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Life Sciences - Health - 19.01.2022
Harmful changes in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Harmful changes in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Harmful changes in supporting cells, called astrocytes, have been identified in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) by UCL and Francis Crick Institute researchers. The two new publications, in Brain and Genome Research , suggests that the star-shaped astrocytes may be a key target for new ALS treatments.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 19.01.2022
Manchester lab develop more sustainable and rapid route to future medicines
Manchester lab develop more sustainable and rapid route to future medicines
Researchers at The University of Manchester have developed a new powerful and sustainable method of combining enzymes found in nature with non-toxic synthetic catalysts to deliver important chemical building blocks needed for the production of pharmaceuticals as well as other valuable chemicals. New research published today describes the use of natural enzymes and earth-abundant and non-toxic transition metal-catalysts to forge organic molecules, creating what is known as an amide bond, in a more efficient and sustainable manner.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.01.2022
Link between brain cell development and risk of schizophrenia
Scientists from Cardiff University have discovered new links between the breakdown in brain cell development and the risk of schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. Genetic risk factors are known to disrupt brain development in a number of these disorders, but little is known about which aspects of this process are affected.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 13.01.2022
Promising novel treatment for Dry Eye Disease revealed by new research
Promising novel treatment for Dry Eye Disease revealed by new research
The University of Manchester, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Link Biologics Limited today announced that promising preclinical data on the treatment of Dry Eye Disease using a novel protein biological drug, Link_TSG6, have been published in the peer-reviewed journal, Ocular Surface .

Life Sciences - Health - 13.01.2022
Mosquitoes’ mating game discovery provides new clues to combat malaria
Male mosquitoes beat their wings faster when swarming at sunset to better detect females and increase their chance of reproducing, finds a novel study led by UCL scientists. Published in  Science Advances , the findings provide a vital new insight into how mosquitoes, driven by their internal circadian clock, combine changes in wing beats with their acute auditory senses to successfully mate.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 10.01.2022
Jurassic Giant - The Largest Marine Reptile Skeleton Ever Unearthed in Britain
Jurassic Giant - The Largest Marine Reptile Skeleton Ever Unearthed in Britain
The fossilised remains of Britain's largest ichthyosaur, colloquially known as a 'Sea Dragon', have been discovered at the Rutland Water Nature Reserve, owned and run by Anglian Water. It is the biggest and most complete skeleton of its kind found to date in the UK and is also thought to be the first ichthyosaur of its species found in the country.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.12.2021
'Battle of the sexes' begins in womb as father and mother's genes tussle over nutrition
’Battle of the sexes’ begins in womb as father and mother’s genes tussle over nutrition
Cambridge scientists have identified a key signal that the fetus uses to control its supply of nutrients from the placenta in a tug-of-war between genes inherited from the father and from the mother. The study, carried out in mice, could help explain why some babies grow poorly in the womb. The father's gene drives the fetus's demands for larger blood vessels and more nutrients, while the mother's gene in the placenta tries to control how much nourishment she provides Miguel Constância As the fetus grows, it needs to communicate its increasing needs for food to the mother.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.12.2021
Clues to treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder found in recently evolved region of the 'dark genome'
Clues to treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder found in recently evolved region of the ’dark genome’
Scientists investigating the DNA outside our genes - the 'dark genome' - have discovered recently evolved regions that code for proteins associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This opens up huge potential for new druggable targets. It's really exciting because nobody has ever looked beyond the genes for clues to understanding and treating these conditions before.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.12.2021
Dominant Alpha variant evolved to evade our innate immune system
Dominant Alpha variant evolved to evade our innate immune system
The SARS-CoV-2 Alpha (B.1.1.7) variant mutated to evade our 'innate immune system', helping establish it as the world's first 'Variant of Concern', finds a new study led by researchers at UCL and the Quantitative Biosciences Institute, University of California San Francisco. Published in  Nature , the study shows the Alpha variant, first identified in the UK, evolved to make more of its 'antagonism proteins' that nullify the body's first line of defence, known as the 'innate immune system'.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.12.2021
New graphene-based neural probes improve detection of epileptic brain signals
New graphene-based neural probes improve detection of epileptic brain signals
New research published today has demonstrated that tiny graphene neural probes can be used safely to greatly improve our understanding of the causes of epilepsy. The graphene depth neural probe (gDNP) consists of a millimetre-long linear array of micro-transistors imbedded in a micrometre-thin polymeric flexible substrate.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.12.2021
New grafting technique could combat the disease threatening Cavendish bananas
New grafting technique could combat the disease threatening Cavendish bananas
Scientists have found a novel way to combine two species of grass-like plant including banana, rice and wheat, using embryonic tissue from their seeds. The technique allows beneficial characteristics, such as disease resistance or stress tolerance, to be added to the plants.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 22.12.2021
Modern mammals originated after dinosaur extinction, confirms new study
Modern mammals originated after dinosaur extinction, confirms new study
The most detailed timeline of mammal evolution to date has been set out in a new study co-led by UCL researchers. The Nature paper describes a new and fast computational approach to obtain precisely dated evolutionary trees, known as 'timetrees'. The authors used the novel method to analyse a mammal genomic dataset and answer a long-standing question around whether modern placental mammal groups originated before or after the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) mass extinction, which wiped out over 70% of all species, including all dinosaurs.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 21.12.2021
Exquisitely preserved embryo found inside fossilised dinosaur egg
Exquisitely preserved embryo found inside fossilised dinosaur egg
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email A 72- to 66-million-year-old embryo found inside a fossilised dinosaur egg sheds new light on the link between the behaviour of modern birds and dinosaurs, according to a new study. The embryo, dubbed 'Baby Yingliang', was discovered in the Late Cretaceous rocks of Ganzhou, southern China and belongs to a toothless theropod dinosaur, or oviraptorosaur.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2021
Genes are switched on in the human embryo from the get-go
Genes are switched on in the human embryo from the get-go
Scientists have discovered that genes in human embryos rapidly become active after fertilisation, opening a new window onto the start of human embryonic life. Scientists have discovered that genes in human embryos rapidly become active after fertilisation, opening a new window onto the start of human embryonic life.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 17.12.2021
Sauropod dinosaurs were restricted to warmer regions of Earth
Sauropod dinosaurs were restricted to warmer regions of Earth
Giant, long-necked sauropods, thought to include the largest land animals ever, preferred to live in warmer regions on Earth, suggesting they may have had a different physiology from other dinosaurs, finds a new study led by researchers at UCL and the University of Vigo. The study, published in the journal Current Biology , investigated the enigma of why sauropod fossils are only found at lower latitudes, while fossils of other main dinosaur types seem ubiquitously present, with many located in the polar regions.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 16.12.2021
Theropod dinosaur jaws became stronger as they evolved - study
Theropod dinosaur jaws became stronger as they evolved - study
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email Theropod dinosaurs evolved more robust jaws through time allowing them to consume tougher food, a new study reveals. Researchers used digital modelling and computer simulation to uncover a common trend of jaw strengthening in theropods - expanding the rear jaw portion in all groups, as well as evolving an upturned jaw in carnivores and a downturned jaw in herbivores.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.12.2021
Researchers first to predict when bacteria may become resistant to antibiotics
Researchers first to predict when bacteria may become resistant to antibiotics
Scientists have spotted signs of 'pre-resistance' in bacteria for the first time - signs that particular bacteria are likely to become resistant to antibiotics in the future - in a new study led by UCL and Great Ormond Street Hospital researchers.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.12.2021
Protein test could lead to earlier and better diagnosis of Parkinson's
Protein test could lead to earlier and better diagnosis of Parkinson’s
Scientists at the Oxford Parkinson's Disease Centre (OPDC) have been able to use a highly-sensitive method called -synuclein real-time quaking-induced conversion (?Syn-RT-QuIC) to observe the clumping of alpha-synuclein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) taken from people with Parkinson's. The findings offer hope that a pioneering new clinical test could be developed to diagnose Parkinson's correctly in its early stages.

Life Sciences - Environment - 13.12.2021
The genetic changes caused by fishing may be linked to fish population size
Commercial fishing, particularly in reduced fish populations, may be responsible for genetic changes and affect overall population resilience if not carefully managed. A new study, led by the University of Glasgow and published in PNAS, examined how commercial fishing practices - such as trawling - impacted the genetic evolution of fish populations, both directly and through reduced fish population density, mimicking declines in stocks due to over-fishing.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.12.2021
Are scientists homing in on a cure for Parkinson's disease?
Are scientists homing in on a cure for Parkinson’s disease?
Researchers optimise a peptide known to prevent the protein error that gives rise to Parkinson's disease. A molecule that shows promise in preventing Parkinson's disease has been refined by scientists at the University of Bath and has the potential to be developed into a drug to treat the incurable neurodegenerative disease.
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