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Health - Social Sciences - 21.01.2020
Health gap between rich and poor has widened
The health of the poorest people in Britain has declined since the mid-20th century, and is worse when compared to those born a century ago, suggests a new UCL-led study. The study, published in the BMJ Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health , compared health and income data from more than 200,000 working-age adults who were born between 1920 and 1970.

Social Sciences - Environment - 21.01.2020
New housing design in England overwhelmingly ’mediocre’ or ’poor’
The design of new housing developments in England is overwhelmingly 'mediocre' or 'poor', with less-affluent communities the worst affected, according to a national audit conducted by UCL for CPRE, the countryside charity, and the Place Alliance. A housing design audit for England reveals that 75% of new housing development should not have gone ahead due to 'mediocre' or 'poor' design.

Social Sciences - 20.01.2020
Clubs and bars must support women by cracking down on sexual aggression
Nightclubs and bars must create a supportive environment that cracks down on unwanted sexual attention and allows women to enjoy their nights out, according to a new study. Increasing numbers of women are prepared to speak back to sexual harassment whilst enjoying a night out with female friends by confronting the men responsible and telling them clearly and robustly that their behaviour is unacceptable.

Pharmacology - Social Sciences - 20.01.2020
Racial disparities in drug prescriptions for dementia
Disparities in drug prescribing suggest that black and Asian people with dementia are not receiving the same quality of care as their white peers, according to a new UCL-led study in the UK. Asian people with dementia are less likely to receive anti-dementia drugs, and take them for shorter periods, according to the findings published in Clinical Epidemiology .

Social Sciences - 17.01.2020
Older ethnic minority adults have fewer close friends
Older adults from ethnic minority groups report having fewer close friends and fewer friends who live locally than older white people, according a new UCL study. The research, published in  Ageing & Society , found that Black and Asian adults over the age of 65 years are almost twice as likely to report having no close friends (9% and 7% respectively) compared to White and mixed or 'other' ethnicity adults of the same age (both 4%).

Environment - Social Sciences - 16.01.2020
Small change for climate change: Why research funding to save the world needs to be drastically stepped up
Small change for climate change: Why research funding to save the world needs to be drastically stepped up
Researchers from the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs and the University of Sussex analysed USD 1.3 trillion of research funding around the world. Between 1990 and 2018, less than 4.59% of the funding was spent on climate-related research. Only 0.12% of the research funding was spent on a critical issue: how to change societies to mitigate climate change.

Social Sciences - 16.01.2020
Far-right violence in Portugal draws strength from skinhead roots - study
Far-right agitators in Portugal now have different reasons to their 1970s predecessors for becoming radicalised and committing acts of political violence - a new study shows. Influenced by the international ‘skinhead' movement from the mid-1980s, current extremists drawn largely from the working classes have turned to violence to ‘protect' white Portugal and Europe against the ‘threat' posed by multi-racial and multicultural society.

Social Sciences - Health - 16.01.2020
Lifetime suicide risk factors identified
A new review of previous studies into suicide worldwide has highlighted the effects of individual and environmental risk factors over a lifetime.

Social Sciences - Health - 14.01.2020
Wealth adds nine years to ’healthy’ life expectancy
The wealthiest men and women can expect to live an additional eight to nine years free from disability compared to people in the poorest groups, according to new UCL-led research.

Social Sciences - Health - 13.01.2020
Rising temperatures may cause over 2000 fatal injuries per year in the US
A 2 degrees Celsius rise in temperatures could result in around 2,100 additional deaths from injuries every year in the United States. This is the finding of research from Imperial College London , Columbia University and Harvard University , published Medicine. In the study, funded by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Wellcome Trust, the researchers calculated the number of additional fatal injuries that would occur in the US if temperatures rose by 1.5 and 2 degrees Celsius.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 27.12.2019
Take part in Dry January and you'll reap the benefits for months, Sussex research shows
Take part in Dry January and you’ll reap the benefits for months, Sussex research shows
New research from the University of Sussex shows that people who take part in Dry January - living alcohol-free for a month - are still drinking less six months later. In the most robust research on the subject to date, the study, led by University of Sussex psychologist Dr Richard de Visser , compared the experiences of participants in the Dry January 2019 challenge with adult drinkers who did not take part.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 24.12.2019
Large scale feasts at ancient capital of Ulster drew crowds from across Iron Age Ireland, new evidence reveals
Large scale feasts at ancient capital of Ulster drew crowds from across Iron Age Ireland, new evidence reveals
People transported animals over huge distances for mass gatherings at one of Ireland's most iconic archaeological sites, research concludes. Dr Richard Madgwick of Cardiff University led the study, which analysed the bones of 35 animals excavated from Navan Fort, the legendary capital of Ulster. Researchers from Queen's University Belfast, Memorial University Newfoundland and the British Geological Survey were also involved in the research.

Social Sciences - 19.12.2019
Theatre and museum trips linked to living longer
Older people who engage with the arts live longer than those who take part infrequently or not at all, according to UCL research. The study, published today in the BMJ , measured engagement in the 'receptive arts' such as going to the theatre, concerts, opera, museums, art galleries and exhibitions, and linked this to mortality.

Social Sciences - Environment - 18.12.2019
Depression and suicide risk linked to air pollution
People exposed to higher levels of air pollution are more likely to experience depression or die by suicide, finds a new analysis led by UCL. The first systematic review and meta-analysis of evidence connecting air pollution and a range of mental health problems, published in Environmental Health Perspectives , reviewed study data from 16 countries.

Social Sciences - 18.12.2019
Meerkat mobs do ’war dance’ to protect territory
Meerkat clans perform a 'war dance' to frighten opponents and protect their territory, according to a new UCL and University of Cambridge study. The study, published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B , is the first empirical study to reveal intergroup aggression. The researchers, who monitored hundreds of these intergroup encounters over 11 years, show that meetings between meerkat clans often turn aggressive and sometimes escalate to fighting and lethal violence.

Social Sciences - 18.12.2019
As Sussex research programme ends, findings continue to influence policy on migration and poverty
After nearly a decade, the Migrating out of Poverty Research Programme (MOOP) is drawing to a close, having conducted research in more than ten countries in an effort to uncover how and why migration plays such a significant role in poverty reduction in some contexts, but not in others. Funded by the UK's Department for International Development, MOOP has built up a robust body of evidence on the relationship between migration and poverty, with research feeding directly into regional policy in the global South, and cited in international reports on development.

Social Sciences - 17.12.2019
Palliative care services lag behind rapid growth in global need
Just 14% of people in the world population have access to palliative care services that allow people to die with dignity and alleviate their suffering, according to new research led by the University of Glasgow. And more than half of the world's population - mainly in low and middle-income countries - have very poor or non-existent access to palliative care.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 05.12.2019
Social influencers: what can we learn from animals?
Research from Oxford University calls us to reconsider how behaviours may spread through societies of wild animals, and how this might provide new insights into human social networks. Our social connections to one another, whether it be online or in real life, give rise to our 'social networks'. Previously, it has often been assumed that the individuals with the most social connections are the primary 'social influencers' and most likely to acquire, and spread, new behaviours.

Health - Social Sciences - 04.12.2019
Young women face unnecessary surgery for suspected appendicitis - study
Thousands of young women are unnecessarily admitted to UK hospitals and undergo surgery they do not need each year in the NHS, according to a new study. Surgery for appendicitis is one of the world's most common emergency operations. UK hospitals exhibit the world's highest rate of ‘normal appendicectomy,' where patients undergo surgery for suspected appendicitis but laboratory examination of the removed appendix finds it to be normal.

Social Sciences - 04.12.2019
Sleep helps memory, right? Not for eyewitnesses
New research investigating the effect of sleep on eyewitness memory has found that having a period of sleep, compared to a period of wake, does not improve eyewitness identification accuracy. The research team, led by PhD student, David Morgan at Royal Holloway, University of London, Professor Laura Mickes, senior author at the University of Bristol and including researchers from Royal Holloway, the Universities of California, USA and Birmingham, and funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) is published today [4 December] in Royal Society Open Science .
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