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Astronomy / Space - History / Archeology - 27.06.2024
Gravitational wave researchers cast new light on Antikythera mechanism mystery
Techniques developed to analyse the ripples in spacetime detected by one of the 21st century's most sensitive pieces of scientific equipment have helped cast new light on the function of the oldest known analogue computer. Astronomers from the University of Glasgow have used statistical modelling techniques developed to analyse gravitational waves to establish the likely number of holes in one of the broken rings of the Antikythera mechanism - an ancient artifact which was showcased in the movie Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny .

History / Archeology - 04.06.2024
Largest known prehistoric rock engravings discovered in South America
Largest known prehistoric rock engravings discovered in South America
A series of ancient South American engravings are thought to be the largest prehistoric rock art in the world, reveals a new study by an international team of archaeologists involving UCL researchers. The team co-led by researchers at Bournemouth University and Universidad de los Andes in Colombia published their results in the journal Antiquity .

History / Archeology - Environment - 03.06.2024
Crucial shift in River Nile's evolution during ancient Egypt discovered
Crucial shift in River Nile’s evolution during ancient Egypt discovered
Researchers have explored how the River Nile evolved over the past 11,500 years and how changes in its geography could have helped shape the fortunes of ancient Egyptian civilisation. Research published in Nature Geoscience reveals a major shift in the Nile around four thousand years ago, after which the floodplain in the Nile Valley around Luxor greatly expanded.

History / Archeology - Environment - 23.05.2024
A rare find in Timorese mud may rewrite the history of human settlement in Australasia
A rare find in Timorese mud may rewrite the history of human settlement in Australasia
In The Conversation, Dr Ceri Shipton (UCL Institute of Archaeology) explores his new research that has found a large wave of migration reached the island of Timor not long after 50,000 years ago. Humans arrived in Australia at least  65,000 years ago , according to archaeological evidence. These pioneers were part of an early wave of people travelling eastwards from Africa, through Eurasia, and ultimately into Australia and New Guinea.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 22.05.2024
Excavation indicates a major ancient migration to Timor Island
Excavation indicates a major ancient migration to Timor Island
New archaeological evidence indicates that humans first reached the island of Timor in large numbers, challenging scientists' understanding of how ancient people migrated from Southeast Asia to Australia, according to a new study led by a UCL researcher. The study, published in Nature Communications , dated and analysed ancient sediment, artefacts, and animal remains discovered in a large rock overhang in Laili, located in north-central Timor-Leste (East Timor).

History / Archeology - 22.05.2024
3,500-year-old Mycenaean armour was suitable for extended battle - study
3,500-year-old Mycenaean armour was suitable for extended battle - study
A 3,500-year-old suit of Mycenaean armour may have been used in battle - and not just for ceremonial purposes as previously thought - new research reveals. Researchers worked with a group of Greek military volunteers who wore a replica of the Dendra armour during extended simulations of the rigours of battle.

History / Archeology - 17.05.2024
Pagan-Christian trade networks supplied horses from overseas for the last horse sacrifices in Europe
Pagan-Christian trade networks supplied horses from overseas for the last horse sacrifices in Europe
Horses crossed the Baltic Sea in ships during the Late Viking Age and were sacrificed for funeral rituals, according to research from Cardiff University. Published in the journal Science Advances , studies on the remains of horses found at ancient burial sites in Russia and Lithuania show that they were brought overseas from Scandinavia utilising expansive trade networks connecting the Viking world with the Byzantine and Arab Empires.

Environment - History / Archeology - 14.05.2024
2023 was the hottest summer in two thousand years
Researchers have found that 2023 was the hottest summer in the Northern Hemisphere in the past two thousand years, almost four degrees warmer than the coldest summer during the same period. When you look at the long sweep of history, you can see just how dramatic recent global warming is Ulf Büntgen Although 2023 has been reported as the hottest year on record, the instrumental evidence only reaches back as far as 1850 at best, and most records are limited to certain regions.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 19.03.2024
Researchers uncover remarkable archive of ancient human brains
A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Oxford has challenged previously held views that brain preservation in the archaeological record is extremely rare. The team carried out the largest study to date of the global archaeological literature about preserved human brains to compile an archive that exceeds 20-fold the number of brains previously compiled.

Environment - History / Archeology - 01.03.2024
Seeing the wood for the trees: using hazelnuts to reconstruct ancient woodlands
Seeing the wood for the trees: using hazelnuts to reconstruct ancient woodlands
Humans in northern Europe have been snacking on hazelnuts - a key accessible source of energy -for at least 12,000 years. Now, a study led by the University of Oxford has shown that it is possible to analyse the carbon isotope values of hazelnuts found at archaeological sites to reveal what the places humans lived in millennia ago looked like.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 26.02.2024
First DNA study of ancient Eastern Arabians reveals malaria adaptation
The first DNA study of the ancient population of Eastern Arabia sheds new light on their lives People living in ancient Eastern Arabia appear to have developed resistance to malaria following the appearance of agriculture in the region around five thousand years ago, a new study reveals. DNA analysis of the remains of four individuals from Tylos-period Bahrain (300 BCE to 600 CE) - the first ancient genomes from Eastern Arabia - revealed the malaria-protective G6PD Mediterranean mutation in three samples.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 08.02.2024
Ice cores provide first documentation of rapid Antarctic ice loss in the past
Ice cores provide first documentation of rapid Antarctic ice loss in the past
Researchers from the University of Cambridge and the British Antarctic Survey have uncovered the first direct evidence that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet shrunk suddenly and dramatically at the end of the Last Ice Age, around 8,000 years ago. The evidence, contained within an ice core, shows that in one location the ice sheet thinned by 450 metres - that's more than the height of the Empire State Building - in just under 200 years.

History / Archeology - 04.01.2024
Evidence of ancient medieval feasting rituals uncovered in grounds of historic property
Evidence of ancient medieval feasting rituals uncovered in grounds of historic property
An early medieval cemetery has been discovered within the grounds of Fonmon Castle, near Barry, South Wales. Archaeologists from Cardiff University's School of History, Archaeology and Religion carried out a dig in the summer, with further radiocarbon dating and analysis revealing the full extent of their find.

History / Archeology - Physics - 19.12.2023
Mesopotamian bricks unveil the strength of Earth's ancient magnetic field
Mesopotamian bricks unveil the strength of Earth’s ancient magnetic field
Ancient bricks inscribed with the names of Mesopotamian kings have yielded important insights into a mysterious anomaly in Earth's magnetic field 3,000 years ago, according to a new study involving UCL researchers. The research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) , describes how changes in the Earth's magnetic field imprinted on iron oxide grains within ancient clay bricks, and how scientists were able to reconstruct these changes from the names of the kings inscribed on the bricks.

Environment - History / Archeology - 19.12.2023
Human activity responsible for mass bird extinctions
Humans have wiped out around 1,400 bird species - twice as many as previously thought - with major implications for the ongoing biodiversity crisis, a new study involving UCL researchers has found. Many of the world's islands were previously untouched paradises, but the arrival of people to places like Hawaii, Tonga and the Azores led to far-reaching impacts including deforestation, overhunting and the introduction of invasive species.

History / Archeology - 23.11.2023
1,400-year-old temple discovered at Suffolk royal settlement
1,400-year-old temple discovered at Suffolk royal settlement
A possibly pre-Christian temple from the time of the East Anglian Kings, some 1,400 years ago, has been found at Rendlesham, near Sutton Hoo in Suffolk, by a team of archaeologists led by UCL researchers. The discovery was made over the summer by Suffolk County Council's Rendlesham Revealed community archaeology project.

History / Archeology - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.10.2023
Our European ancestors ate seaweed and freshwater plants
Study reveals our European ancestors ate seaweed and freshwater plants Published: 17 October 2023 Researchers say they have found "definitive" archaeological evidence that seaweeds and other local freshwater plants were eaten in the Mesolithic, through the Neolithic transition to farming and into the Early Middle Ages.

History / Archeology - 11.09.2023
Archaeologists reveal largest palaeolithic cave art site in Eastern Iberia
Archaeologists reveal largest palaeolithic cave art site in Eastern Iberia
Archaeologists have discovered a major Palaeolithic cave art site, arguably the most important found on the Eastern Iberian Coast in Europe. Over a hundred ancient paintings and engravings, thought to be at least 24,000 years old, have been found in a 500 metre-long cave in 'Cova Dones' or 'Cueva Dones' - a site located in Millares near Valencia in Spain.

History / Archeology - Environment - 06.09.2023
Complete Neolithic cursus on the Isle of Arran
Complete Neolithic cursus on the Isle of Arran
Researchers discover complete Neolithic cursus on the Isle of Arran A leading team of researchers have discovered what is believed to be a complete Neolithic cursus set within a rich prehistoric landscape on the Isle of Arran, Scotland. A leading team of researchers have discovered what is believed to be a complete Neolithic cursus set within a rich prehistoric landscape on the Isle of Arran, Scotland.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 21.08.2023
Researchers extract ancient DNA from a 2,900-year-old clay brick, revealing a time capsule of plant life
University of Oxford researchers have contributed to the first successful extraction of ancient DNA from a 2,900 year-old clay brick. The analysis, published today in Nature Scientific Reports , provides a fascinating insight into the diversity of plant species cultivated at that time and place, and could open the way to similar studies on clay material from different sites and time periods.
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