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Earth Sciences - Environment - 30.06.2020
Reveals how water in deep Earth triggers earthquakes and volcanic activity
Reveals how water in deep Earth triggers earthquakes and volcanic activity
Scientists have for the first time linked the deep Earth's water cycle to earthquakes and volcanic activity. Water, sulphur and carbon dioxide, which are cycled through the deep Earth, play a key role in the evolution of our planet - including in the formation of continents, the emergence of life, the concentration of mineral resources, and the distribution of volcanoes and earthquakes.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 29.06.2020
Asteroid impact, not volcanoes, made the Earth uninhabitable for dinosaurs
Asteroid impact, not volcanoes, made the Earth uninhabitable for dinosaurs
Modelling of the Chicxulub asteroid impact 66 million years ago shows it created a world largely unsuitable for dinosaurs to live in. The asteroid, which struck the Earth off the coast of Mexico at the end of the Cretaceous era 66 million years ago, has long been believed to be the cause of the demise of all dinosaur species except those that became birds.

Environment - 29.06.2020
Soft coral garden discovered in Greenland’s deep sea
A deep-sea soft coral garden habitat has been discovered in Greenlandic waters by scientists from UCL, ZSL and Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, using an innovative and low-cost deep-sea video camera built and deployed by the team. The soft coral garden, presented in a new Frontiers in Marine Science paper, is the first habitat of this kind to have been identified and assessed in west Greenland waters.

Life Sciences - Environment - 26.06.2020
Shelling out for dinner: dolphins learn foraging skills from peers
Shelling out for dinner: dolphins learn foraging skills from peers
A new study demonstrates for the first time that dolphins can learn foraging techniques outside the mother-calf bond - showing that they have a similar cultural nature to great apes. The findings, led by an international research team including academics at the University of Bristol, are published in Current Biology.

Life Sciences - Environment - 25.06.2020
Scientists develop model that reproduces photosynthesis
An international team, led by the University of California (Riverside) in collaboration with scientists from the Universities of Glasgow and Amsterdam, has constructed a model that reproduces a currently unrecognized general feature of photosynthesis, that can be observed across many types of photosynthetic organisms.

Health - Environment - 25.06.2020
Air pollution could help London transport planners fight COVID-19
Measuring air quality across London could help fight COVID-19 by providing a rapid means of deciding whether to reduce public transport movement - given strong links between exposure to air pollution and COVID-19 transmission, a new study reveals. Analysis of air pollution, COVID-19 cases and fatality rates in London demonstrates a connection between increased levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and particulate matter (PM2.5) and higher risk of viral transmission.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 24.06.2020
Reveals how water in the deep Earth triggers earthquakes and tsunamis
Reveals how water in the deep Earth triggers earthquakes and tsunamis
Water (H2O) and other volatiles (e.g. CO2 and sulphur) that are cycled through the deep Earth have played a key role in the evolution of our planet, including in the formation of continents, the onset of life, the concentration of mineral resources, and the distribution of volcanoes and earthquakes.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 16.06.2020
Solar Orbiter makes first close approach to the Sun
ESA's Sun-exploring mission Solar Orbiter, which carries instruments proposed, designed and built at UCL, has made its first close approach to the Sun on June 15, getting as close as 77 million km to the star's surface, about half the distance between the Sun and Earth. In the week following this first perihelion, the point in the orbit closest to the Sun, the mission scientists will test the spacecraft's ten science instruments to prove that Solar Orbiter's telescopes are ready for future scientific observations.

Environment - Life Sciences - 10.06.2020
Extinct camelids reveal insights about North America's ancient savannas
Extinct camelids reveal insights about North America’s ancient savannas
Although savanna habitats (treed grasslands) are only found in the tropics today, around 18 million years ago, during the Miocene epoch, savanna ecosystems, similar to those of modern Africa, existed in the mid latitudes of North America. At their peak - around 12 million years ago - they were comparable in their mammalian diversity to that of the Serengeti today.

Life Sciences - Environment - 09.06.2020
Analysis: Invasive species threaten most protected areas across the world - new study
New research conducted by Professor Tim Blackburn (UCL Biosciences) and the Chinese Academy of Science have found that in many of the world's protected areas, non-native 'invasive species' were living close by. The human population is growing rapidly and making increasing demands on the planet for food, water and natural resources.

Life Sciences - Environment - 08.06.2020
Protected areas worldwide at risk of invasive species
Protected areas across the globe are effectively keeping invasive animals at bay, but the large majority of them are at risk of invasions, finds a China-UK research team involving UCL. The research, led by the Chinese Academy of Science and published , show that for most protected areas, there is an invasive animal species living less than 10km away that is well suited to the protected area's environment.

Life Sciences - Environment - 03.06.2020
Urban red foxes are diverging from their country cousins
Urban red foxes are diverging from their country cousins
Urban red foxes are becoming more similar to domesticated dogs as they adapt to their city environment, according to a new analysis. Credit Sean Page A team led by Dr Kevin Parsons, of the University of Glasgow's Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, has carried out an analysis into the differences between urban and rural red foxes in the UK.

Environment - Life Sciences - 29.05.2020
Global environmental changes are leading to shorter, younger trees - new study
Ongoing environmental changes are transforming forests worldwide, resulting in shorter and younger trees with broad impacts on global ecosystems, scientists say. In a global study published in the 29 May 2020 , researchers including experts at the University of Birmingham, showed how rising temperatures and carbon dioxide have been altering the world's forests.

Environment - 28.05.2020
Antarctic ice sheets capable of retreating up to 50 metres per day
Antarctic ice sheets capable of retreating up to 50 metres per day
The ice shelves surrounding the Antarctic coastline retreated at speeds of up to 50 metres per day at the end of the last Ice Age, far more rapid than the satellite-derived retreat rates observed today, new research has found.

Life Sciences - Environment - 28.05.2020
50 billion years of evolutionary history threatened by human activity
50 billion years of evolutionary history threatened by human activity
Unique animals with long evolutionary histories are under increased threat of extinction around the world, according to a new study. Our analyses reveal the incomprehensible scale of the losses we face if we don't work harder to save global biodiversity. Rikki Gumbs Many of these unique species live in areas that are facing unprecedented levels of human pressure from activities such as urban development, deforestation and road building, including the Caribbean, the Western Ghats of India, and large parts of Southeast Asia.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 26.05.2020
Astronomers create cloud atlas for hot, Jupiter-like exoplanets
Astronomers create cloud atlas for hot, Jupiter-like exoplanets
Giant planets in our solar system and circling other stars have exotic clouds unlike anything on Earth, and the gas giants orbiting close to their stars - so called hot Jupiters - boast the most extreme. A team of astronomers from the United States, Canada and the Universities of Bristol and Oxford in the UK have now come up with a model that predicts which of the many types of proposed clouds, from sapphire to smoggy methane haze, to expect on hot Jupiters of different temperatures, up to thousands of degrees Kelvin.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 26.05.2020
Dinosaur-dooming asteroid struck Earth at 'deadliest possible' angle
Dinosaur-dooming asteroid struck Earth at ’deadliest possible’ angle
New simulations from Imperial College London have revealed the asteroid that doomed the dinosaurs struck Earth at the -deadliest possible- angle. The simulations show that the asteroid hit Earth at an angle of about 60 degrees , which maximised the amount of climate-changing gases thrust into the upper atmosphere.

Environment - Life Sciences - 22.05.2020
First evidence of microplastics passing from insects to predators in rivers
First evidence of microplastics passing from insects to predators in rivers
A species of river bird is swallowing hundreds of plastic fibres every day via their insect prey, research by Cardiff University and the Greenpeace Research Laboratories at the University of Exeter has shown. Dippers are also inadvertently feeding thousands of plastic fibres contained in insects to their nest-bound chicks during their development.

Environment - 21.05.2020
World can likely capture and store enough carbon dioxide to meet climate targets
World can likely capture and store enough carbon dioxide to meet climate targets
The world is currently on track to fulfil scenarios on diverting atmospheric CO2 to underground reservoirs, according to a new study by Imperial. The capture and storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) underground is one of the key components of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 's (IPCC) reports keeping global warming to less than 2°C above pre-industrial levels by 2100.

Life Sciences - Environment - 18.05.2020
Big-brained minnows of tomorrow could face cognitive challenges in warmer waters
Climate change could leave freshwater fish with bigger brains but a reduced ability to effectively explore their surroundings, scientists have found. In order to survive, the world's aquatic life will need to adapt to the warmer waters which global heating will produce in the coming decades. New research by University of Glasgow biologists suggests that the physiological changes fish will undergo in warmer rivers might require them to trade brains for brawn, with potentially challenging consequences.
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