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Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 10:05
Source of hazardous high-energy particles located in the Sun
The source of potentially hazardous solar particles, released from the Sun at high speed during storms in its outer atmosphere, has been located for the first time by researchers at UCL and George Mason University, Virginia, USA. These particles are highly charged and, if they reach Earth's atmosphere, can potentially disrupt satellites and electronic infrastructure, as well as pose a radiation risk to astronauts and people in airplanes.

Physics - Chemistry - 02.03.2021
Through the looking glass: artificial ’molecules’ open door to ultrafast devices
Researchers from the University of Cambridge and Skoltech in Russia have shown that polaritons, the quirky particles that may end up running the quantum supercomputers of the future, can form structures that behave like molecules - and these 'artificial molecules' can potentially be engineered on demand.

Physics - 01.03.2021
Photon-photon polaritons: the intriguing particles that emerge when two photons couple
Researchers exploring the interactions between light particles, photons and matter find that optical microresonators host quasiparticles made by two photons. Last updated on Tuesday 2 March 2021 Scientists at the University of Bath have found a way to bind together two photons of different colours, paving the way for important advancements in quantum-electrodynamics - the field of science that describes how light and matter interact.

Health - Physics - 24.02.2021
Identification of 'violent' processes that cause wheezing could lead to better diagnosis and treatment for lung disease
Identification of ’violent’ processes that cause wheezing could lead to better diagnosis and treatment for lung disease
A team of engineers has identified the 'violent' physical processes at work inside the lungs which cause wheezing, a condition that affects up to a quarter of the world's population. Since wheezing is associated with so many conditions, it is difficult to be sure of what is wrong with a patient just based on the wheeze Anurag Agarwal The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, used modelling and high-speed video techniques to show what causes wheezing and how to predict it.

Physics - Life Sciences - 24.02.2021
Video of ’dancing DNA’ developed by researchers
Videos showing for the first time how small circles of DNA adopt dance-like movements have been developed by a team led by researchers at UCL and the Universities of Leeds, York and Sheffield. The footage is based on some of the highest resolution images of a single molecule of DNA ever captured, with DNA seen to "dance" in microscopy data recorded at the London Centre for Nanotechnology at UCL.  The images show in unprecedented detail how the stresses and strains that are placed on DNA when it is crammed inside cells can change its shape.

Life Sciences - Physics - 16.02.2021
Visualisation of 'dancing DNA'
Visualisation of ’dancing DNA’
Videos showing for the first time how small circles of DNA adopt dance-like movements inside a cell have been developed by researchers in Yorkshire. The footage, created by a team of scientists from the Universities of Leeds, Sheffield and York, and recorded at UCL, is based on the highest resolution images of a single molecule of DNA ever captured.

Physics - Computer Science - 15.02.2021
Light used to detect quantum information stored in 100,000 nuclear quantum bits
Light used to detect quantum information stored in 100,000 nuclear quantum bits
Researchers have found a way to use light and a single electron to communicate with a cloud of quantum bits and sense their behaviour, making it possible to detect a single quantum bit in a dense cloud. We don't have a way of 'talking' to the cloud and the cloud doesn't have a way of talking to us. But what we can talk to is an electron: we can communicate with it sort of like a dog that herds sheep Mete Atatüre The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, were able to inject a 'needle' of highly fragile quantum information in a 'haystack' of 100,000 nuclei.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 12.02.2021
Astronomers identify new method of planet formation
Astronomers identify new method of planet formation
Scientists have suggested a new explanation for the abundance in intermediate-mass exoplanets - a long-standing puzzle in astronomy. In the last 25 years, scientists have discovered over 4000 planets outside our solar system. From relatively small rock and water worlds to blisteringly hot gas giants, these planets display a remarkable variety.

Health - Physics - 11.02.2021
Advances in x-ray imaging can help patients with breast cancer
A new x-ray imaging scanner to help surgeons performing breast tumour removal surgery has been developed by UCL experts. Most breast cancer operations are what are known as conserving surgeries, which remove the cancerous tumour rather than the whole breast. Second operations are often required if the margins (edges) of the extracted tissue are found to not be clear of cancer.

Physics - Environment - 10.02.2021
New research will disrupt solar and expedite efforts toward Net-Zero target
New research will disrupt solar and expedite efforts toward Net-Zero target
A team of researchers, led by chemists from the University of Bristol, has received significant funding from the UKRI to revolutionise the fabrication and application of photovoltaic devices, used to produce solar energy. Imagine a city in the near future where buildings have solar panels integrated into windows, cladding and rooftops - allowing urban areas to generate their own clean and renewable energy.

Physics - Materials Science - 08.02.2021
'Magnetic graphene' forms a new kind of magnetism
’Magnetic graphene’ forms a new kind of magnetism
Researchers have identified a new form of magnetism in so-called magnetic graphene, which could point the way toward understanding superconductivity in this unusual type of material. The researchers, led by the University of Cambridge, were able to control the conductivity and magnetism of iron thiophosphate (FePS 3 ), a two-dimensional material which undergoes a transition from an insulator to a metal when compressed.

Materials Science - Physics - 08.02.2021
Newly-developed material could lead to lighter, safer car designs
A new form of 3D-printed material made by combining commonly-used plastics with carbon nanotubes is tougher and lighter than similar forms of aluminium, scientists say. The material could lead to the development of safer, lighter and more durable structures for use in the aerospace, automotive, renewables and marine industries.

Mathematics - Physics - 08.02.2021
'Multiplying' light could be key to ultra-powerful optical computers
’Multiplying’ light could be key to ultra-powerful optical computers
New type of optical computing could solve highly complex problems that are out of reach for even the most powerful supercomputers. An important class of challenging computational problems, with applications in graph theory, neural networks, artificial intelligence and error-correcting codes can be solved by multiplying light signals, according to researchers from the University of Cambridge and Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology in Russia.

Physics - 08.02.2021
Physicists finesse the storing of light to create rainbows of colour
Physicists at the University of Bath have found a way to use resonance to harness the energy of light more effectively inside microresonators. Last updated on Monday 8 February 2021 In nature, as in everyday life, we are surrounded by resonance - the phenomenon that describes how each object has a frequency that it prefers to vibrate at.

Physics - 04.02.2021
Holography ’quantum leap’ could revolutionise imaging
A new type of quantum holography which uses entangled photons to overcome the limitations of conventional holographic approaches could lead to improved medical imaging and speed the advance of quantum information science. A team of physicists from the University of Glasgow are the first in the world to find a way to use quantum-entangled photons to encode information in a hologram.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 21.01.2021
Magnetic waves explain mystery of Sun’s outer layer
A theory as to why the Sun's outer atmosphere differs in its chemical make-up from its inner layers has been confirmed by direct observation for the first time by scientists at UCL and the Italian Space Agency. The Sun's extremely hot outer layer, the corona, has a very different chemical composition from the cooler inner layers, but the reason for this has puzzled scientists for decades.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 13.01.2021
UofG supports major quantum technology effort to solve universe’s mysteries
The University of Glasgow's James Watt School of Engineering is providing key expertise for a new project which has won funding from UK Research and Innovation (UKRI). The Quantum-enhanced Interferometry for New Physics project, led by Cardiff University, is one of seven projects which aim to transform our understanding of the universe.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 13.01.2021
Quantum tech to help weigh universe’s most elusive particle
Researchers are leading a £3.8 million project to develop quantum technology aimed at detecting the mass of a neutrino, the universe's most abundant but elusive particle of matter. UCL is playing a key role in three of the seven projects. Neutrinos are millions of times lighter than electrons and are poorly understood as they can pass through matter undetected.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 13.01.2021
Scientists to lead hunt for dark matter
Cardiff University scientists are to lead a consortium hoping to track down one of the most mysterious materials in the Universe - dark matter. The £5m Quantum-Enhanced Interferometry (QI) collaboration will use state-of-the-art quantum technology to shed more light on the material which makes up roughly 27 per cent of the Universe but has yet to be directly detected.

Physics - Mathematics - 18.12.2020
UofG researchers set out for New Horizons
Researchers from the University of Glasgow's College of Science & Engineering are sharing in new funding for adventurous, high-risk research. Four projects from three Schools have received support from the £25.5m New Horizons fund, administered by the Engineering and Physical Science Research Council (EPSRC).
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