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Religions - Business / Economics - 07.01.2020
Not tonight boys; how Papal visits could leave Italian men out of luck for more than a year
A visit by the Pope can renew sufficient religious observance among Italian women to withhold sex from their partners for more than a year afterwards, a new University of Sussex study shows. Papal visits to Italian provinces lead to a subsequent decrease in abortions of up to 20% with its impact felt for up to 14 months after, new research by economists Dr Vikram Pathania and Dr Egidio Farina has revealed.

Politics - Business / Economics - 17.12.2019
Female MPs more vocal under female leadership
Female MPs are roughly 20% more vocal in parliamentary debates where the cabinet minister is female than when the responsible minister is male, finds a new study by UCL. The research, published in the British Journal of Political Science , is the first to consider whether female leadership affects the processes or outcomes of political debate.

Business / Economics - 13.12.2019
The science of couples cheating with their money
One in three people commit "financial infidelity", with potentially toxic consequences for their relationships, according to a study co-led by UCL which is thought to be the first to investigate the concept. Romantic relationships are built on trust, but partners are not always honest about their financial behaviour - they often hide spending, debt, and savings from one another.

Business / Economics - 09.12.2019
Conserve now or pay later? New study compares floodplain protection today to predicted future flood losses
A new study by scientists from The Nature Conservancy (TNC), the University of Bristol and flood analytics company Fathom, seeks to answer an important question related to flooding in the United States - pay now to protect undeveloped areas that are likely to flood in the future or allow developments to go ahead and pay for damage when it occurs.

Business / Economics - Administration - 20.11.2019
Government integrity holds key to tackling corporate corruption - study
Government leaders must set a good example to the business community if they want to eliminate corporate corruption, a new study reveals. Financial incentives and criminal punishment will not root out corrupt business practices, but a government culture of honesty, integrity and strong leadership could help to cure corruption.

Environment - Business / Economics - 18.11.2019
Climate change expert outlines humanity’s role in speeding global warming
Climate change expert Professor Sir David Hendry will explore how humanity has accelerated global warming when he delivers the annual China Institute Li Siguang lecture at the University of Birmingham on Wednesday 20th November. And his talk ‘Climate Change in the Long Run' will illustrate how climatologists, volcanologists, dendrochronologists, meteorologists, geophysicists and health scientists are working together to tackle climate change and its consequences.

Environment - Business / Economics - 07.11.2019
Capturing carbon dioxide to make useful products could become big business
Capturing carbon dioxide to make useful products could become big business
Waste carbon dioxide from burning fossil fuels could be used to make valuable products such as plastics, fuels and cement, suggests new research. If done correctly, using waste carbon dioxide (CO2) to make useful products would also help offset the costs of mitigating climate change, argue scientists in a review .

Business / Economics - 30.10.2019
New report shows complex nature of prostitution and sex work in England and Wales
A large-scale report into the nature and prevalence of prostitution in England and Wales, carried out by researchers at the University of Bristol, has been published today [30 October]. The research, commissioned and published by the Home Office, is a significant step in understanding sex work, the variety of different services and for what reasons people become involved.

Business / Economics - 30.10.2019
Women, young and old people are most risk adverse
Women, the young and older people are most risk averse when it comes to financial risk taking, according to new research from the University of Bristol and Cass Business School. The report ' Quantifying Loss Aversion: Evidence from a UK Population Survey ' identifies key characteristics about individuals which explain their attitude to risk and loss.

Business / Economics - Environment - 15.10.2019
US green economy worth $1.3 trillion per year
The US green economy is estimated to generate over $1.3 trillion in revenue per year, representing 16.5% of the global green economy, according to a new study by UCL. The green economy - broadly defined as an economy that is low carbon, resource efficient and socially inclusive - is a major source of jobs in the US, employing an estimated 9.5 million people.

Environment - Business / Economics - 11.10.2019
Financial crises cause one-step forward, two steps back when it comes to air quality
New research has shed light on the impact of financial crises on air pollution showing that, while emissions are reduced during a financial crisis, the positive impacts are unexpectedly short-lived as new patterns of pollution emerge. A study led by Dr Andreas Antoniades and Dr Alexander Antonarakis at the University of Sussex shows that the break out of a financial crisis is associated with reductions in carbon dioxide (CO2) sulphur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen dioxide (NO x ), and emissions.

Environment - Business / Economics - 05.09.2019
Five cool things about our environmental research
From decarbonising heat to food security and water sustainability, we're working to bring about improvements that will benefit nature and the well-being of the planet. Durham's research is having an impact on the environment and potentially all of our lives. In fact, it's hard to imagine a more important research focus for us than the environment given that all life depends upon it.

Business / Economics - 07.08.2019
Are wearable pet devices putting our security at risk?
Are wearable pet devices putting our security at risk?
The billion-dollar pet industry now has a growing market dedicated to wearable devices but new research from the University of Bristol has found these devices capture more data on the owners rather than their pets. Consumers have the option to track location, activity and health data of their pets but the Bristol Cyber Security Group have found these wearables do not always acknowledge the privacy implications for the humans and their data.

Business / Economics - 27.06.2019
US immigration judges make harsher decisions when they ’feel the heat’
The hotter the day the more likely US immigration judges are to make harsher decisions - a new study by the universities of Ottawa, Canada and Sussex, England can reveal. The study, published in the American Economic Journal: Applied Economics , analyses the impact of outdoor temperatures on high-stakes decisions made in 207,000 US immigration cases.

Business / Economics - 10.06.2019
Garden centres need to provide more information about bee-friendly plants
Garden centres need to provide more information about bee-friendly plants
Garden centres need to provide more information about bee-friendly plants, according to new research Garden centres in the south east need to provide more information about pollinator-friendly plants, according to new research from the University of Sussex. In a study focused on the public attitudes and behaviours towards pollinator-friendly planting, researchers discovered that 52% of people thought garden centres didn't offer enough information despite believing that they'd be the ‘best place' to turn to for advice.

Business / Economics - 30.05.2019
Life isn't over: how best to communicate with people living with dementia
Life isn’t over: how best to communicate with people living with dementia
When Sandie Read was diagnosed with dementia at 57, she felt a mixture of fear, anxiety and depression. Fifteen years later and not only is she offering support to fellow sufferers but she's also working with researchers to improve the way people communicate and interact with those living with the condition.

Business / Economics - 16.05.2019
Most deprived communities are left behind
16 May 2019 As the UK heads towards a cashless society, experts have warned changes to infrastructure - including easy access to free ATMs - are leaving some of the most deprived communities behind. New research from the University of Bristol's Personal Finance Research Centre shows deprived neighbourhoods, often those where people are most likely to rely on cash, are rapidly witnessing the disappearance of their free cashpoints.

Business / Economics - 12.04.2019
Brexit wasn’t triggered by the old and unhappy, but by financial worries
People's feelings about their own financial situation had the greatest influence on them voting to leave the EU, according to new research which challenges the widely-held belief that it was the old and unhappy who swung the Brexit vote. Academics at the Universities of Bristol, Warwick and ETH Zurich, analysed the views of 8,000 prospective voters to determine what factors led to anti-EU sentiment.

Business / Economics - Environment - 12.04.2019
No more Hoover dams: Hydropowered countries suffer higher levels of poverty, corruption and debt
No more Hoover dams: Hydropowered countries suffer higher levels of poverty, corruption and debt
Countries relying on the world's biggest and most established source of renewable electricity have seen their poverty, corruption and debt levels rise and their economy slow at significantly greater rates than nations which use other energy resources over the last three decades, a major new study has found.

Business / Economics - Law - 12.04.2019
Knife crime: assault data can help forecast fatal stabbings
Police at a crime scene in Leyton, east London after a man in his twenties was stabbed to death in March of this year. Credit: PA. Police at a crime scene in Leyton, east London after a man in his twenties was stabbed to death in March of this year. Credit: PA. Knife crime data from a 12-month period could be used to help forecast the London neighbourhoods most likely to suffer a fatal stabbing the following year, according to latest research.
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