic echinoderms - spiny-skinned marine animals such as starfish and sea urchins - has been uncovered by a University of Birmingham Research Associate.

Paleontology - 09.03.2021
Younger Tyrannosaurus Rex bites were less ferocious than their adult counterparts
Younger Tyrannosaurus Rex bites were less ferocious than their adult counterparts
By closely examining the jaw mechanics of juvenile and adult tyrannosaurids, some of the fiercest dinosaurs to inhabit earth, scientists led by the University of Bristol have uncovered differences in how they bit into their prey.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 21.12.2020
Study resolves the position of fleas on the tree of life
A study of more than 1,400 protein-coding genes of fleas has resolved one of the longest standing mysteries in the evolution of insects, reordering their placement in the tree of life and pinpointing who their closest relatives are. The University of Bristol study, published in the journal Palaeoentomology , drew on the largest insect molecular dataset available.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 16.10.2020
World’s greatest mass extinction triggered switch to warm-bloodedness
The origin of endothermy in synapsids, including the ancestors of mammals. The diagram shows the evolution of main groups through the Triassic, and the scale from blue to red is a measure of the degree of warm-bloodedness reconstructed based on different indicators of bone structure and anatomy.

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 29.05.2020
When Somerset lay beneath the sea
The evidence consists of limestone pebbles that carry borings made by molluscs as well as oysters. These pebbles were torn up from the underlying Carboniferous limestone which formed the basic landscape all over Somerset and across the Severn Estuary to South Wales.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 31.01.2020
Our image of dinosaurs was shaped by Victorian popularity contests
Our knowledge of dinosaurs has expanded greatly since the public first became aware of their existence, but the history of these animals encompasses more than just the fossils themselves, writes Richard Fallon (UCL Science & Technology Studies).

Paleontology - 17.04.2019
Trix the T. rex is ready for her big Glasgow reveal

Paleontology - Environment - 12.04.2019
Trix the T. rex arrives in Glasgow

Paleontology - 10.04.2019
Tentacled ’Cthulhu’ fossil reconstruction reveals monstrous relative of modern sea cucumbers

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 25.02.2019
Bristol undergraduate reconstructs the skulls of two species of ancient reptile
Using two partially fragmented fossil skulls, a student at the University of Bristol has digitally reconstructed, in three-dimensions, the skulls of two species of ancient reptile that lived in the Late Triassic, one of which had been previously known only from its jaws.

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 04.02.2019
Glasgow will face off with a new dinosaur as Trix the T.rex comes to Town
Image courtesy of Naturalis Visitors to Glasgow will get an amazing opportunity to see one of the best preserved Tyrannosaurus rex skeletons when it visits Scotland on the last leg of its European tour.

Paleontology - 17.09.2018
Tiny fossils reveal how shrinking was essential for successful evolution

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 26.07.2018
Classic fossil site re-explored in undergraduate project
Aust Cliff near Bristol has been known as a rich fossil site since the 1820s. Since then, thousands of people have visited this spectacular location on the banks of the Severn, and collected fossils of ancient sharks and sea dragons.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 09.07.2018
Innovative online Birmingham courses produce first graduates
A new species of ancient reptile has been described by scientists at the University of Birmingham, filling a critical gap in the fossil record of dinosaur cousins and suggesting that some features thought to characterise dinosaurs evolved much earlier than previously thought. Described in a paper published today in Nature, the carnivorous reptile, Teleocrater rhadinus, was approximately 7-10 feet in length, had a long neck and tail, and walked on four crocodile-like legs.