news

« BACK

Environment



Results 1 - 20 of 1239.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 62 Next »


Life Sciences - Environment - 03.03.2021
Attenborough series reveals University research into how animals see the world
Attenborough series reveals University research into how animals see the world
A wildlife series narrated by Sir David Attenborough is beaming research by several University of Bristol academics into living rooms around the world. Attenborough's Life in Colour is airing on the BBC and was produced by Bristol-based TV production company Humble Bee Films. Over the series, Sir David unearths how colour, and how creatures perceive that colour, dictates the undulations of the animal kingdom.

Life Sciences - Environment - 03.03.2021
Strongest evidence yet of ’migration gene’
A team from the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Cardiff University say they have found the strongest evidence yet of a “migration gene? in birds. The team identified a single gene associated with migration in peregrine falcons by tracking them via satellite technology and combining this with genome sequencing.

Environment - Paleontology - 26.02.2021
Pioneering prehistoric landscape reconstruction reveals early dinosaurs lived on tropical islands
Pioneering prehistoric landscape reconstruction reveals early dinosaurs lived on tropical islands
A new study using leading edge technology has shed surprising light on the ancient habitat where some of the first dinosaurs roamed in the UK around 200 million years ago. The research, led by the University of Bristol, examined hundreds of pieces of old and new data including historic literature vividly describing the landscape as a “landscape of limestone islands like the Florida Everglades?

Environment - 25.02.2021
Forests' long-term capacity to store carbon is dropping in regions with extreme annual fires
Forests’ long-term capacity to store carbon is dropping in regions with extreme annual fires
Researchers have analysed decades' worth of data on the impact of repeated fires on ecosystems across the world. Their results, published today in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution , show that repeated fires are driving long-term changes to tree communities and reducing their population sizes.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 25.02.2021
Earth’s Gulf Stream System at its weakest in over a millennium 
A new study involving researchers from UCL has found consistent evidence of a decline in ocean currents, with the Gulf Stream System, also known as the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), at its weakest in over 1,000 years.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 23.02.2021
Glaciers accelerate in the Getz region of West Antarctica
Glaciers accelerate in the Getz region of West Antarctica
Glaciers in West Antarctica are moving more quickly from land into the ocean, contributing to rising global sea levels. A 25-year record of satellite observations has been used to show widespread increases in ice speed across the Getz sector for the first time, with some ice accelerating into the ocean by nearly 50%.

Environment - Health - 22.02.2021
Banning wild meat could add to global food problems
Banning wild meat could add to global food problems
A blanket ban on the trade of wild meat could create risks for nature and for human health, according to a new study. Governments and the World Health Organization (WHO) are under pressure from wildlife protection and animal welfare campaigners to ban hunting of all wild animals for food, and end trade in wildlife.

Environment - 22.02.2021
Gardens are secret powerhouse for pollinators
Gardens are secret powerhouse for pollinators
Home gardens are by far the biggest source of food for pollinating insects, including bees and wasps, in cities and towns, according to new research. The study, led by the University of Bristol and published today in the Journal of Ecology , measured for the first time how much nectar is produced in urban areas and discovered residential gardens accounted for the vast majority - some 85 per cent on average.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 19.02.2021
New African groundwater maps reveal widespread resilience to climate change
New African groundwater maps reveal widespread resilience to climate change
Reserves of groundwater in much of the populated parts of Africa are being replenished at rates that could help to protect communities against the damaging effects of climate change, finds a new study co-authored by UCL. Published in the journal Environmental Research Letters , the study has revealed that the long-term groundwater recharge (the rate at which groundwater is replenished) in Africa is approximately 15,000 cubic km per decade - enough to sustain widespread groundwater pumping for drinking water and irrigatation for farming.

Environment - 16.02.2021
New research shines light on future directions for cities on sustainability and climate action
What's in a word? 'Smart', 'eco' or 'future' cities? Around the world, numerous city initiatives have sprung up in recent years to signal their engagement with sustainable development and global climate change action.

Mechanical Engineering - Environment - 11.02.2021
Common pipistrelle bats are attracted to wind turbines
Common pipistrelle bats are attracted to wind turbines
Fatal attraction: Research finds common pipistrelle bats are attracted to wind turbines One of the most abundant bats in Europe may be attracted to wind turbines, according to a new study from the University of Sussex and the University of Exeter. The activity of common pipistrelle bats was monitored at 23 British wind farms and similar "control" locations close by without turbines.

Environment - 10.02.2021
Ozone-depleting gas emissions back on the decline
Ozone-depleting gas emissions back on the decline
The emissions of a banned ozone-depleting gas have dropped rapidly following a previously unexpected spike. A team of international researchers analysed global air measurements of the ozone-depleting chemical chlorofluorocarbon CFC-11. The analysis involved the use of detailed atmospheric models to remove the effects of natural meteorological variations.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 10.02.2021
Emissions of banned ozone-depleting substance are back on the decline
Emissions of banned ozone-depleting substance are back on the decline
Global emissions of a potent substance notorious for depleting the Earth's ozone layer - the protective barrier which absorbs the Sun's harmful UV rays - have fallen rapidly and are now back on the decline, according to new research. Two international studies show emissions of CFC-11, one of the many chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) chemicals once widely used in refrigerators and insulating foams, are back on the decline less than two years after the exposure of their shock resurgence in the wake of suspected rogue production.

Physics - Environment - 10.02.2021
New research will disrupt solar and expedite efforts toward Net-Zero target
New research will disrupt solar and expedite efforts toward Net-Zero target
A team of researchers, led by chemists from the University of Bristol, has received significant funding from the UKRI to revolutionise the fabrication and application of photovoltaic devices, used to produce solar energy. Imagine a city in the near future where buildings have solar panels integrated into windows, cladding and rooftops - allowing urban areas to generate their own clean and renewable energy.

Environment - Health - 09.02.2021
Fossil fuel air pollution responsible for 1 in 5 deaths worldwide
An estimated 1 in 5 deaths (18 to 21.5%) every year can be attributed to fossil fuel pollution, a figure much higher than previously thought, according to research co-authored by UCL. The study shows that more than 8 million people around the globe die each year as a result of breathing in air containing particles from burning fuels like coal, petrol and diesel, which aggravate respiratory conditions like asthma and can lead to lung cancer, coronary heart disease, strokes and early death.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.02.2021
All in the head? Brains adapt to support new species
All in the head? Brains adapt to support new species
Scientists studying forest dwelling butterflies in Central and South America have discovered that changes in the way animals perceive and process information from their environment can support the emergence of new species. The study led by the University of Bristol, and published today [9 February] in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), has implications for how new species might evolve and the underappreciated role of changes in the brain.

Life Sciences - Environment - 08.02.2021
Genes for face shape identified
Genes that determine the shape of a person's facial profile have been discovered by a UCL-led research team. The researchers identified 32 gene regions that influenced facial features such as nose, lip, jaw, and brow shape, nine of which were entirely new discoveries while the others validated genes with prior limited evidence.

Environment - Health - 05.02.2021
Climate change may have driven the emergence of SARS-CoV-2
Climate change may have driven the emergence of SARS-CoV-2
Global greenhouse gas emissions over the last century have made southern China a hotspot for bat-borne coronaviruses, by driving growth of forest habitat favoured by bats. Governments must seize the opportunity to reduce health risks from infectious diseases by taking decisive action to mitigate climate change.

Environment - Life Sciences - 04.02.2021
Healthy oceans need healthy soundscapes
Healthy oceans need healthy soundscapes
Oceans were once filled with the sounds of nature, but overfishing, climate change and human noise have fundamentally changed the natural underwater "soundtrack", researchers say. A global team of scientists, including six experts from three UK institutions, has documented how ocean soundscapes have changed, explored all impacts of noise on marine animals and ecosystems, and identified ways to restore a more natural soundscape.

Electroengineering - Environment - 04.02.2021
Benefits of the UK's first affordable energy positive house are confirmed
Benefits of the UK’s first affordable energy positive house are confirmed
Savings of up to £1,000 a year on energy bills could be made by living in the UK's first affordable energy positive house, researchers have shown. The team from Cardiff University say that over the course of a year the house exports 1.3 times more electricity to the grid than it consumes, thus resulting in overall net negative carbon emissions, equating to around -179 kg per year.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 62 Next »

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |