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Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 12:09
Know your ally: Cooperative male dolphins can tell who's on their team
Know your ally: Cooperative male dolphins can tell who’s on their team
When it comes to friendships and rivalries, male dolphins know who the good team players are. New findings, published by University of Bristol researchers, reveal that male dolphins form a social concept of team membership based on cooperative investment in the team. The Bristol researchers, with colleagues from the University of Zurich and University of Massachusetts, used 30 years of observational data from a dolphin population in Shark Bay , Western Australia, and sound playback experiments to assess how male dolphins responded to the calls of other males from their alliance network.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.04.2021
Simple treatment during pregnancy can protect baby from memory problems in later life, study in rats suggests
Simple treatment during pregnancy can protect baby from memory problems in later life, study in rats suggests
A new study in laboratory rats has discovered a direct link between low oxygen in the womb and impaired memory function in the adult offspring. It also finds that anti-oxidant supplements during pregnancy may protect against this. This study shows that we can use preventative medicine even before birth to protect long term brain health.

Life Sciences - 19.04.2021
Stone Age bear genome reconstructed from DNA in Mexican cave
Stone Age bear genome reconstructed from DNA in Mexican cave
Scientists have reconstructed ancient DNA from soil for the first time, in an advance that will significantly enhance the study of animal, plant and microorganism evolution. Analysis of DNA found in soil could have the potential to expand the narrative about everything from the evolution of species to developments in climate change - fossils will no longer be needed.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.04.2021
Age-related diseases can be linked by genetics
Seemingly unrelated diseases that typically begin at similar ages appear to have genetic similarities, according to a new study involving UCL researchers. In a research paper published in Nature Aging , the team reports using a novel approach to provide the first data-driven classification of multiple diseases obtained using human genetic and medical data freely available from the UK Biobank.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.04.2021
Worm infections leave African women more vulnerable to STIs
Worm infections leave African women more vulnerable to STIs
Intestinal worm infections can leave women in sub-Saharan Africa more vulnerable to sexually-transmitted viral infections, a new study reveals. The rate and severity of sexually-transmitted viral infections (STI) in the region are very high, as are those of worm infections, which when caught in the intestine can change immunity in other parts of the body.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.04.2021
Half of children with inflammatory syndrome after COVID-19 have neurologic symptoms
Half of children with inflammatory syndrome after COVID-19 have neurologic symptoms
Half of young people who developed the rare but serious multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) associated with COVID-19 had neurologic symptoms or signs when they entered the hospital, according to preliminary research led by UCL academics. Those symptoms included headaches, encephalopathy and hallucinations.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.04.2021
Sex cells in parasites are doing their own thing
Sex cells in parasites are doing their own thing
Researchers at the University of Bristol have discovered how microbes responsible for human African sleeping sickness produce sex cells. In these single-celled parasites, known as trypanosomes, each reproductive cell splits off in turn from the parental germline cell, which is responsible for passing on genes.

Life Sciences - 12.04.2021
New Jurassic flying reptile reveals the oldest opposed thumb
New Jurassic flying reptile reveals the oldest opposed thumb
A new 160-million-year-old arboreal pterosaur species, dubbed 'Monkeydactyl', has the oldest true opposed thumb - a novel structure previously not known in pterosaurs. An international team of researchers from China, Brazil, UK, Denmark and Japan have described a new Jurassic pterosaur Kunpengopterus antipollicatus, which was discovered in the Tiaojishan Formation of Liaoning, China.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 12.04.2021
Unusual fossil reveals last meal of prehistoric pollinator
Unusual fossil reveals last meal of prehistoric pollinator
An amber fossil of a Cretaceous beetle has shed some light on the diet of one of the earliest pollinators of flowering plants. The animal's remains were unearthed by researchers at the University of Bristol and the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS) who were able to study its fossil faecal matter, which was composed solely of pollen.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.04.2021
Researchers call for greater awareness of unintended consequences of CRISPR gene editing
Researchers call for greater awareness of unintended consequences of CRISPR gene editing
CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing can lead to unintended mutations at the targeted section of DNA in early human embryos, researchers have revealed. This highlights the need for further research into the effects of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, especially when used to edit human DNA in laboratory research. We and others are trying to develop and refine the tools to assess these complex mutations.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 09.04.2021
Traumatic brain injuries can increase risk of stroke for up to five years, finds study
Traumatic brain injuries can increase risk of stroke for up to five years, finds study
Stroke risk for patients with traumatic brain injuries is at its highest in the four months following injury and remains significant for up to five years post-injury, finds a new systematic review led by a team at the University of Birmingham. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a global health problem affecting over 60 million people a year worldwide.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.04.2021
We don't know how most mammals will respond to climate change
We don’t know how most mammals will respond to climate change
Researchers at the University of Oxford, alongside international collaborators, have found that there is a significant knowledge gap in the risks posed by climate change to mammals. In their systematic review, published in the Journal of Animal Ecology, the scientists identify that there are significant blanks about the risks to mammals in regions most vulnerable to climate change, including boreal and tropic areas.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.04.2021
Scientists confirm bacteria's genetic 'Swiss army knife' is key driver of antibiotic resistance
Scientists confirm bacteria’s genetic ’Swiss army knife’ is key driver of antibiotic resistance
Antibiotic resistance is a huge challenge facing society globally, posing a threat not only to human health but in areas such as food security and the economy.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.04.2021
Cutting-edge Cryo-EM reveals key insight into vital DNA repair process
New research, using cutting-edge cryo-electron microscopy (CryoEM), has revealed key insights into a vital DNA repair process, which is implicated in resistance to cancer treatments. Led by the University of Glasgow and published in Nature Structural Biology, the research is based on data and models collected from the Scottish Centre for Macromolecular Imaging (SCMI) and was conducted with colleagues at the University of Dundee.

Life Sciences - 01.04.2021
Beauty and attractiveness are not universally perceived
Beauty and attractiveness are not universally perceived
Facial beauty and attractiveness are not universally perceived. Instead, according to new research, it is culture and individual preferences that shape the diverse spectrum of what we think is facially attractive. A new study, led by researchers at the University of Glasgow's Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology and published today in Current Biology, modelled individual preferences for attractive faces in two cultures, Western European and East Asian.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.03.2021
Gene therapy technique shows potential for repairing damage caused by glaucoma and dementia
Gene therapy technique shows potential for repairing damage caused by glaucoma and dementia
Scientists at the University of Cambridge have shown in animal studies that gene therapy may help repair some of the damage caused in chronic neurodegenerative conditions such as glaucoma and dementia. Their approach demonstrates the potential effectiveness of gene therapy in polygenic conditions - that is, complex conditions with no single genetic cause.

Life Sciences - Environment - 31.03.2021
African elephants only occupy a fraction of their potential range | University of Oxford
African elephants only occupy a fraction of their potential range | University of Oxford
Many wildlife species are threatened by shrinking habitat. But according to new research published today, the potential range of African elephants could be more than five times larger than its current extent. Because of human pressure over the last two millenia, African elephants have suffered dramatic population declines, and their range has shrunk to just 17 percent of what it could be, say researchers - including members of Oxford University's Department of Zoology - behind the new study in Current Biology .

Life Sciences - 31.03.2021
Analysis: Are we more closely related to starfish or insects’
Professor Max Telford and Dr Paschalia Kapli (both UCL Biosciences) discuss the difficulties of tracing the vertebrate origins of humans, and say the long held view that vertebrates are closely related to echinoderms such as starfish may be misplaced. How humans evolved from the very first animals over the last 600 million years is an endlessly fascinating question.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.03.2021
New genetic clues point to new treatments for 'silent' stroke
New genetic clues point to new treatments for ’silent’ stroke
Scientists have identified new genetic clues in people who have had small and often apparently 'silent' strokes that are difficult to treat and a major cause of vascular dementia, according to research led by the University of Cambridge and published in The Lancet Neurology . These small and often silent lacunar strokes have gone under the radar for a long time, and so we haven't been able treat patients as well as we'd like to.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 25.03.2021
Teens ignore advice, but only when they know better
Teenagers are more likely than younger children to ignore advice, but only when the advice is bad, because adolescents are better at judging their own decisions, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The researchers found that between the ages of nine and 12, young people improve their ability to make decisions independently by learning when they should or shouldn't trust their own judgements.
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