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Computer Science / Telecom - Mathematics - 24.09.2019
Numbers limit how accurately digital computers model chaos
Numbers limit how accurately digital computers model chaos
Digital computers use numbers based on flawed representations of real numbers, which may lead to inaccuracies when simulating the motion of molecules, weather systems and fluids, find UCL and Tufts University scientists. The study, published today in Advanced Theory and Simulations , shows that digital computers cannot reliably reproduce the behaviour of 'chaotic systems' which are widespread.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 07.08.2019
Thriving animal collectives like ants should move through their environment like ‘savvy gamblers’
Many animals have to move around in their environment to find resources to live and reproduce. Scientists have studied particular examples of this for many years but there are not many unifying frameworks to understand the general organising principles of animal movement. This is especially true for animal collectives like ant colonies, whose individual routes as they search for food can look rather like a ‘random walk'.

Mathematics - 03.07.2019
Common scents don’t always make the best perfumes, suggests mathematical study
Perfumes that use the most popular scents do not always obtain the highest number of ratings, according to an analysis of online perfume reviews. A study of 10,000 perfumes and their online ratings reveals which odours are likely to bring success, with some surprising combinations providing a boost to ratings.

Mathematics - Pharmacology - 07.06.2019
New technique will help experts make heads or tails of male fertility
A new way of analysing sperm that tracks the movement of the sperm tail could enable substantial improvements to male fertility testing. The technique measures the speed and action of the sperm flagellum, or tail, which provides vital information for understanding whether sperm in an ejaculate have the potential to reach and fertilise the egg.

Mathematics - 02.05.2019
Opportunistic cancer cells ’slip through the gaps’ to spread through blood vessels
Cancer cells may rely on opportunism, as well as chemical signalling, to spread through the body, according to new findings by mathematicians at the University of Birmingham. Cancer spreads by sending cells out from the primary tumour to travel through the vascular or lymphatic system to colonise other organs in a process called metastasis.

Mathematics - 15.04.2019
Support for Conservative Party rises with UK house prices
Support for Conservative Party rises with UK house prices, new research reveals The big increase in housing wealth inequality in the UK over the period from 1995 to 2007 increased homeowners' probability of supporting the Conservative party. However, it did not make homeowners more averse to the state's ownership of public services.

Mathematics - 01.04.2019
Bristol mathematician cracks Diophantine puzzle
A mathematician from the University of Bristol has found a solution to part of a 64-year old mathematical problem - expressing the number 33 as the sum of three cubes. Since the 1950s, mathematicians have wondered if all whole numbers could be expressed as the sum of three cubes; whether the equation k = x³+ y³+ z³ always has a solution.

Mathematics - 09.01.2019
Census data could be used to improve city neighbourhoods
A new analysis of the 2011 census has revealed that social differences among city populations significantly influence how neighbourhoods take shape. Researchers hope that their insights could help councils to make better planning decisions. Dr Thilo Gross and Dr Edmund Barter in the Department of Engineering Mathematics at the University of Bristol, used a new algorithm to gain insight into city neighbourhood characteristics, starting with Bristol.

Mathematics - 07.09.2018
BBC’s book of brainteasers includes puzzles from Sussex mathematician
A senior lecturer from the University of Sussex has contributed to a book of brainteasers from BBC Radio 4's Today Programme, which published yesterday. The Today Programme Puzzle Book contains over 280 cryptic, linguistic and numerical brainteasers created by top mathematicians and logicians from around the country, including Dr Nicos Georgiou, Senior Lecturer in Mathematics at Sussex.

Mathematics - Career - 15.08.2018
Universities "must look deeper" into the drivers of inequality within research
Universities must seek a deeper understanding of the drivers of inequality in job roles and academic ranks if they are to achieve change. Professor Axel Gandy (Chair in Statistics, Imperial College London), Dr Georg Hahn (Senior Research Associate in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at Lancaster University) and Professor Nick Jennings (Vice Provost for Research at Imperial College London) have looked at possible inequalities relating to grant application success rates within Imperial over a five-year period.

Mathematics - Environment - 09.08.2018
Half of London car crashes take place in 5% of the city's junctions
Half of London car crashes take place in 5% of the city’s junctions
The location of road accidents is not random and they tend to be highly concentrated in urban areas, according to a new UCL study. The study, published in the open-access journal Plos One , found that nearly 50% of the serious and fatal accidents in London take place in 5% of road junctions.   PhD candidate Rafael Prieto Curiel, lead researcher (UCL Mathematics), said: "Despite being a rare event, road accidents are among the top ten causes of death worldwide.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 06.08.2018
Better sleep linked with family tree strength
Better sleep linked with family tree strength
The question of why we sleep has been a longstanding subject of debate, with some theories suggesting that slumber provides respite for the brain, which allows it to filter out insignificant neural connections, build new ones, strengthen memories and even repair itself. However, new Oxford University research has used mathematical approaches to tackle the adaptive significance of sleep, and suggests that it has another equally significant purpose - boosting our 'fitness' and future family line reproductive success.

Mathematics - 20.06.2018
Stubborn sparrows may have sung the same songs for hundreds of years
By preserving songs for centuries, American swamp sparrows show a cultural stability previously only seen in humans. Local populations of birds may have sung the same songs for hundreds of years and passed them on through the generations, according to researchers at Imperial College London, Queen Mary University of London and Duke University.

Health - Mathematics - 07.06.2018
Cost and scale of field trials for bovine TB vaccine may make them unfeasible
Cost and scale of field trials for bovine TB vaccine may make them unfeasible
Field trials for a vaccine to protect cattle against bovine tuberculosis (bovine TB) would need to involve 500 herds - potentially as many as 75,000-100,000 cattle - to demonstrate cost effectiveness for farmers, concludes a study published today in the journal eLife . Our results highlight the enormous scale of trials that would be necessary to evaluate BCG alongside continuing testing in the field.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 22.05.2018
Extremely fast dives help peregrine falcons manoeuvre to catch agile prey | University of Oxford
Using detailed computer simulations, Oxford University research has revealed why falcons dive at their prey using the same steering laws as man-made missiles. Published today in PLOS Computational Biology, researchers from Oxford's Department of Zoology use computer simulations of peregrine falcon attacks to show that the extreme speeds reached during dives from high altitudes enhance the raptors' ability to execute manoeuvres needed to successfully attack agile prey that would otherwise escape.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 12.04.2018
Extremely fast dives help peregrine falcons manoeuvre to catch agile prey
Using detailed computer simulations, Oxford University research has revealed why falcons dive at their prey using the same steering laws as man-made missiles. Published today in PLOS Computational Biology, researchers from Oxford's Department of Zoology use computer simulations of peregrine falcon attacks to show that the extreme speeds reached during dives from high altitudes enhance the raptors' ability to execute manoeuvres needed to successfully attack agile prey that would otherwise escape.

Physics - Mathematics - 28.03.2018
CERN experiment analysed by Lancaster physicist sees hints of one of the rarest kaon decays
CERN experiment analysed by Lancaster physicist sees hints of one of the rarest kaon decays
Scientists at Cern say their NA62 experiment has observed what may be an ultra-rare charged kaon decay. The NA62 experiment is a particle physics experiment at CERN using a 400 GeV proton beam from the SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) accelerator. The UK has played a leading role in both the detector construction for NA62 and the data analysis and production of results, with Dr Giuseppe Ruggiero from Lancaster University as the Physics Coordinator.

Health - Mathematics - 22.03.2018
Citizen science experiment predicts massive toll of flu pandemic on the UK
Citizen science experiment predicts massive toll of flu pandemic on the UK
How fast could a new flu epidemic spread? The results of the UK's largest citizen science project of its kind ever attempted, carried out by thousands of volunteers, predict that 43 million people in the UK could be infected in an influenza pandemic, and with up to 886,000 of those infected expected to be fatalities.

Mathematics - 21.11.2017
Schooling fish mainly react to one or two neighbours at a time
Schooling fish mainly react to one or two neighbours at a time
New research has shown schooling fish constantly change who they decide to pay attention to and respond to one or two neighbours at a time. The study, published in PLOS Computational Biology, developed a new method combining behavioural analyses with a computer model to map the chain of direct interactions in a school of fish.

Business / Economics - Mathematics - 10.11.2017
No-growth economy could mean fewer crashes and higher wages, study shows
No-growth economy could mean fewer crashes and higher wages, study shows
No-growth economy could mean fewer crashes and higher wages, study shows An economy based on zero growth could be more stable - experiencing fewer crashes - and bring higher wages, suggests a new University of Sussex study. Running counter to dominant economic thinking, the new research shows that economies can be stable with or without growth and are in fact likely to be less volatile if we stop chasing ever-increasing GDP.
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