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Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 16.09.2020
World's largest ever DNA sequencing of Viking skeletons reveals they weren't all Scandinavian
World’s largest ever DNA sequencing of Viking skeletons reveals they weren’t all Scandinavian
Invaders, pirates, warriors - the history books taught us that Vikings were brutal predators who travelled by sea from Scandinavia to pillage and raid their way across Europe and beyond. The results change the perception of who a Viking actually was.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 01.09.2020
Radiocarbon dating and CT scans reveal Bronze Age tradition of keeping human remains
Radiocarbon dating and CT scans reveal Bronze Age tradition of keeping human remains
Using radiocarbon dating and CT scanning to study ancient bones, researchers have uncovered for the first time a Bronze Age tradition of retaining and curating human remains as relics over several generations. While the findings, led by the University of Bristol and published in the journal Antiquity , may seem eerie or even gruesome by today's convention, they indicate a tangible way of honouring and remembering known individuals between close communities and generations some 4,500 years ago.

History / Archeology - Chemistry - 27.08.2020
Ceramic cooking pots record history of ancient food practices
Ceramic cooking pots record history of ancient food practices
Analysing three components of ceramic cooking pots - charred remains, inner surface residues and lipids absorbed within the ceramic walls - may help archaeologists uncover detailed timelines of culinary cooking practices used by ancient civilisations. The findings, from a year-long cooking experiment led by the University of California, University of Bristol and the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum in Hawaii, are published this week in the journal Scientific Reports .

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 12.08.2020
Step change in our ability to unlock secrets of the past with radiocarbon dates
Step change in our ability to unlock secrets of the past with radiocarbon dates
Radiocarbon dating, a technique widely used in archaeology and geoscience, is set to become more accurate than ever after an international team of scientists have shared much-anticipated new calibration curves based on data from ancient trees, lake and ocean sediments, cave deposits and more.

Environment - History / Archeology - 12.08.2020
Researchers unlock secrets of the past with new carbon dating standard
Radiocarbon dating is set to become more accurate than ever after an international team of scientists improved the technique for assessing the age of historical objects. The team of researchers at the Universities of Belfast, Sheffield, Bristol, Glasgow, Oxford, St Andrews and Historic England, plus international colleagues, used measurements from almost 15,000 samples from objects dating back as far as 60,000 years ago, as part of a seven-year project.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 07.07.2020
Keep calm and carry on cooking: Norman Conquest of 1066 did little to change people's eating habits
Keep calm and carry on cooking: Norman Conquest of 1066 did little to change people’s eating habits
Archaeologists from Cardiff University and the University of Sheffield have combined the latest scientific methods to offer new insights into life during the Norman Conquest of England. Until now, the story of the Conquest has primarily been told from evidence of the elite classes of the time. But little has been known about how it affected everyday people's lives.

History / Archeology - 30.06.2020
Shows iconic golden eagle was once common throughout Wales
Shows iconic golden eagle was once common throughout Wales
A new study has shown that golden and white-tailed eagles were widespread and common throughout historic Wales. Scientists looked at their historical distribution as part of their bid to bring the species, which became regionally extinct in the early-1800s, back to the Welsh countryside. During their research they gained fascinating insights by looking at archaeological, fossil and observational records - and even Welsh place names.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 18.06.2020
Discovery in UNESCO passage tomb points to Neolithic Irish dynasty
Evidence of an elite adult male conceived through a socially sanctioned incestuous relationship during the Neolithic period has been discovered in Ireland's largest passage tomb, finds a new study involving UCL and Trinity College Dublin. The remains were identified in New Grange, a 5,000 year-old passage tomb that sits within the UNESCO monumental site of Brú na Bóinne.

History / Archeology - 16.06.2020
Battlefield archaeology helps veterans with physical and mental recovery
A new report by the charity Waterloo Uncovered reveals how archaeological work on the battlefield of Waterloo is helping Veterans and Serving Military Personnel with recovery from some of the mental and physical impacts of their service.

History / Archeology - 10.06.2020
Archaeologists may have discovered London's earliest playhouse
Archaeologists may have discovered London’s earliest playhouse
The earliest playhouse in London may have been discovered at a site in Whitechapel, by a team of archaeologists from UCL. The elusive remains of what is thought to be the earliest Elizabethan playhouse, known as the Red Lion, were discovered by Archaeology South-East, part of UCL's Institute of Archaeology.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 28.05.2020
4000 Years of contact, conflict and cultural change had little genetic impact in Near East
The Near East was a crossroad for the ancient world's greatest civilizations, and invasions over centuries caused enormous changes in cultures, religions and languages. However, a new study of the DNA of ancient skeletons spanning 4,000 years has revealed that most of these changes had no lasting effect on the genetics of the local population of Beirut.

History / Archeology - 22.05.2020
Opinion: Historical films may be decaying much faster than we thought
Writing for The Conversation, PhD student Ida R. Ahmad (UCL Institute for Sustainable Heritage) explains that precious historical documents are under threat from 'vinegar syndrome', which causes film to decompose. A significant chunk of the world's history is facing an existential threat.  US government deeds ,  recordings of Indigenous Australians  and  photographs of English seaside life spanning three decades  are just some of the historical documents recorded on acetate film that are suffering irreversible damage due to what's known as vinegar syndrome.

History / Archeology - Chemistry - 13.04.2020
Molecular and isotopic evidence for milk, meat, and plants in prehistoric eastern African herder food systems
Molecular and isotopic evidence for milk, meat, and plants in prehistoric eastern African herder food systems
The development of pastoralism is known to have transformed human diets and societies in grasslands worldwide. Cattle-herding has been (and still is) the dominant way of life across the vast East African grasslands for thousands of years. This is indicated by numerous large and highly fragmentary animal bone assemblages found at archaeological sites across the region, which demonstrate the importance of cattle, sheep and goat to these ancient people.

History / Archeology - 09.04.2020
Bristol leads archaeologists on 5,000-year-old egg hunt
Bristol leads archaeologists on 5,000-year-old egg hunt
Long before Fabergé, ornate ostrich eggs were highly prized by the elites of Mediterranean civilisations during the Bronze and Iron Ages, but to date little has been known about the complex supply chain behind these luxury goods. Examining ostrich eggs from the British Museum's collection, the team, led by Bristol's Dr Tamar Hodos , were able to reveal secrets about their origin and how and where they were made.

History / Archeology - Physics - 08.04.2020
Revolutionary new method for dating pottery sheds new light on prehistoric past
Revolutionary new method for dating pottery sheds new light on prehistoric past
The exciting new method Europe and Africa. Archaeological pottery has been used to date archaeological sites for more than a century, and from the Roman period onwards can offer quite precise dating. But further back in time, for example at the prehistoric sites of the earliest Neolithic farmers, accurate dating becomes more difficult because the kinds of pottery are often less distinctive and there are no coins or historical records to give context.

History / Archeology - Politics - 16.03.2020
Five things to ’dig’ about heritage at Durham
Our researchers are the history detectives, unearthing exciting things from our past and helping us learn from our ancestors. We are also the home to important cultural archives available for study. Here's From finding long a lost medieval chapel fit for a king, to discovering documents from our royal past.

History / Archeology - 29.01.2020
Iron Age ’warrior’ burial uncovered in West Sussex
A richly-furnished grave belonging to an Iron Age 'warrior' buried 2,000 years ago has been uncovered in West Sussex by UCL archaeologists. Iron weapons had been placed inside the grave, including a sword in a highly-decorated scabbard and a spear.   The burial was discovered during an excavation commissioned by Linden Homes, who are developing a site on the outskirts of Walberton, near Chichester, to create 175 new homes.

History / Archeology - Materials Science - 19.12.2019
New archaeological discoveries reveal birch bark tar was used in medieval England
New archaeological discoveries reveal birch bark tar was used in medieval England
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the British Museum, in collaboration with Oxford Archaeology East and Canterbury Archaeological Trust, have, for the first time, identified the use of birch bark tar in medieval England - the use of which was previously thought to be limited to prehistory.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 02.12.2019
1940s blood samples reveal historical spread of malaria
DNA from 75-year old eradicated European malaria parasites uncovers the historical spread of one of the two most common forms of the disease, Plasmodium vivax, from Europe to the Americas during the colonial period, finds a new study co-led by UCL. The research published in Molecular Biology and Evolution reports the genome sequence of a malaria parasite sourced from blood-stained medical microscope slides used in 1944 in Spain, one of the last footholds of malaria in Europe.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 05.11.2019
3,000-year-old Egyptian wheat genome sequenced for first time
3,000-year-old Egyptian wheat genome sequenced for first time
The genome of an ancient Egyptian wheat has been sequenced for the first time by a UCL-led team, revealing historical patterns of crop movement and domestication. The study was carried out by an international research team, which mapped the genetic code from a sample of wheat harvested over 3,000 years ago, that was excavated in 1924 from the Hememiah North Spur site in Egypt.
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