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Health - Pharmacology - 12:06
Trial will look at new Parkinson’s treatment for frequent falls
Researchers have been awarded funding to trial a new treatment for frequent falls in patients with advanced Parkinson's. In Parkinson's disease, some parts of the brain begin to deteriorate, leading to symptoms including balance problems, which can increase the chances of falls. A team from Imperial College London and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust have been awarded £250,000 from the Medical Research Council (MRC) to trial a surgical implant that alters nerve activity, which could improve movement and reduce the number of falls.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.10.2019
Detecting the (almost) undetectable: new cancer alliance
Detecting the (almost) undetectable: new cancer alliance
UCL research teams are part of a new transatlantic research alliance to develop radical new strategies and technologies to detect cancer at its earliest stage. Cancer Research UK is the lead funder of the International Alliance for Cancer Early Detection (ACED), a £55m investment bringing together UCL, Canary Center at Stanford University, the University of Cambridge, the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, and the University of Manchester.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.10.2019
Researchers identify a new way to target treatment-resistant cancers
An international team of researchers has found a different way cancer becomes resistant to chemotherapy, suggesting a new target for drugs. Chemotherapy kills cancers cells by preventing them from multiplying and by inducing ‘cell death', a natural process that can be enhanced with drugs. One form of cell death, called ferroptosis - iron-dependent cell death - is caused by the degradation of fats (lipids) that make up the cell membrane.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 18.10.2019
New clinical research offers possibility of future rehabilitation for patients in vegetative and minimally conscious states
Non-invasive brain stimulation is to be trialed for the first time alongside advanced brain imaging techniques in patients who are minimally conscious or in a vegetative state. The study builds on promising results from the Centre for Human Brain Health at the University of Birmingham which suggested that non-invasive brain stimulation can improve the success of rehabilitation for non-responsive patients.

Pharmacology - Health - 16.10.2019
Global trial is first clear evidence that a widely available drug reduces head injury deaths
A low cost and widely available drug could reduce deaths in traumatic brain injury patients by as much as 20 per cent depending on the severity of injury, according to a major study carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham. The research, published in The Lancet, showed that tranexamic acid (TXA), a drug that prevents bleeding into the brain by inhibiting blood clot breakdown, has the potential to save hundreds of thousands of lives.

Pharmacology - 10.10.2019
Birmingham health research academics call for NHS to act on mental health patient feedback
Researchers from the University of Birmingham are today making a series of recommendations for improving the way that NHS mental health trusts collect and use patient feedback to improve the quality of care for mental health inpatients. As part of a collaborative study funded by NIHR, a team from the Universities of Birmingham, Warwick , Sheffield and Queen Mary University of London , together with the Mental Health Foundation interviewed staff and patients across NHS mental health trusts in England and found that few are collecting patient feedback to actively improve services.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.10.2019
Secrets of lung cancer spread found in patients' blood and biopsies
Secrets of lung cancer spread found in patients’ blood and biopsies
Early signs that a patient's lung cancer may spread and become untreatable can be picked up in samples of their blood and tumour, according to a trio of papers co-led by UCL. The three studies, published , are all part of Cancer Research UK's £14million TRACERx project, which aims to understand how lung cancer cells change over time and become resistant to treatment.

Health - Pharmacology - 02.10.2019
Gut bacteria 'fingerprint' predicts radiotherapy side effects
Gut bacteria ’fingerprint’ predicts radiotherapy side effects
Scientists have conducted the first clinical study to show a link between types of gut bacteria and radiotherapy-induced gut damage. Taking a ‘fingerprint' of the mix of bacteria in the gut can indicate how susceptible individual cancer patients are to gut damage as a result of radiotherapy for prostate and gynaecological cancers, the new study shows.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 01.10.2019
'Poisoned arrowhead' used by warring bacteria could lead to new antibiotics
’Poisoned arrowhead’ used by warring bacteria could lead to new antibiotics
A weapon bacteria use to vanquish their competitors could be copied to create new forms of antibiotics, according to Imperial College London research. Researchers have uncovered a novel weapon in the arsenal of bacteria that works in a similar way to common antibiotics. By further understanding and characterizing the molecular targets of VgrG2b, and how the toxin works, this research would support the design of new antibiotics.

Pharmacology - Health - 30.09.2019
Microneedle biosensors accurately detect patient antibiotic levels in real-time
Microneedle biosensors accurately detect patient antibiotic levels in real-time
Scientists have successfully used microneedle biosensors to accurately detect changes in antibiotic levels in the body, for the first time. Small, non-invasive patches worn on the skin can accurately detect the levels of medication in a patient's system, matching the accuracy of current clinical methods.

Pharmacology - Health - 30.09.2019
Fruit flies live longer with combination drug treatment
Fruit flies live longer with combination drug treatment
A triple drug combination has been used to extend the lifespan of fruit flies by 48% in a new study led by UCL and the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing. The three drugs are all already in use as medical treatments: lithium as a mood stabiliser, trametinib as a cancer treatment and rapamycin as an immune system regulator.

Health - Pharmacology - 25.09.2019
Powerful new synthetic vaccines to combat epidemics
Powerful new synthetic vaccines to combat epidemics
A new type of vaccine that can be stored at warmer temperatures, removing the need for refrigeration, has been developed for mosquito-borne virus Chikungunya in a major advance in vaccine technology. The findings, published in Science Advances today [Wednesday 25 September], reveal exceptionally promising results for the Chikungunya vaccine candidate, which has been engineered using a synthetic protein scaffold that could revolutionise the way vaccines are designed, produced and stored.

Pharmacology - Health - 24.09.2019
Anti-malarial drug can make cancer chemotherapy more effective
Scientists at the University of Birmingham have found an anti-malarial drug was effective in treating head and neck cancer in mice. The drug quinacrine was used extensively to prevent and treat malaria in soldiers fighting in mosquito-ridden areas during World War Two. It is similar to the quinine that makes tonic water glow, has minimal side-effects, and is now used for treating parasite infections and other conditions.

Health - Pharmacology - 24.09.2019
Gum disease linked with higher risk of hypertension
Gum disease linked with higher risk of hypertension
People with gum disease (periodontitis) have a greater likelihood of high blood pressure (hypertension), according to a new UCL-led study. The meta-analysis of previous findings was published today in  Cardiovascular Research , a journal of the European Society of Cardiology. "We observed a linear association - the more severe periodontitis is, the higher the probability of hypertension," said senior author Professor Francesco D'Aiuto (UCL Eastman Dental Institute).

Health - Pharmacology - 23.09.2019
Heart damage from cancer drugs linked to faulty genes
Heart damage from cancer drugs linked to faulty genes
Scientists have unveiled clues into why some cancer patients develop a serious heart condition after chemotherapy. The new research, from a team of international scientists led by Imperial College London , Royal Brompton Hospital and the MRC London Institute of Medical Sciences , shows the heart condition may be linked to a faulty gene called titin.

Pharmacology - 20.09.2019
Antidepressants may reduce anxiety more than depressive symptoms
One of the most common antidepressants, sertraline, leads to an early reduction in anxiety symptoms, commonly found in depression, several weeks before any improvement in depressive symptoms, a UCL-led clinical trial has found. Published in The Lancet Psychiatry and funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), this is the largest-ever placebo-controlled trial of an antidepressant, which has not been funded by the pharmaceutical industry.

Pharmacology - Health - 20.09.2019
Breath-holding technique could improve outcomes for radiotherapy patients
A technique that will enable cancer patients to hold their breath during prolonged bouts of radiotherapy treatment has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham. In the study, published in Radiotherapy and Oncology , researchers demonstrated that, by safely increasing oxygen levels in the lungs and removing carbon dioxide from blood, it is possible for individuals to hold their breath for multiple four-minute periods during treatment.

Health - Pharmacology - 17.09.2019
How animal research is helping fight antibiotic resistance
How animal research is helping fight antibiotic resistance
We explore how animal research is playing a vital role in the battle against antibiotic resistant superbugs. People do not expect to die from a simple infection. But that might change: the world is running out of effective antibiotics. For decades, diseases like bacterial gastroenteritis and colitis have not been a serious health threat, thanks to antibiotics.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 17.09.2019
Brain activity intensity drives need for sleep
Brain activity intensity drives need for sleep
The intensity of brain activity during the day, notwithstanding how long we've been awake, appears to increase our need for sleep, according to a new UCL study in zebrafish. The research, published in Neuron , found a gene that responds to brain activity in order to coordinate the need for sleep. It helps shed new light on how sleep is regulated in the brain.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.09.2019
Childhood behaviour linked to taking paracetamol during pregnancy
A new study by the University of Bristol adds to evidence that links potential adverse effects of taking paracetamol during pregnancy. The research published today (Monday 16 September) in Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology examined whether there were any effects of taking paracetamol in mid-pregnancy and the behaviour of the offspring between the ages of 6 month and 11 years, with memory and IQ tested up until the age of 17.
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