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Health - Physics - 22.01.2020
Magnetised molecules used to monitor breast cancer
Magnetised molecules used to monitor breast cancer
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Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 14.01.2020
X-rays and gravitational waves will combine to illuminate massive black hole collisions
A new study by a group of researchers at the University of Birmingham has found that collisions of supermassive black holes may be simultaneously observable in both gravitational waves and X-rays at the beginning of the next decade. The European Space Agency (ESA) has recently announced that its two major space observatories of the 2030s will have their launches timed for simultaneous use.

Chemistry - Physics - 10.01.2020
Unused stockpiles of nuclear waste could be more useful than we might think, according to new study
Chemists have found a new use for the waste product of nuclear power - transforming an unused stockpile into a versatile compound which could be used to create valuable commodity chemicals as well as new energy sources. Depleted uranium (DU) is a radioactive by-product from the process used to create nuclear energy.

Physics - 07.01.2020
Smoking may leave a legacy of increased pain even after quitting
Former daily smokers report higher levels of pain than people who have never smoked daily, and their pain levels are similar to people who currently smoke daily, according to a new UCL study The paper, published today in Addictive Behaviors, analysed data from just over 220,000 people in the UK aged 16+ who had never smoked daily, used to smoke daily, or currently smoked daily.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 06.01.2020
UofG gravitational astrophysicists celebrate neutron star collision observation
The publication of a new observation of gravitational wave data is being celebrated by researchers from the University of Glasgow's Institute for Gravitational Research, who helped support the international collaborations which made the detection possible. On April 25, 2019, the observatory known as LIGO Livingston picked up what appeared to be gravitational ripples from a collision of two neutron stars - only the second time this type of event has ever been observed by gravitational wave astronomy.

Physics - Computer Science / Telecom - 23.12.2019
First chip-to-chip quantum teleportation harnessing silicon photonic chip fabrication
First chip-to-chip quantum teleportation harnessing silicon photonic chip fabrication
The development of technologies which can process information based on the laws of quantum physics are predicted to have profound impacts on modern society. For example, quantum computers may hold the key to solving problems that are too complex for today's most powerful supercomputers, and a quantum internet could ultimately protect the worlds information from malicious attacks.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 19.12.2019
Ultrashort x-ray technique will probe conditions found at the heart of planets
Ultrashort x-ray technique will probe conditions found at the heart of planets
Combining powerful lasers and bright x-rays, Imperial and STFC researchers have demonstrated a technique that will allow new extreme experiments. The new technique would be able to use a single x-ray flash to capture information about extremely dense and hot matter, such as can be found inside gas giant planets or on the crusts of dead stars.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 06.12.2019
Analysis: A spacecraft is starting to unravel the sun’s biggest mysteries
NASA's Parker Solar Probe is going closer to the sun than any spacecraft has been before - Dr Daniel Verscharen (UCL Space & Climate Physics) writes about the findings so far. If you ask a child to paint a picture of the sun, you will most likely get a bright yellow circle on a piece of paper. This is actually quite accurate, given that the sun is a ball of hot gas and that its surface (called the photosphere) mostly shines in bright yellow light.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 04.12.2019
Closest-ever approach to the Sun gives new insights into the solar wind
Closest-ever approach to the Sun gives new insights into the solar wind
The Parker Solar Probe spacecraft, which has flown closer to the Sun than any mission before, has found new evidence of the origins of the solar wind. NASA's Parker Solar Probe was launched in August 2018. Its first results are published today in a series of four papers in Nature , with Imperial College London scientists among those interpreting some of the key data to reveal how the solar wind is accelerated away from the surface of the Sun.

Chemistry - Physics - 27.11.2019
Cutting nanoparticles down to size - new study
A new technique in chemistry could pave the way for producing uniform nanoparticles for use in drug delivery systems. Scientists have been investigating how to make better use of nanoparticles in medicine for several decades. Significantly smaller than an average cell, nanoparticles are more similar in size to proteins.

Physics - Materials Science - 27.11.2019
What protects killer immune cells from harming themselves?
White blood cells, which release a toxic potion of proteins to kill cancerous and virus-infected cells, are protected from any harm by the physical properties of their cell envelopes, find scientists from UCL and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne. Until now, it has been a mystery to scientists how these white blood cells - called cytotoxic lymphocytes - avoid being killed by their own actions and the discovery could help explain why some tumours are more resistant than others to recently developed cancer immunotherapies.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 25.11.2019
Imperial among UK institutions building parts for new 30m neutrino detector
Imperial among UK institutions building parts for new 30m neutrino detector
Researchers at Imperial are starting work on a huge new neutrino experiment, aiming to understand the origin and structure of the universe. The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), to be assembled in the US, will have components designed and built by institutions across the UK, including Imperial.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 21.11.2019
Experiment to increase understanding of the universe secures 30m
UCL scientists working to understand neutrinos and antimatter through DUNE (the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment) will benefit from the UK's latest multi-million pound investment in the project. The DUNE project brings together more than 1,000 physicists from the UK and 31 countries from Asia, Europe and the Americas to build the world's most advanced neutrino observatory, which could lead to profound changes in our understanding of the universe.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 20.11.2019
Cosmic explosions: detecting the highest-energy light
The most energetic form of light has been detected from a distant but powerful cosmic explosion known as a 'gamma-ray burst' for the first time, by an international team including UCL physicists using a UCL-built space telescope onboard NASA's Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory. The discovery and in particular, the unknown mechanisms that cause extremely high-energy light to be emitted in the afterglow of a gamma-ray burst (GRB).

Physics - Chemistry - 13.11.2019
Space rock research could reveal origins of Earth’s oceans
The return of a space probe bearing samples from a distant asteroid is being eagerly anticipated by researchers from the University of Glasgow and Curtin University in Australia. Scientists from the School of Geographical and Earth Sciences will receive three miniscule precious pieces of the asteroid Ryugu when the uncrewed Hayabusa2 mission returns to Earth late next year after six years in space.

Physics - Materials Science - 04.11.2019
Scientists spy unstable semiconductors
Scientists from Cardiff University have, for the first time, spotted previously unseen “instabilities” on the surface of a common compound semiconductor material. The findings could potentially have profound consequences for the development of future materials in the electronic devices that power our daily lives.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 29.10.2019
Particle detector for hunting dark matter installed a mile underground
Particle detector for hunting dark matter installed a mile underground
The central component of LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) - the largest direct-detection dark matter experiment in the US - has been slowly lowered 4,850 feet down a shaft formerly used in gold-mining operations by a team involving UCL physicists. Although dark matter accounts for about 27 percent of the universe, we do not know what it is made of and experiments have yet to make direct contact with a particle - it has only been detected through its gravitational effects on normal matter.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 28.10.2019
Mapping the universe in extraordinary detail using UCL lenses
A three-dimensional map of the Universe that reaches deeper in space and time than ever before is one step closer as final testing begins on the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI), designed and built in part by UCL physicists. From early 2020, DESI will observe the light from 35 million distant galaxies and 2.4 million quasars over five years to precisely map their distance from Earth and gauge how quickly they are moving away from us.

Materials Science - Physics - 15.10.2019
Physicists shed new light on how liquids behave with other materials
Using a range of theoretical and simulation approaches, physicists from the University of Bristol have shown that liquids in contact with substrates can exhibit a finite number of classes of behaviour and identify the important new ones. Their findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) , challenge the accepted wisdom on wetting and drying phase behaviour.

Materials Science - Physics - 11.10.2019
White blood cell 'security guard' and community messages: News from the College
White blood cell ’security guard’ and community messages: News from the College
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From a white blood cell playing a ‘security guard' role, to the President's call for collaboration and community, here is some quick-read news from across the College. Patrolling eye Researchers from Imperial have discovered a new ‘security guard' role for a type of white blood cell called a neutrophil.
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