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Business / Economics - Environment - 15.10.2019
US green economy worth $1.3 trillion per year
The US green economy is estimated to generate over $1.3 trillion in revenue per year, representing 16.5% of the global green economy, according to a new study by UCL. The green economy - broadly defined as an economy that is low carbon, resource efficient and socially inclusive - is a major source of jobs in the US, employing an estimated 9.5 million people.

Environment - Business / Economics - 11.10.2019
Financial crises cause one-step forward, two steps back when it comes to air quality
New research has shed light on the impact of financial crises on air pollution showing that, while emissions are reduced during a financial crisis, the positive impacts are unexpectedly short-lived as new patterns of pollution emerge. A study led by Dr Andreas Antoniades and Dr Alexander Antonarakis at the University of Sussex shows that the break out of a financial crisis is associated with reductions in carbon dioxide (CO2) sulphur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen dioxide (NO x ), and emissions.

Environment - Business / Economics - 05.09.2019
Five cool things about our environmental research
From decarbonising heat to food security and water sustainability, we're working to bring about improvements that will benefit nature and the well-being of the planet. Durham's research is having an impact on the environment and potentially all of our lives. In fact, it's hard to imagine a more important research focus for us than the environment given that all life depends upon it.

Business / Economics - 07.08.2019
Are wearable pet devices putting our security at risk?
Are wearable pet devices putting our security at risk?
The billion-dollar pet industry now has a growing market dedicated to wearable devices but new research from the University of Bristol has found these devices capture more data on the owners rather than their pets. Consumers have the option to track location, activity and health data of their pets but the Bristol Cyber Security Group have found these wearables do not always acknowledge the privacy implications for the humans and their data.

Business / Economics - 27.06.2019
US immigration judges make harsher decisions when they ’feel the heat’
The hotter the day the more likely US immigration judges are to make harsher decisions - a new study by the universities of Ottawa, Canada and Sussex, England can reveal. The study, published in the American Economic Journal: Applied Economics , analyses the impact of outdoor temperatures on high-stakes decisions made in 207,000 US immigration cases.

Business / Economics - 10.06.2019
Garden centres need to provide more information about bee-friendly plants
Garden centres need to provide more information about bee-friendly plants
Garden centres need to provide more information about bee-friendly plants, according to new research Garden centres in the south east need to provide more information about pollinator-friendly plants, according to new research from the University of Sussex. In a study focused on the public attitudes and behaviours towards pollinator-friendly planting, researchers discovered that 52% of people thought garden centres didn't offer enough information despite believing that they'd be the ‘best place' to turn to for advice.

Business / Economics - 30.05.2019
Life isn't over: how best to communicate with people living with dementia
Life isn’t over: how best to communicate with people living with dementia
When Sandie Read was diagnosed with dementia at 57, she felt a mixture of fear, anxiety and depression. Fifteen years later and not only is she offering support to fellow sufferers but she's also working with researchers to improve the way people communicate and interact with those living with the condition.

Business / Economics - 16.05.2019
Most deprived communities are left behind
16 May 2019 As the UK heads towards a cashless society, experts have warned changes to infrastructure - including easy access to free ATMs - are leaving some of the most deprived communities behind. New research from the University of Bristol's Personal Finance Research Centre shows deprived neighbourhoods, often those where people are most likely to rely on cash, are rapidly witnessing the disappearance of their free cashpoints.

Business / Economics - 12.04.2019
Brexit wasn’t triggered by the old and unhappy, but by financial worries
People's feelings about their own financial situation had the greatest influence on them voting to leave the EU, according to new research which challenges the widely-held belief that it was the old and unhappy who swung the Brexit vote. Academics at the Universities of Bristol, Warwick and ETH Zurich, analysed the views of 8,000 prospective voters to determine what factors led to anti-EU sentiment.

Business / Economics - Environment - 12.04.2019
No more Hoover dams: Hydropowered countries suffer higher levels of poverty, corruption and debt
No more Hoover dams: Hydropowered countries suffer higher levels of poverty, corruption and debt
Countries relying on the world's biggest and most established source of renewable electricity have seen their poverty, corruption and debt levels rise and their economy slow at significantly greater rates than nations which use other energy resources over the last three decades, a major new study has found.

Business / Economics - Law - 12.04.2019
Knife crime: assault data can help forecast fatal stabbings
Police at a crime scene in Leyton, east London after a man in his twenties was stabbed to death in March of this year. Credit: PA. Police at a crime scene in Leyton, east London after a man in his twenties was stabbed to death in March of this year. Credit: PA. Knife crime data from a 12-month period could be used to help forecast the London neighbourhoods most likely to suffer a fatal stabbing the following year, according to latest research.

Business / Economics - 29.03.2019
Get her off my screen - female reality contestants prove unpopular with viewers
PA. 70/19 Female contestants in the reality show Big Brother are unpopular among viewers in countries across the globe, according to a new study. The findings could have important implications for the existence of gender discrimination in the entertainment industry. Women contestants proved particularly unpopular in the UK, where being female roughly doubled a housemate's probability of losing any given audience vote during the show's 18-year life-span.

Business / Economics - Agronomy / Food Science - 14.03.2019
Managers in global supply chains need to do more to tackle modern slavery
More needs to be done to tackle modern slavery in supply chains in Brazil - one of the world's biggest suppliers of beef and an important source of timber. Whilst some businesses in Brazil are already putting measures in place to tackle modern slavery in their supply chains, there is a lack of consistency in approach, action is voluntary, and initiatives are frequently limited to specific communities or locations, according to new research.

Business / Economics - 11.01.2019
Gamblers predicted Brexit before financial traders
Gamblers predicted Brexit before financial traders
Research shows how financial markets should have predicted Brexit hours before they eventually did, and that betting markets beat currency markets to the result by an hour - producing a "close to risk-free" profit-making opportunity, according to economists.   It looks like the gamblers had a better sense that Leave could win, or that it could at least go either way Tom Auld International finance markets lagged behind punters having a flutter whe

Computer Science / Telecom - Business / Economics - 14.12.2018
Cryptocurrency manipulation schemes could be found and foiled by new algorithm
Imperial scientists have created an algorithm to predict when specific cryptocoins are at risk of 'pump-and-dump' schemes. The algorithm could help market regulators predict and prevent cryptocurrency schemes that sees traders spend seven million US Dollars per month, only to find the price of their purchased currency falls as the scheme unfolds.

Business / Economics - 13.12.2018
Study calls for stricter regulation of elusive rabbit breeding industry
Rabbits are one of the most popular pets in the UK and yet little is known about where these very cute and appealing animals come from. Now a new study by researchers at the Universities of Nottingham and Winchester has shed light on this elusive industry, calling for more to be done to regulate and improve the breeding of rabbits as pets.

Health - Business / Economics - 11.12.2018
Grandfather’s high access to food increases grandson’s mortality risk
New research has revealed how a paternal grandfather's access to abundant food as a young boy causes their grandsons to have a higher risk of dying. The findings, published today , show that good access to food at the pre-pubescent age of nine to 12 means their grandsons - but not their granddaughters - die on average earlier, especially from cancer.

Business / Economics - 08.11.2018
Online labour platforms offer growing alternative to traditional offshoring
Online labour platforms that connect freelance workers and clients around the world are emerging as an alternative to traditional offshoring, according to new Oxford University research. Workers from emerging economies in particular are benefitting from these networks according to the study conducted by researchers at the Oxford Internet Institute.

Physics - Business / Economics - 07.11.2018
Depth of Vision
HORIBA Scientific has developed for QuantIC, the UK Quantum Technology Hub in Quantum Enhanced Imaging, Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting (TCSPC), electronics to support its research into real-time computational 3D imaging and Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR). This research has the potential to result in faster, better quality and lower-cost 3D imaging for applications that include autonomous vehicles, machine learning, security and surveying.

Business / Economics - 29.10.2018
Codifying impacts of cyber attack
Cyber-security researchers have   identified a total of at least 57 different ways in which cyber-attacks can have a negative impact on individuals, businesses and even nations, ranging from threats to life, causing depression, regulatory fines or disrupting daily activities. Researchers, from the  Department of Computer Science  at the University of Oxford and Kent's  School of Computing  set out to define and codify the different ways in which the various cyber-incidents being witnessed today can have   negative outcomes.
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