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Psychology - Pedagogy - 17.09.2020
Housing wealth matters for children’s mental health
Children growing up in families with expensive homes have fewer emotional and behavioural problems, finds new research led by the UCL Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS) based at the UCL Social Research Institute. The study, published today in Child Development, is one of the first to look at the links between family wealth and children's development.

Pedagogy - 26.08.2020
Low levels of wellbeing among children in Wales
Low levels of wellbeing among children in Wales
Children in Wales have some of the lowest levels of wellbeing among children across 35 countries, a team of Cardiff University researchers has found. The team, from the Wales Institute of Social and Economic Research and Data (WISERD), surveyed over 2,600 children from across Wales about their own happiness, satisfaction and psychological wellbeing, as well as how respected they feel and their inclusion in decision-making processes.

Pedagogy - 18.08.2020
New study to consider how touchscreens affect pre-schoolers' play
New study to consider how touchscreens affect pre-schoolers’ play
A new research project will look at how touchscreens affect the way two and three year olds play and what impact this has on children's development. Leading the study is Dr Elena Hoicka , a senior lecturer in Psychology at the University of Bristol, whose research focus is on the role of creative play in early cognitive development.

Pedagogy - Career - 29.07.2020
The future of work is flexible - says new study
Lockdown has also had a disproportionately negative impact on parents, especially mothers, with a majority noting that they have been carrying out more housework and care New research from the University of Kent and the University of Birmingham has found that mass homeworking during the COVID-19 lockdown has presented significant challenges for parents, particularly mothers, but has also changed the way that many people intend to work in the future.

Pedagogy - 16.07.2020
People with learning disabilities continue to die prematurely, new report shows
People with learning disabilities in England continue to die prematurely and from treatable causes of death, the latest annual report from the Learning Disabilities Mortality Review (LeDeR) programme shows. Treatable causes of death accounted for 403 per 100,000 deaths in people with learning disabilities, compared to just 83 per 100,000 deaths in the general population, according to the University of Bristol's 2019 LeDeR Annual Report.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 08.07.2020
Kids who get on best with mum and dad top the class in maths
Kids who get on best with mum and dad top the class in maths
Children who have a harmonious relationship with their parents have the edge over their peers in maths, a new study by the University of Sussex reveals. The progress in maths made by year six pupils with the most harmonious relationships with their parents was a third higher compared to children with the least harmonious, according to the study published today by the Royal Society.

Social Sciences - Pedagogy - 02.07.2020
Greater support needed for carers of autistic children during lockdown
Families of autistic children have been greatly impacted by lockdown reveals a study by UCL, the University of East London and the University of Bedfordshire. It found that despite the relaxed legislation on lockdown measures for autistic people brought into effect in April, 86% of those surveyed still felt that the needs of autistic people and their families were not adequately planned for or addressed by officials during the pandemic.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 19.06.2020
Mums doing lion’s share of childcare and home-learning during lockdown - even when both parents work
Government and employers must take stock to ensure mothers' long-term employment prospects are not disproportionately impacted by lockdown Childcare responsibilities during lockdown are not being shared equally between working parents, psychologists at the University of Sussex have found. Inequalities between parents for childcare and domestic duties have increased during the Covid-19 period.

Pedagogy - Health - 16.06.2020
Children show increase in mental health difficulties over COVID-19 lockdown
Parents/carers of children aged 4-10 years of age reported that over a one-month period in lockdown, they saw increases in their child's emotional difficulties, such as feeling unhappy, worried, being clingy and experiencing physical symptoms associated with worry, according to early results from the Co-SPACE study, asking parents and carers about their children's mental health through the COVID-19 crisis.

Pedagogy - Health - 06.05.2020
'Terrible twos' not inevitable: with engaged parenting, happy babies can become happy toddlers
’Terrible twos’ not inevitable: with engaged parenting, happy babies can become happy toddlers
Parents should not feel pressured to make their young children undertake structured learning or achieve specific tasks, particularly during lockdown. A new study of children under the age of two has found that parents who take a more flexible approach to their child's learning can - for children who were easy babies - minimise behavioural problems during toddlerhood.

Life Sciences - Pedagogy - 27.02.2020
Learning difficulties due to poor connectivity, not specific brain regions
Learning difficulties due to poor connectivity, not specific brain regions
Different learning difficulties do not correspond to specific regions of the brain, as previously thought, say researchers at the University of Cambridge. Instead poor connectivity between 'hubs' within the brain is much more strongly related to children's difficulties. Between 14-30% of children and adolescents worldwide have learning difficulties severe enough to require additional support.

Health - Pedagogy - 29.01.2020
New book looks at the ethical dilemmas of UK intelligence
A study evaluating the effectiveness of the widely used ‘Daily Mile' intervention in schools to tackle childhood obesity has found that the benefits are small, and may be greater in girls than boys. The study concludes that whilst interventions such as The Daily Mile are not going to reduce childhood obesity alone, they could be an important part of a wider population strategy to tackling this challenge.

Pedagogy - Health - 28.01.2020
The Daily Mile? programme could help schools’ tackle childhood obesity
A study evaluating the effectiveness of the widely used 'Daily Mile' intervention in schools to tackle childhood obesity has found that the benefits are small, and may be greater in girls than boys. The study concluded that whilst interventions such as The Daily Mile are not going to reduce childhood obesity alone, they could be an important part of a wider population strategy to tackling this challenge.

Pedagogy - 27.01.2020
Ban on smoking in cars cut child exposure to cigarette smoke
A public ban on smoking in cars in England and Wales has led to fewer children being exposed to cigarette smoke, according to new analysis. England and Wales banned smoking in cars carrying children in 2015, with Scotland introducing a ban the following year. But to date, the impact of the legislation on children's exposure to cigarette smoke has been unclear.

Pedagogy - 20.01.2020
Becoming less active and gaining weight: downsides of becoming an adult
Becoming less active and gaining weight: downsides of becoming an adult
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Pedagogy - 05.12.2019
Reveals what factors influence young people’s gambling habits
A study has shown that regular weekly gamblers were more likely to be male and had developed habits and patterns of play by age 20. Factors such as the gambling habits of parents and social media use were also found to influence a young person's gambling activity. The in-depth longitudinal study by the University of Bristol's Children of the 90s was commissioned by GambleAware.

Agronomy / Food Science - Pedagogy - 26.11.2019
Schools, parents and grandparents hold key to unlocking China's obesity problem
Schools, parents and grandparents hold key to unlocking China’s obesity problem
Over 30 million Chinese children, aged between seven and 18, are overweight or obese - placing them at greater risk of an early death and this number is set to rise to 50 million by 2030, caused in part by the role grandparents play in childcare. Researchers at the Universities of Birmingham and Bristol worked with Guangzhou Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, enlisting 1,641 six-year-old children across 40 primary schools in Guangzhou to evaluate the effectiveness of the CHIRPY DRAGON programme in tackling childhood obesity.

Agronomy / Food Science - Pedagogy - 26.11.2019
Schools, parents and grandparents hold key to unlocking China’s obesity problem
Educating parents and grandparents - as well as improving physical activity and the food provided at school - could hold the key to solving China's obesity pandemic, according to one of the largest trials of childhood obesity prevention in the world. Over 30 million Chinese children, aged between seven and 18, are overweight or obese - placing them at greater risk of an early death and this number is set to rise to 50 million by 2030, caused in part by the role grandparents play in childcare.

Pedagogy - 20.11.2019
Lower income to blame for poorer attainment of children brought up by single mothers
New research examining the effect of being raised by a single mother reveals lower income and resources has the greatest impact on a child's development, not poor parenting skills. The study, published today [20 November] in the journal Child Development , found children who lived with a single mother before age 11 had lower verbal ability than children whose parents stayed together.

Career - Pedagogy - 22.10.2019
Women ‘less likely to progress at work’ than their male counterparts following childbirth
Women and men experience a 'large divergence' in their career paths in the years following childbirth, according to a study following more than 3,500 new parents. Only 27.8 per cent of women are in full-time work or self-employed three years after childbirth, compared to 90 per cent of new fathers.
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