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Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 19.08.2019
Lab-based dark energy experiment narrows search options for elusive force
An experiment to test a popular theory of dark energy has found no evidence of new forces, placing strong constraints on related theories. Dark energy is the name given to an unknown force that is causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate. It is very exciting to be able to discover something about the evolution of the universe using a table-top experiment in a London basement.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 08.08.2019
Scientists uncover deep-rooted plumbing system beneath ocean volcanoes
Cardiff University scientists have revealed the true extent of the internal ‘plumbing system' that drives volcanic activity around the world. An examination of pockets of magma contained within crystals has revealed that the large chambers of molten rock which feed volcanoes can extend to over 16 km beneath the Earth's surface.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 06.08.2019
Global team of scientists finish assembling next-generation dark matter detector
Global team of scientists finish assembling next-generation dark matter detector
The key component of the LUX-ZEPLIN experiment is ready to be sealed and lowered nearly 1.5 km underground, where it will search for dark matter. Dark matter is a mysterious form of matter thought to make up around 85% of the mass of the universe. However, because it is predicted to interact only very weakly with ordinary matter, it has so far not been detected.

Chemistry - Physics - 06.08.2019
Artificial tongue could have whisky counterfeiting licked
An artificial 'tongue' which can taste subtle differences between drams of whisky could help cut down on the trade in counterfeit alcohol, scientists say. In a new paper published today in the Royal Society of Chemistry's journal Nanoscale, Scottish engineers describe how they built the tiny taster, which exploits the optical properties of gold and aluminium to test the tipples.

Physics - 12.07.2019
Image of quantum entanglement
For the first time ever, physicists have managed to take a photo of a strong form of quantum entanglement called Bell entanglement - capturing visual evidence of an elusive phenomenon which a baffled Albert Einstein once called 'spooky action at a distance'. Two particles which interact with each other - like two photons passing through a beam splitter, for example - can sometimes remain connected, instantaneously sharing their physical states no matter how great the distance which separates them.

Physics - 10.07.2019
Quantum sensor breakthrough using naturally occurring vibrations in artificial atoms
Quantum sensor breakthrough using naturally occurring vibrations in artificial atoms
A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, have discovered a new method that could be used to build quantum sensors with ultra-high precision. When individual atoms emit light, they do so in discrete packets called photons. When this light is measured, this discrete or ‘granular' nature leads to especially low fluctuations in its brightness, as two or more photons are never emitted at the same time.

Physics - Innovation / Technology - 08.07.2019
New Semiconductor Technology for Future Data Communications
New Semiconductor Technology for Future Data Communications
Researchers have developed world-leading Compound Semiconductor (CS) technology that can drive future high-speed data communications. A team from Cardiff University worked to innovate an ultrafast and highly sensitive ‘avalanche photodiode' (APD) that creates less electronic ‘noise' than its silicon rivals.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 08.07.2019
Chameleon Theory could change our thoughts on gravity
Chameleon Theory could change our thoughts on gravity
Einstein's theory of General Relativity is world famous - but it might not be the only way to explain how gravity works and how galaxies form. Physicists at Durham University created huge supercomputer simulations of the universe to test an alternative theory. Our researchers found that f(R)-gravity - a so-called Chameleon Theory - could also explain the formation of structures in the cosmos.

Physics - Computer Science / Telecom - 02.07.2019
Generation and sampling of quantum states of light in a silicon chip
Generation and sampling of quantum states of light in a silicon chip
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Technical University of Denmark have found a promising new way to build the next generation of quantum simulators combining light and silicon micro-chips. In the roadmap to develop quantum machines able to compete and overcome classical supercomputers in solving specific problems, the scientific community is facing two main technological challenges.

Health - Physics - 28.06.2019
Mini 'magic' MRI scanner could diagnose knee injuries more accurately
Mini ’magic’ MRI scanner could diagnose knee injuries more accurately
Researchers at Imperial College London have developed a prototype mini MRI scanner that fits around a patient's leg. The team say the device - which uses so-called ‘magic angle' effect - could potentially help diagnose knee injuries more quickly, and more accurately. Knee injuries affect millions of people - and MRI scans are crucial to diagnosing the problem Dr Karyn Chappell Study author In a proof-of-concept study using animal knees, the results suggest the technology could be used to show all the structures of the knee.

Physics - 26.06.2019
Identifies Fukushima reactor material in environment
Identifies Fukushima reactor material in environment
Through the analysis of specific fallout particles in the environment, a joint UK-Japan team of scientists has uncovered new insights into the sequence of events that led to the Fukushima nuclear accident in March 2011. The multi-organisation research, led by Dr Peter Martin and Professor Tom Scott from the University of Bristol's South West Nuclear Hub in collaboration with scientists from Diamond Light Source, the UK's national synchrotron facility, and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), has been published today .

Health - Physics - 20.06.2019
Researchers harness AI to combat colon cancer
Researchers harness AI to combat colon cancer
Engineers have shown that it is technically possible to use an AI system to guide a tiny robotic capsule inside the colon to take microultrasound images. Known as a ‘Sonopill', the device could spell the end for painful endoscopic examinations for patients, where a semi-rigid scope is passed into the bowel.

Physics - 04.06.2019
3D magnetic interactions could lead to new forms of computing
A new form of magnetic interaction which pushes a formerly two-dimensional phenomenon into the third dimension could open up a host of exciting new possibilities for data storage and advanced computing, scientists say. In a new paper published today , a team led by physicists from the University of Glasgow describe how they have been found a new way to successfully pass information from a series of tiny magnets arrayed on an ultrathin film across to magnets on a second film below.

Physics - Materials Science - 29.05.2019
Experts develop nanolasers on silicon
Researchers at Cardiff University have shown tiny light-emitting nanolasers less than a tenth of the size of the width of a human hair can be integrated into silicon chip design. The photonic band-edge lasers can operate at superfast speeds and have the potential to help the global electronics industry deliver a range of new applications - from optical computing to remote sensing and heat seeking, Professor Diana Huffaker is Scientific Director of Cardiff University's Institute for Compound Semiconductors , based at Cardiff University's School of Physics and Astronomy.

Physics - Life Sciences - 21.05.2019
Cells develop a 'thicker skin' under extreme gravity
Cells develop a ’thicker skin’ under extreme gravity
A high-gravity experiment has revealed how cells keep their shape under pressure. Scientists have probed how cells respond to high gravity with a technique that could transform how we look at cellular life. Using the European Space Agency's (ESA) Large Diameter Centrifuge in the Netherlands, Imperial and ESA researchers spun cells at high speeds that simulate a gravitational force 15 times stronger than on Earth (15g).

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 03.05.2019
Have scientists observed a black hole swallowing a neutron star?
Have scientists observed a black hole swallowing a neutron star?
Within weeks of switching their machines back on to scour the sky for more sources of gravitational waves, scientists are poring over data in an attempt to further understand an unprecedented cosmic event. Astronomers working at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the European-based Virgo detector have reported the possible detection of gravitational waves emanating from the collision of a neutron star and a black hole.

Physics - 02.05.2019
Machine Learning paves the way for next-level quantum sensing
Machine Learning paves the way for next-level quantum sensing
University of Bristol researchers have reached new heights of sophistication in detecting magnetic fields with extreme sensitivity at room temperature by combining machine learning with a quantum sensor. The findings, published in Physical Review X, could lead to a new generation of MRI scanners which use magnetic fields and radio waves to produce detailed images of the inside of the body, as well as further potential uses within biology and material science.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 02.05.2019
UofG astrophysicists investigate two new neutron star collisions
Astrophysicists at the University of Glasgow are celebrating the detection of gravitational wave signals likely to be caused by the crashing of two neutron stars and what could be the first evidence of the collision of a neutron star and a black hole. The University of Glasgow researchers are key partners in the international scientific collaboration which made the new detections - the National Science Foundation's Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), based in the United States, and Virgo, based in Italy.

Physics - 25.04.2019
New insights into quantum measurements
Researchers from the University of Bristol have shed new light on the process of quantum measurement, one of the defining, and most quantum features of quantum mechanics. As reported in Physical Review Letters , Dr Paul Skrzypczyk and Professor Noah Linden looked at the way in which we gain information about the world at the quantum scale through the process of measurement.

Physics - Materials Science - 10.04.2019
Wonder material: individual 2D phosphorene nanoribbons made for the first time
Wonder material: individual 2D phosphorene nanoribbons made for the first time
Tiny, individual, flexible ribbons of crystalline phosphorus have been made and measured an international collaboration, in a world first, and they could revolutionise electronics and fast-charging battery technology. Since the isolation of 2-dimensional phosphorene (the phosphorus equivalent of graphene) in 2014, more than 100 theoretical studies have predicted that new and exciting and properties could emerge by producing narrow ‘ribbons' of this material.
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