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Health - Social Sciences - 26.03.2020
Opinion: why we need to consult engineers as well as scientists for solutions
Dr Adam Cooper (UCL STEaPP) argues that the current response to Covid-19 coronavirus would be improved if the expertise of engineers was better utilised. The coronavirus outbreak has shone a bright light on the use of experts and scientific advice. In the UK the prime minister, Boris Johnson, is flanked by his chief scientist and chief medical officer when giving updates about his response to the outbreak - emphasising that it is driven by scientific advice.

Social Sciences - Health - 24.03.2020
Repeat offenders’ lifestyles ’may put them at higher risk of coronavirus’
The “impulsive and risk-taking” lifestyles of repeat offenders means they are likely to be at higher risk of catching - and spreading - coronavirus, a leading criminologist suggests. Working with criminologists at Cambridge University, Professor Jonathan Shepherd, a surgeon and Cardiff University criminologist, found clear links between anti-social lifestyles and poor health.

Social Sciences - 11.03.2020
Baboon mothers carry their dead infant up to ten days
Baboon mothers living in the wild carry dead infants for up to ten days, according to a new study led by UCL and Université de Montpellier. The research, published in Royal Society Open Science , is the most extensive study on baboons, reporting on 12 cases of group responses to infants' deaths, including a miscarriage and two stillbirths, recorded over 13 years in wild Namibian chacma baboons.

Social Sciences - 11.03.2020
Are non-smoking young adults who use e-cigarettes more likely to smoke in the future?
Researchers from the University of Bristol's Tobacco and Alcohol Research Group (TARG), with support from Bristol's MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit (IEU) and the NIHR Bristol Biomedical Research Centre (BRC), combined the results of 17 studies to investigate whether e-cigarette use compared to non-use in young non-smokers is associated with subsequent cigarette smoking.

Health - Social Sciences - 10.03.2020
Dramatic increase in bowel cancer in young adults in England
Using NHS patient data from the last 40 years, the research led by Adam Chambers at the University of Bristol and UH Bristol , looked at more than 55,000 cases of colorectal (bowel) cancer over 40 years in England. Adam Chambers, Honorary Senior Research Associate in the School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine at the University of Bristol and Colorectal Registrar at UH Bristol , said: "Age has always been a major risk factor for bowel cancer, with the majority of cases being diagnosed in patients over 60 and therefore bowel cancer screening has focused on older age groups.

Social Sciences - Health - 03.03.2020
Minorities’ higher psychosis risk linked to cultural distance from majority
Social inequalities and language differences could be responsible for the higher psychosis risk in ethnic minority groups, finds a UCL-led study. The researchers say their findings, published today in Psychological Medicine , might reflect the impact of being more marginalised from mainstream society.

Social Sciences - Health - 03.03.2020
Hunter gatherers facilitated a cultural revolution through small social networks
Hunter-gatherer ancestors, from around 300,000 years ago, facilitated a cultural revolution by developing ideas in small social networks, and regularly drawing on knowledge from neighbouring camps, suggests a new study by UCL and University of Zurich. The study, published in Science Advances , mapped close-range social interactions of Agta hunter-gatherers in the Philippines using radio sensor technology to record close range interactions between individuals every hour for one month.

Health - Social Sciences - 26.02.2020
Major studies to explore the use of mobile phones on health
Researchers are leading extensive studies into the health impacts of mobile phone use. Professor Paul Elliott, Chair in Epidemiology and Public Health Medicine at Imperial College London, is leading two studies to investigate whether there is a link between the use of mobile phones and long-term health problems in adults and adolescents.

Health - Social Sciences - 26.02.2020
Mobile phone use triggers frequent headaches and lack of sleep
Extensive use of mobile phone is linked to increased headaches and poor sleep, says an Imperial expert. Professor Paul Elliott, Chair in Epidemiology and Public Health Medicine at Imperial College London, is leading two studies to investigate whether there is a link between the use of mobile phones and long-term health problems in adults and adolescents.

Media - Social Sciences - 25.02.2020
Analysis: How do those bereaved by suicide respond to media reports?
Guidelines on reporting suicide are aimed at preventing further suicides and minimising distress to the bereaved. Here Dr Alexandra Pitman (UCL Psychiatry) writes about her research looking at how relatives of suicide victims respond to news, and speaks to others in the field. You are a junior reporter on a busy local newspaper.

Social Sciences - 25.02.2020
Life expectancy not improving for first time in 100 years
For the first time in more than 100 years life expectancy has failed to increase across the country, and for the poorest 10% of women it has actually declined, according to a new report from Sir Michael Marmot and the UCL Institute of Health Equity. 10 years on since Sir Marmot first published the Marmot Review, the new report confirms that over the last decade health inequalities have widened overall, and the amount of time people spend in poor health has increased since 2010.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 18.02.2020
Lifelong antisocial behaviour linked to brain structure differences
People who engage in persistent antisocial behaviour long after adolescence have characteristic differences in brain structure, finds a new UCL-led study. The study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry , identified brain differences between people who engage in antisocial behaviour - such as theft, aggression, violence, bullying, lying, or repeated failure to take care of work or school responsibilities - only during adolescence and those who persist throughout adulthood.

Transport - Social Sciences - 18.02.2020
Uber linked to a reduction in serious road traffic injuries in the UK
A study by University of Oxford researchers, published today in Social Science & Medicine , has found that ride-hailing provider, Uber, is associated with a 9% decline in serious road accident injuries in the UK. However, that relative improvement is counterbalanced by the fact that there was an increase in slight road accident injuries in London.

Social Sciences - 17.02.2020
Researchers looking for men to take part in new domestic violence study
Researchers looking for men to take part in new domestic violence study
The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) funded REPROVIDE study at the University of Bristol's Centre for Academic Primary Care has developed a 23-week group programme for men that aims to help them understand and change their behaviour. The study aims to assess the effectiveness of the programme for the men taking part and in terms of the safety and wellbeing of their partner or ex-partner.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 17.02.2020
Researchers develop new tool to help detect hidden signs of autism in adults
Researchers have developed a potential new tool to help clinicians detect hidden signs of autism in adults. Autism is usually diagnosed in childhood but a growing number of adults are being diagnosed with the condition, even in mid-to-late adulthood. Many adults develop compensatory psychological strategies to hide their symptoms from clinicians, employers and even their own families.

Social Sciences - 12.02.2020
Sitting still linked to increased risk of depression in adolescents
Too much time sitting still - sedentary behaviour - is linked to an increased risk of depressive symptoms in adolescents, finds a new UCL-led study. The Lancet Psychiatry study found that an additional 60 minutes of light activity (such as walking or doing chores) daily at age 12 was associated with a 10% reduction in depressive symptoms at age 18.

Social Sciences - Health - 11.02.2020
E-cigarettes may be helping disadvantaged smokers to quit
New research confirms that low numbers of young people are vaping (using e-cigarettes), with vaping more common in young people from disadvantaged households who had never smoked before. The study, led by the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow and published today in BMC Public Health, also found that while disadvantaged adult smokers were less likely to have quit smoking, this inequality was smaller among those who vaped, suggesting vaping may be helping this group of smokers to quit.

Social Sciences - Environment - 11.02.2020
Using the power of pop to change minds over sea turtle meat consumption
Using the power of pop to change minds over sea turtle meat consumption
Researchers at the University of Oxford and Programa Tatô have developed a catchy way to reach communities on the island of São Tomé, in West Africa. Having utilised consumer research methods to source answers anonymously, they discovered that people have high levels of trust in TV and radio. Using these insights, they persuaded the island's favourite singer, João Seria, to produce an original music video with a song called 'Mém di Omali' which means, Mother of the Sea.

Social Sciences - Health - 30.01.2020
Insights into child mental health in Scotland
National adolescent study reveals insights into child mental health in Scotland A national report, carried out every four years, has provided insights into child mental health in Scotland. The 2018 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study in Scotland, led by researchers at the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow and funded by NHS Health Scotland, provides data on the health and wellbeing of the nation's young people.

Social Sciences - 29.01.2020
Brain networks come 'online' during adolescence to prepare teenagers for adult life
Brain networks come ’online’ during adolescence to prepare teenagers for adult life
New brain networks come 'online' during adolescence, allowing teenagers to develop more complex adult social skills, but potentially putting them at increased risk of mental illness, according to new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) .
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