news

« BACK

Life Sciences



Results 1 - 20 of 5009.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 251 Next »


Health - Life Sciences - 25.07.2024 - Today
Blood proteins predict the risk of developing more than 60 diseases
Blood proteins predict the risk of developing more than 60 diseases
Proteins in the blood could predict the onset of many diverse diseases, according to a new study involving UCL researchers. The research team, who measured thousands of proteins in a drop of blood, report the ability of protein 'signatures' to predict the onset of 67 diseases including multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, motor neurone disease, pulmonary fibrosis, and dilated cardiomyopathy.

Life Sciences - 25.07.2024 - Today
Size doesn't matter for mammals with more complex brains, according to new study
Size doesn’t matter for mammals with more complex brains, according to new study
New research in Nature Communications investigates the effect of sexual size dimorphism on genome evolution. Mammals that have evolved more developed brains tend to have a smaller size difference between males and females of that species, according to new research in Nature Communications led by the University of Bath.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.07.2024
Turning off inflammatory protein extends healthy lifespan in mice
Turning off inflammatory protein extends healthy lifespan in mice
Scientists have discovered that 'turning off' a protein called IL-11 can significantly increase the healthy lifespan of mice by almost 25%. Researchers in the UK and Singapore have found that targeting the production of a key inflammatory protein in mice can extend their lifespan, reduce age-related disease and make older animals less frail.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.07.2024
Logged forests can still have ecological value - if not pushed too far
Logged forests can still have ecological value - if not pushed too far
Researchers have analysed data from 127 studies to reveal 'thresholds' for when logged rainforests lose the ability to sustain themselves. The results could widen the scope of which forests are considered 'worth' conserving, but also show how much logging degrades forests beyond the point of no return.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.07.2024
Multiple concussions in rugby players change proteins in their blood
A new study shows that retired rugby players who have suffered multiple concussions have abnormal levels of certain proteins in their blood. This may make them more prone to developing diseases such as motor neurone disease (MND). This is what new research led by our bioscientists has found as part of the UK Rugby Health project.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.07.2024
Scientists make breakthrough in fridge-free storage for vital medicines
Scientists have developed a new approach to store and distribute crucial protein therapeutics without the need for fridges or freezers. The breakthrough, published in the journal Nature , could significantly improve accessibility of essential protein-based drugs in developing countries where cold storage infrastructure may be lacking, helping efforts to diagnose and treat more people with serious health conditions.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.07.2024
First bone marrow model which supports human stem cells
Scientists develop first bone marrow model which supports human stem cells Scientists have created the first bioengineered bone marrow model which can support the type of human stem cells that are crucial for bone marrow transplants and in vitro study work. The research - published in Nature Communications and led by the University of Glasgow - replicates key aspects of the human bone marrow microenvironment, to enable the support of rare long-term hematopoietic stem cells, or LT-HSCs.

Life Sciences - Environment - 16.07.2024
Insight into one of life's earliest ancestors revealed in new study
Insight into one of life’s earliest ancestors revealed in new study
The Last Common Universal Ancestor (LUCA), from which life evolved into bacteria, plants and animals, was older and more complex than previously thought. An international team of researchers, including Dr James Clark from the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath, has shed light on Earth's earliest ecosystem, showing that within a few hundred million years of planetary formation, life on Earth was already flourishing.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.07.2024
New ways to study spinal cord malformations in embryos
New ways to study spinal cord malformations in embryos
A group of scientists at UCL have successfully created mechanical force sensors directly in the developing brains and spinal cords of chicken embryos, which they hope will improve understanding and prevention of birth malformations such as spina bifida. The study, published in Nature Materials and in collaboration with the University of Padua and the Veneto Institute of Molecular Medicine (VIMM), uses innovative biotechnologies to measure the mechanical forces exerted by the embryo during its development.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.07.2024
New discovery hope for people with neurodevelopment disorders
A global collaboration involving University of Manchester scientists has discovered the gene whose variants potentially causing neurodevelopmental disorders in hundreds of thousands of people across the world. The findings of the University of Oxford led study, published in Nature , are an exciting first step towards the development of future treatments for the disorders which have devastating impacts on learning, behaviour, speech, and movement.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.07.2024
Scientists pave way for greener cancer treatments with new enzyme discovery
Scientists pave way for greener cancer treatments with new enzyme discovery
Scientists from The University of Manchester have uncovered a more efficient and sustainable way to make peptide-based medicines, showing promising effectiveness in combating cancers. Peptides are comprised of small chains of amino acids, which are also the building blocks of proteins. Peptides play a crucial role in our bodies and are used in many medicines to fight diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and infections.

Life Sciences - 08.07.2024
Brain size riddle solved as humans exceed evolution trend
We've helped clarify centuries of controversy surrounding brain size evolution - and resolved some puzzling complexities in the relationship between brain size and body mass. Researchers from the University of Reading and the Department of Anthropology here at Durham analysed an enormous dataset of brain and body sizes from around 1,500 species.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.07.2024
Scientists map how deadly bacteria evolved to become epidemic
Scientists map how deadly bacteria evolved to become epidemic
Pseudomonas aeruginosa - an environmental bacteria that can cause devastating multidrug-resistant infections, particularly in people with underlying lung conditions - evolved rapidly and then spread globally over the last 200 years, probably driven by changes in human behaviour, a new study has found.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.07.2024
Bowel cancer turns genetic switches on and off to outwit the immune system
Bowel cancer turns genetic switches on and off to outwit the immune system
Bowel cancer cells have the ability to regulate their growth using a genetic on-off switch to maximise their chances of survival, a phenomenon that's been observed for the first time by researchers at UCL and University Medical Center Utrecht. The number of genetic mutations in a cancer cell was previously thought to be purely down to chance.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.07.2024
Discovery of cellular mechanism maintaining brain energy could help late-life health
Discovery of cellular mechanism maintaining brain energy could help late-life health
A key mechanism which detects when the brain needs an additional energy boost to support its activity has been identified in a study in mice and cells led by UCL scientists. The scientists say their findings, published in Nature , could inform new therapies to maintain brain health and longevity, as other studies have found that brain energy metabolism can become impaired late in life and contribute to cognitive decline and the development of neurodegenerative disease.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 02.07.2024
Genetic study points to oxytocin as possible treatment for obesity and postnatal depression
Scientists have identified a gene which, when missing or impaired, can cause obesity, behavioural problems and, in mothers, postnatal depression. The discovery, reported today in Cell , may have wider implications for the treatment of postnatal depression, with a study in mice suggesting that oxytocin may alleviate symptoms.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 02.07.2024
Huge study identifies suicide risk factors to improve preventions
In the largest study of its kind, scientists at the University of Warwick have investigated a range of contributing risk factors for suicide - helping to identify individuals who might benefit from interventions. The behavioural and biological predictors, include elevated white blood cells, neuroticism, childhood experiences and reduced grey matter in the brain.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.07.2024
Cutting-edge genomic test can improve care of children with cancer
Whole genome sequencing has improved clinical care of some children with cancer in England by informing individual patient care. Research published today supports the efforts to provide genome sequencing to all children with cancer and shows how it can improve the management of care in real-time, providing more benefits than all current tests combined.

Life Sciences - Veterinary - 02.07.2024
Hippos' ability to become airborne
Hippos' ability to become airborne
A new study from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) into the movement and gaits of hippopotamuses on land has found that while they almost exclusively trot, the fastest-moving hippos become airborne for substantial periods of time. This research will improve scientific understanding of how the size of large animals influences their movement on land, support the reconstruction of the evolutionary biomechanics of hippo lineages and help veterinarians diagnose or monitor hippos that have problems moving or are experiences lameness.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.07.2024
Largest ever genetic study of age of puberty in girls shows links with weight gain
Genes can indirectly influence the age at which girls have their first period by accelerating weight gain in childhood, a known risk factor for early puberty, a Cambridge-led study has found. Other genes can directly affect age of puberty, some with profound effects. Many of the genes we've found influence early puberty by first accelerating weight gain in infants and young children.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 251 Next »