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Physics - Chemistry - 27.07.2022
Graphene scientists capture first images of atoms 'swimming' in liquid
Graphene scientists capture first images of atoms ’swimming’ in liquid
Graphene scientists from The University of Manchester have created a novel 'nano-petri dish' using two-dimensional (2D) materials to create a new method of observing how atoms move in liquid. Publishing in the journal, Nature , the team led by researchers based at the National Graphene Institute (NGI) used stacks of 2D materials including graphene to trap liquid in order to further understand how the presence of liquid changes the behaviour of the solid.

Chemistry - Physics - 20.07.2022
Chemical production breakthrough could make £9bn industry greener and cleaner
Researchers at a Scottish university have found a greener, cleaner way to produce a common chemical relied on by multibillion-dollar industries. In a new paper published today in the journal Cell Reports Physical Science , researchers from the University of Glasgow demonstrate a new method of creating anilines - chemicals commonly used in the manufacture of products including dyes, plastics and insulation, and pharmaceuticals like paracetamol.

Chemistry - Physics - 16.06.2022
New approach topples major barrier to commercialisation of organic flow batteries
Researchers from the University of Cambridge and Harvard University have developed a method to dramatically extend the lifetime of organic aqueous flow batteries, improving the commercial viability of a technology that has the potential to safely and cheaply store energy from renewable sources such as wind and solar.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 13.06.2022
Largest chemical map of the Milky Way unveiled
Largest chemical map of the Milky Way unveiled
The European Space Agency's Gaia mission involving UCL researchers has released a new treasure trove of data about our home galaxy, including the largest chemical map ever produced and the full 3D motions of 35 million stars. Gaia is ESA's mission to create the most accurate and complete multi-dimensional map of the Milky Way.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 02.06.2022
'Fruitcake' structure observed in organic polymers
’Fruitcake’ structure observed in organic polymers
Researchers have analysed the properties of an organic polymer with potential applications in flexible electronics and uncovered variations in hardness at the nanoscale, the first time such a fine structure has been observed in this type of material. The field of organic electronics has benefited from the discovery of new semiconducting polymers with molecular backbones that are resilient to twists and bends, meaning they can transport charge even if they are flexed into different shapes.

Chemistry - Environment - 24.05.2022
Scientists make plastic more degradable under UV light
Scientists make plastic more degradable under UV light
Scientists at Bath found that incorporating sugar units into polymers makes them more degradable when exposed to UV light. Many plastics that are labelled as biodegradable are only compostable under industrial conditions, but scientists at the University of Bath have now found a way to make plastics break down using only UV light.

Chemistry - 19.05.2022
Two thirds of chemicals in food packaging not listed for use
The majority of chemicals found in materials that come into contact with food are not intentionally added during the material's manufacturing process and are not currently listed for use, a new systematic evidence map involving researchers at UCL has revealed. Published today in  Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition,  researchers found evidence for 2,881 food contact chemicals (FCCs) that may transfer into food or drinks from six types of food contact materials (FCM) groups, including plastics, paper and board, metal, multi-materials, glass and ceramic, and 'other'.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 10.05.2022
Nature-inspired self-sensing materials could lead to engineering breakthoughs
Nature-inspired self-sensing materials could lead to engineering breakthoughs
The cellular forms of natural materials are the inspiration behind a new lightweight, 3D printed smart architected material developed by an international team of engineers. The team, led by engineers from the University of Glasgow, mixed a common form of industrial plastic with carbon nanotubes to create a material which is tougher, stronger and smarter than comparable conventional materials.

Chemistry - 05.05.2022
Greener route to widely used industrial material
Scientists from Cardiff University have taken a step towards a greener, more sustainable way of creating a plastic material found in a range of items from toothbrushes and guitar strings to medical implants, construction materials and car parts. In a new paper published today , the team report a brand-new method of creating cyclohexanone oxime - a pre-cursor to the plastic material Nylon-6 which is a key construction material used in the automotive, aircraft, electronic, clothing and medical industries.

Environment - Chemistry - 14.04.2022
New way to predict pollution from cooking emissions
New way to predict pollution from cooking emissions
Organic aerosols from cooking may stay in the atmosphere for several days because of nanostructures formed by fatty acids as they are released into the air. Organic aerosols - such as those released in cooking - may stay in the atmosphere for several days because of nanostructures formed by fatty acids as they are released into the air, new research finds.

Physics - Chemistry - 08.04.2022
NGI shows rare physics with electrically tunable graphene device
NGI shows rare physics with electrically tunable graphene device
A research team led by The University of Manchester's National Graphene Institute (NGI) has developed a tunable graphene-based platform that allows for fine control over the interaction between light and matter in the terahertz (THz) spectrum, revealing rare phenomena known as exceptional points. The work - co-authored by researchers from Penn State College of Engineering in the US - is published today (8 April) in Science .

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 30.03.2022
New research aims to unlock painkilling secrets of deadly snail venom
New research aims to unlock painkilling secrets of deadly snail venom
The deadly venom of a poisonous sea snail could hold the key to developing new medicines including more effective, less addictive forms of pain relief. A team led by researchers from the University of Glasgow is setting out to learn more about the unique form of venom produced by cone snails, predatory marine animals found in warm seas and oceans throughout the word.

Health - Chemistry - 28.03.2022
New method of developing diagnostic tests could help tackle future pandemics
Software which helps speed up the process of creating new diagnostic tests could help combat future pandemics, its developers say. A team of bioengineers and chemists in Scotland and China have developed a system which suggests new reaction pathways to accelerate the design and development of new diagnostic assays.

Health - Chemistry - 21.03.2022
'holy grail' method to identify the ageing mosquitos which cause malaria
’holy grail’ method to identify the ageing mosquitos which cause malaria
Scientists develop 'holy grail' method to identify the ageing mosquitos which cause malaria Scientists at the University of Glasgow and partner institutes have developed an inexpensive, fast and simple way to identify the ageing mosquitos which transmit the deadly malaria parasite.

Environment - Chemistry - 07.03.2022
Tiny 'skyscrapers' help bacteria convert sunlight into electricity
Tiny ’skyscrapers’ help bacteria convert sunlight into electricity
Researchers have made tiny 'skyscrapers' for communities of bacteria, helping them to generate electricity from just sunlight and water. Our approach is a step towards making even more sustainable renewable energy devices for the future Jenny Zhang The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, used 3D printing to create grids of high-rise 'nano-housing' where sun-loving bacteria can grow quickly.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 28.02.2022
New, nature-inspired concepts for turning CO2 into clean fuels
New, nature-inspired concepts for turning CO2 into clean fuels
Researchers have developed an efficient concept to turn carbon dioxide into clean, sustainable fuels, without any unwanted by-products or waste. Instead of capturing and storing CO2, which is incredibly energy-intensive, we have demonstrated a new concept to capture carbon and make something useful from it in an energy-efficient way Erwin Reisner The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, have previously shown that biological catalysts, or enzymes, can produce fuels cleanly using renewable energy sources, but at low efficiency.

Chemistry - 16.02.2022
Scientists report breakthrough in transuranium actinide chemical bonding
Scientists report breakthrough in transuranium actinide chemical bonding
Scientists from The University of Manchester have managed to successfully make a transuranium complex where the central metal, here neptunium, forms a multiple bond to just one other element. Enabling study of such a bonding interaction in isolation for the first time is a key breakthrough for nuclear waste clean-up.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 08.02.2022
How easy is it to create oxygen from water on Mars?
How easy is it to create oxygen from water on Mars?
Scientists at The University of Manchester and The University of Glasgow have today provided more insight into the possibility of establishing a pathway to generate oxygen for humans to potentially call the Moon or Mars 'home' for extended periods of time. Creating a reliable source of oxygen could help humanity establish liveable habitats off-Earth in an era where space travel is more achievable than ever before.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 08.02.2022
Microgravity experiments could help future space missions source oxygen
New research on generating oxygen from water found on the surfaces of other planets could help support future long-term missions to the Moon and Mars. Researchers from the University of Glasgow and colleagues took a series of gruelling flights into microgravity to study how the different gravitational pull of other planets could affect the process of electrolysis.

Chemistry - Innovation - 02.02.2022
Novel Chemical Glucose Sensing Method based on Boronic acids and Graphene Foam
Novel Chemical Glucose Sensing Method based on Boronic acids and Graphene Foam
Researchers from Chemistry working with Integrated Graphene have developed a new glucose sensor that is cheaper and more robust than current systems. Researchers at the University of Bath working in collaboration with industrial partner, Integrated Graphene, have developed a new sensing technique based on graphene foam for the detection of glucose levels in the blood.
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