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Materials Science



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Materials Science - Physics - 15.10.2019
Physicists shed new light on how liquids behave with other materials
Using a range of theoretical and simulation approaches, physicists from the University of Bristol have shown that liquids in contact with substrates can exhibit a finite number of classes of behaviour and identify the important new ones. Their findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) , challenge the accepted wisdom on wetting and drying phase behaviour.

Materials Science - Physics - 11.10.2019
White blood cell 'security guard' and community messages: News from the College
White blood cell ’security guard’ and community messages: News from the College
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From a white blood cell playing a ‘security guard' role, to the President's call for collaboration and community, here is some quick-read news from across the College. Patrolling eye Researchers from Imperial have discovered a new ‘security guard' role for a type of white blood cell called a neutrophil.

Materials Science - 02.10.2019
New 3D printing technique for biomaterials
A new way of 3D printing soft materials such as gels and collagens offers a major step forward in the manufacture of artificial medical implants. Developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham, the technique could be used to print soft biomaterials that could be used to repair defects in the body.

Health - Materials Science - 27.08.2019
New antimicrobial coating could be key in fight against hospital-acquired infections
Scientists at the University of Birmingham have created an antimicrobial coating for steel surfaces which has proven to rapidly kill bacteria that cause some of the most common hospital-acquired infections. Developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham, patented by University of Birmingham Enterprise , and to be commercialised by a new company NitroPep, the coating - also called NitroPep - has been heralded as a new tool in the fight against the spread of infection.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 12.08.2019
Supercapacitors turbocharged by laxatives
Supercapacitors turbocharged by laxatives
An international team of scientists, including a professor of chemistry from the University of Bristol, has worked out a way to improve energy storage devices called supercapacitors, by designing a new class of detergents chemically related to laxatives. Their paper, published today , explains why these detergents, called ionic liquids, are better electrolytes than current materials and can improve supercapacitors.

Materials Science - Environment - 05.08.2019
Five cool things our surface scientists do
Surface science can make a big difference to our health, well-being and environment. Our surface scientists at Durham have been working on a whole range of applications that have already changed our lives in some way (think mobile phones and puddles) and could make a real difference to people around the world, particularly in developing countries.

Innovation / Technology - Materials Science - 03.07.2019
New technique could brighten screens and make smartphone batteries last longer
Our future TV and smartphone screens could have double the energy efficiency, thanks to a technique invented by Imperial scientists. The pixels in many modern screens for TVs, smartphones, tablets, and laptops are lit by little devices called OLEDs (organic light emitting diodes). The findings could make screens of all kinds brighter, with better contrast and longer life.

Physics - Materials Science - 29.05.2019
Experts develop nanolasers on silicon
Researchers at Cardiff University have shown tiny light-emitting nanolasers less than a tenth of the size of the width of a human hair can be integrated into silicon chip design. The photonic band-edge lasers can operate at superfast speeds and have the potential to help the global electronics industry deliver a range of new applications - from optical computing to remote sensing and heat seeking, Professor Diana Huffaker is Scientific Director of Cardiff University's Institute for Compound Semiconductors , based at Cardiff University's School of Physics and Astronomy.

Materials Science - Electroengineering - 23.05.2019
Washable, wearable battery-like devices could be woven directly into clothes
Washable, wearable battery-like devices could be woven directly into clothes
Researchers have developed washable, wearable 'batteries' based on cheap, safe and environmentally friendly inks and woven directly into fabrics. The devices could be used for flexible circuits, healthcare monitoring, energy conversion, and other applications. The team, led by Dr Felice Torrisi , who recently joined Imperial from the University of Cambridge, have shown how graphene - an atom-thick sheet of carbon - and other related materials can be directly incorporated into fabrics.

Physics - Materials Science - 10.04.2019
Wonder material: individual 2D phosphorene nanoribbons made for the first time
Wonder material: individual 2D phosphorene nanoribbons made for the first time
Tiny, individual, flexible ribbons of crystalline phosphorus have been made and measured an international collaboration, in a world first, and they could revolutionise electronics and fast-charging battery technology. Since the isolation of 2-dimensional phosphorene (the phosphorus equivalent of graphene) in 2014, more than 100 theoretical studies have predicted that new and exciting and properties could emerge by producing narrow ‘ribbons' of this material.

Materials Science - Physics - 14.02.2019
Solar-powered supercapacitors could create flexible, wearable electronics
A breakthrough in energy storage technology could bring a new generation of flexible electronic devices to life, including solar-powered prosthetics for amputees. In a new paper published in the journal Advanced Science , a team of engineers from the University of Glasgow discuss how they have used layers of graphene and polyurethane to create a flexible supercapacitor which can generate power from the sun and store excess energy for later use.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 11.02.2019
What does it take to make a better battery?
What does it take to make a better battery?
Cambridge researchers are working to solve one of technology's biggest puzzles: how to build next-generation batteries that could power a green revolution. A better battery could make all the difference. So what's holding up progress? Like many of us, when I wake up I reach for the phone on my bedside table and begin scrolling through Twitter, Instagram, email and news apps.

Materials Science - Innovation / Technology - 17.01.2019
Smart fabrics made possible by new metal deposition technique
Smart fabrics made possible by new metal deposition technique
Researchers have devised a way to deposit metals onto fabrics and used it to insert sensors and batteries into these materials. A multidisciplinary team of researchers from Imperial College London led by Dr Firat Güder from the Department of Bioengineering have developed an innovative technique to print metals such as silver, gold and platinum onto natural fabrics.

Physics - Materials Science - 10.12.2018
Answering the mystery of what atoms do when liquids and gases meet
Answering the mystery of what atoms do when liquids and gases meet
How atoms arrange themselves at the smallest scale was thought to follow a 'drum-skin' rule, but mathematicians have now found a simpler solution. Atomic arrangements in different materials can provide a lot of information about the properties of materials, and what the potential is for altering what they can be used for.

Veterinary Science - Materials Science - 21.11.2018
Sugar supplement slows tumour growth and can improve cancer treatment
Mannose sugar, a nutritional supplement, can both slow tumour growth and enhance the effects of chemotherapy in mice with multiple types of cancer. This lab study is a step towards understanding how mannose could be used to help treat cancer. The results of the study today (Wednesday). Tumours use more glucose than normal, healthy tissues.

Veterinary Science - Materials Science - 20.11.2018
Modified virus used to kill cancer cells
Scientists have equipped a virus that kills carcinoma cells with a protein so it can also target and kill adjacent cells that are tricked into shielding the cancer from the immune system. It is the first time that cancer-associated fibroblasts within solid tumours - healthy cells that are tricked into protecting the cancer from the immune system and supplying it with growth factors and nutrients - have been specifically targeted in this way.

Materials Science - Mechanical Engineering - 02.11.2018
Identifies how 3D printed metals can be both strong and ductile
A new technique by which to 3D print metals, involving a widely used stainless steel, has been shown to achieve exceptional levels of both strength and ductility, when compared to counterparts from more conventional processes. The findings, published in Materials Today , outline how a joint research team from the University of Birmingham, UK, Stockholm University, Sweden and Zhejiang University, China were able to optimizing the process parameters during 3D printing to achieve the results.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 27.09.2018
Global success for University of Birmingham in latest World University Rankings
University of Birmingham scientists are paving the way to swap the lithium in lithium-ion batteries with sodium, according to research published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. Lithium-ion batteries (LIB) are rechargeable and are widely used in laptops, mobile phones and in hybrid and fully electric vehicles.

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