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Life Sciences - Environment - 18.10.2019
Krill’s role in global climate should inform fishing policy in Antarctica
Krill ' small crustaceans eaten by whales, seals and penguins ' play a vital role in removing carbon from the atmosphere, according to a new study. A study on how krill affect the Southern Ocean's ability to take in carbon from the atmosphere and bury it on the seafloor has revealed the small crustaceans play an outsized role in the process.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 18.10.2019
New clinical research offers possibility of future rehabilitation for patients in vegetative and minimally conscious states
Non-invasive brain stimulation is to be trialed for the first time alongside advanced brain imaging techniques in patients who are minimally conscious or in a vegetative state. The study builds on promising results from the Centre for Human Brain Health at the University of Birmingham which suggested that non-invasive brain stimulation can improve the success of rehabilitation for non-responsive patients.

Life Sciences - 18.10.2019
Region, age, and sex decide who gets arthritis-linked 'fabella' knee bone
Region, age, and sex decide who gets arthritis-linked ’fabella’ knee bone
The once-rare 'fabella' bone has made a dramatic resurgence in human knees, but who's likely to have a fabella or two - and why? Fabellae aren't formed by knee-jerk reactions to either genetics or environment alone. Dr Michael Berthaume Department of Bioengineering Led by Dr Michael Berthaume at Imperial College London, a new meta-analysis has found that the mystery knee bone is more common in older people, more often found in men than women, and in people in Asia.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.10.2019
Cell family trees tracked to discover their role in tissue scarring and liver disease
Cell family trees tracked to discover their role in tissue scarring and liver disease
Researchers have discovered that a key cell type involved in liver injury and cancer consists of two cellular families with different origins and functions. The research by academics from the Universities of Edinburgh and Bristol and funded by the Wellcome Trust and Medical Research Council, is published today [Tuesday 15 October] .

Life Sciences - Environment - 14.10.2019
Conclusive sighting of rare whale confirmed
Conclusive sighting of rare whale confirmed
The first conclusive evidence of a rare whale species - the True's beaked whale (Mesoplodon mirus) - inhabiting a region of the North East Atlantic has been confirmed by a research team involving UCL. Images taken during a wildlife photography trip in the Bay of Biscay in July 2018 have given conservationists the opportunity to study this species in exquisite new detail.

Life Sciences - Linguistics / Literature - 11.10.2019
Seven Questions with Claudia Cannavo
This week we catch up with Neuroscience PhD student Claudia, who shares with us her favourite musical in London, experience meeting fellow Neurology scientists in Paris and top spot in the city for finding inspiration to write. What are you studying, why are you interested in this subject and what do you plan to do in the future?  I am currently doing a PhD in Neuroscience researching Alzheimer's disease.

Life Sciences - 10.10.2019
Sheds new light on how the brain forms and recalls memories
Neuroscientists at the University of Birmingham have proved how different parts of the human brain work together to create and retrieve episodic memory. Models suggested that, during formation of a memory, information is routed from cortex to hippocampus whilst retrieving a memory should see this information flow in reverse.

Life Sciences - 10.10.2019
Analysis: We can stop multiple sclerosis, and this is how
Professor Alan Thompson, Dean of the UCL Faculty of Brain Sciences, writes about progress made in finding treatments for multiple sclerosis. Twenty-five years ago there were no treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS) - a neurological condition that affects more than 100,000 people living in the UK. Today the picture is very different.

Life Sciences - 10.10.2019
Huntington’s disease genetic mutations expand throughout life
The region of DNA associated with Huntington's disease has been shown to grow throughout life and contribute towards disease progression. New research, published in EBioMedicine, reveals that the DNA responsible for Huntington's disease is not stable throughout life, and that older individuals carry longer versions of the genetic mutation than younger individuals.

Life Sciences - 09.10.2019
Q&A: How skin cells from foot soles could help relieve amputees of stump injury
Q&A: How skin cells from foot soles could help relieve amputees of stump injury
Imperial scientists hope to re-engineer stump skin for more comfortable prosthetics ' using skin from the sole of the foot as a template. People who have had limbs removed often use false arms and legs, known as prosthetics , to improve mobility and independence - but 75 per cent of prosthetic-wearing amputees encounter problems like skin tears, ulceration, and blisters.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.10.2019
Fresh insights could lead to new treatments for liver disease
The fight against liver disease could be helped by the discovery of cells that cause liver scarring. Scientists have identified new sub-types of cells that, when they interact, accelerate the scarring process in diseased livers. Experts hope that by understanding more how these cells behave, new treatments can be developed more quickly for liver diseases.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.10.2019
Badger culling drives animals further afield increasing risk of TB spread
New research reveals survivors of culls cover greater areas potentially increasing the risk of TB transmission to cattle. A study led by researchers at international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) and Imperial College London has found that culling drives badgers to roam 61% further afield - helping to explain why the practice, intended to reduce bovine TB transmission, can sometimes exacerbate the problem instead.

Environment - Life Sciences - 04.10.2019
New report shows British wildlife is continuing to decline at an alarming rate
New report shows British wildlife is continuing to decline at an alarming rate
The UK's wildlife is continuing to decline, according to a new report co-authored by a University of Sussex Professor. The State of Nature 2019 report finds that, since rigorous scientific monitoring began in the 1970s, there has been a 13% decline in average abundance across wildlife studied. Butterflies and moths have been particularly hard hit with numbers of butterflies down by 17% and moths down by 25%.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 01.10.2019
'Poisoned arrowhead' used by warring bacteria could lead to new antibiotics
’Poisoned arrowhead’ used by warring bacteria could lead to new antibiotics
A weapon bacteria use to vanquish their competitors could be copied to create new forms of antibiotics, according to Imperial College London research. Researchers have uncovered a novel weapon in the arsenal of bacteria that works in a similar way to common antibiotics. By further understanding and characterizing the molecular targets of VgrG2b, and how the toxin works, this research would support the design of new antibiotics.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.09.2019
Method discovered to reactivate tumour fighting genes ’silenced’ by cancer
Scientists at UCL have developed a method to reactivate 'tumour suppressor' genes, which are switched off by cancer cells - a finding which could lead to new targeted biotherapies for cancer. In the study, published in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology , researchers at UCL Cancer Institute and the Cancer Research UK UCL Centre aimed to identify ways to block the function of a regulatory protein called PRC2 (Polycomb repressive complex 2).

Life Sciences - 27.09.2019
Older male sparrows seem to father more chicks by getting more sperm to the egg
Older male sparrows seem to father more chicks by getting more sperm to the egg
Researchers are a step closer to solving the puzzle of why older male sparrows are more successful at mating and producing chicks. Older male sparrows appear to father more chicks than their younger counterparts when their female mates are monogamously ‘attached' to another male. This, according to new Imperial College London research, appears to be because older males manage to get more sperm to female eggs, which increases the chance of fertilisation.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.09.2019
New genes identified in hearing loss, providing treatment hope
New genes identified in hearing loss, providing treatment hope
Researchers have identified 44 genes linked to age-related hearing loss, giving a much clearer understanding of how the condition develops, in a new study led by UCL and King's College London. In the study, published today in The  American Journal of Human Genetics , researchers analysed the genetic data from over 250,000 participants of the UK Biobank aged 40-69 years to see which genes were associated with people who had reported having or not having hearing problems on questionnaire.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.09.2019
Adult fly intestine could help understand intestinal regeneration
Adult fly intestine could help understand intestinal regeneration
Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) are exposed to diverse types of environmental stresses such as bacteria and toxins, but the mechanisms by which epithelial cells sense stress are not well understood. New research by the universities of Bristol, Heidelberg and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have found that Nox-ROS-ASK1-MKK3-p38 signaling in IECs integrates various stresses to facilitate intestinal regeneration.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.09.2019
Some high-cholesterol genes differ between countries
Some high-cholesterol genes differ between countries
Some of the genes that predict the risk of high cholesterol don't apply to people from Uganda the same as they do in European populations, finds a new UCL-led study. The new  Nature Communications  study adds to evidence that genetic research involved in drug development and risk prediction testing might not apply equally to non-European populations.

Life Sciences - 24.09.2019
Baby brain scan library could help push forward research
Baby brain scan library could help push forward research
Hundreds of MRI scans of babies' brains have been made available online to scientists to study how the brain develops. The batch of more than 500 images is the first large-scale data release from the Developing Human Connectome Project (dHCP) - a collaboration between King's College London, Imperial College London and the University of Oxford - and could be used by scientists to advance research.
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