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Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 14.09.2020
Hints of life discovered on Venus
Hints of life discovered on Venus
A UK-led team of astronomers has discovered a rare molecule - phosphine - in the clouds of Venus, pointing to the possibility of extra-terrestrial 'aerial' life. The presence of life is the only known explanation for the amount of phosphine inferred by observations Paul Rimmer Astronomers have speculated for decades that high clouds on Venus could offer a home for microbes - floating free of the scorching surface, but tolerating very high acidity.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 14.09.2020
Hints of life on Venus
Hints of life on Venus
Synthesized false colour image of Venus, using 283-nm and 365-nm band images taken by the Venus Ultraviolet Imager (UVI). JAXA / ISAS / Akatsuki Project Team An international team of astronomers, led by Professor Jane Greaves of Cardiff University, today announced the discovery of a rare molecule - phosphine - in the clouds of Venus.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 09.09.2020
AI shows how hydrogen becomes a metal inside giant planets
Researchers have used a combination of AI and quantum mechanics to reveal how hydrogen gradually turns into a metal in giant planets. The existence of metallic hydrogen was theorised a century ago, but what we haven't known is how this process occurs Bingqing Cheng Dense metallic hydrogen - a phase of hydrogen which behaves like an electrical conductor - makes up the interior of giant planets, but it is difficult to study and poorly understood.

Astronomy / Space Science - 03.09.2020
Ripples from deep in the cosmos reveals most massive black hole detected yet
Ripples from deep in the cosmos reveals most massive black hole detected yet
The most massive gravitational-wave source yet has been detected - a binary black hole merger which produced a blast equal to the energy of eight suns, sending shockwaves through the universe. Gravitational waves are produced when an extreme cosmic event occurs somewhere in the universe and, like dropping a rock in a pond, these events ripple across the cosmos, bending and stretching the fabric of space-time itself.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 03.09.2020
Where do black-hole parents meet? LIGO/Virgo may provide answers
Astrophysicists investigating gravitational-wave data from the far reaches of the Universe believe they may have found an explanation for a curious signal detected from the collision of two black holes. The signal, named GW190412, was picked up by the LIGO / Virgo detectors, which are set up to observe gravitational waves - the ripples in space and time caused by huge astronomical objects - and use them to make new discoveries about our Universe.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 02.09.2020
A gravitational
A gravitational "bang": LIGO and Virgo discover the most massive gravitational-wave source yet
The LIGO and Virgo Collaboration, which includes scientists from the Institute for Gravitational Wave Astronomy at the University of Birmingham, have reported the discovery of a signal from what may be the most massive black hole merger yet observed in gravitational waves. The signal, labelled GW190521, was detected on May 21, 2019, with the LIGO and Virgo detectors.

Astronomy / Space Science - 02.09.2020
Zooming in on dark matter
Zooming in on dark matter
Our cosmologists have zoomed in on the smallest clumps of dark matter in a virtual universe - which could help us find the real thing in space. Using a supercomputer simulation of the universe they achieved a zoom equivalent to being able to see a flea on the surface of the Moon. This meant they could make detailed pictures and analyses of hundreds of virtual dark matter haloes from the very largest (galaxy clusters) to the tiniest (about the same as Earth's mass).

Astronomy / Space Science - Innovation - 02.09.2020
Most massive gravitational wave signal yet poses new mysteries
The most massive gravitational-wave source yet has been detected - a binary black hole merger, which produced a blast equal to the energy of eight Suns, sending shockwaves through the universe. The detection provides answers to some fundamental questions about how black holes are formed - and poses some intriguing new ones.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 27.08.2020
Majority of groundwater stores resilient to climate change
Majority of groundwater stores resilient to climate change
Fewer of the world's large aquifers are depleting than previously estimated, according to a new study by the University of Sussex and UCL. Groundwater, the world's largest distributed store of freshwater, plays a critical role in supplying water for irrigation, drinking and industry, and sustaining vital ecosystems.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 31.07.2020
Universe is more uniform than theory predicts
The Universe is nearly 10 percent more uniform than predicted, according to new results from the Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) co-led by UCL astronomers. The findings, submitted as part of a series of five papers to Astronomy & Astrophysics , suggest that dark matter - which makes up one quarter of the Universe - is more evenly spread than previously thought.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 30.07.2020
CERN reports first evidence for ultra-rare process that could lead to new physics
CERN reports first evidence for ultra-rare process that could lead to new physics
The CERN NA62 collaboration, which is part-funded by the UK's Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) and involves scientists from the University of Bristol, presented at the ICHEP 2020 conference in Prague the first significant experimental evidence for the ultra-rare decay of the charged kaon into a charged pion and two neutrinos, (i.e.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 29.07.2020
NA62 experiment at CERN reports first evidence for ultra-rare process that could lead to new physics
Scientists at CERN, including experts from the University of Birmingham, have reported on their first significant evidence for a process predicted by theory. The findings pave the way for searches for evidence of new physics in particle processes that could explain dark matter and other mysteries of the universe.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 29.07.2020
NA62 experiment at CERN reports first evidence for ultra-rare process that could lead to new physic
Scientists at CERN, including experts from the University of Birmingham, have reported on their first significant evidence for a process predicted by theory. The findings pave the way for searches for evidence of new physics in particle processes that could explain dark matter and other mysteries of the universe.

Astronomy / Space Science - 21.07.2020
'Lost' world's rediscovery is step towards finding habitable planets
’Lost’ world’s rediscovery is step towards finding habitable planets
The rediscovery of a lost planet could pave the way for the detection of a world within the habitable 'Goldilocks zone' in a distant solar system. NGTS-11b is an interesting find that takes us one step closer to finding planets in the Goldilocks zone Ed Gillen The planet, the size and mass of Saturn with an orbit of thirty-five days, is among hundreds of 'lost' worlds that astronomers, including from the University of Cambridge, are using new techniques to track down and characterise, in the hope of finding cooler planets like those in our solar system, and even potentially habitable planets.

Astronomy / Space Science - Computer Science - 21.07.2020
Using techniques learnt in astrophysics, researchers can now forecast drought up to ten weeks ahead
Researchers at the University of Sussex have developed a system which can accurately predict a period of drought in East Africa up to ten weeks ahead. Satellite imagery is already used in Kenya to monitor the state of pastures and determine the health of the vegetation using a metric known as the Vegetation Condition Index.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 14.07.2020
Gravitational wave researchers go beyond the quantum limit
Scientists working at the LIGO facility in the United States, including a team from the University of Birmingham, have demonstrated how the ultra-fine tuning of the instruments enable it to push the boundaries of fundamental laws of physics. The US-based Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory detects gravitational waves produced by catastrophic events in the universe, such as mergers of neutron stars and black holes.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 01.07.2020
Tabletop quantum experiment could detect gravitational waves
Tiny diamond crystals could be used as an incredibly sensitive and small gravitational detector capable of measuring gravitational waves, suggests new UCL-led research. Predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity, gravitational waves are ripples in space-time generated by certain movements of massive objects.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 23.06.2020
LIGO-Virgo finds mystery object in ’mass gap’
An unusual gravitational wave signal is casting new light on the 'mass gap' between neutron stars and black holes. When the most massive stars die, they collapse under their own gravity and leave behind black holes. When stars that are a bit less massive than this die, they explode in a supernova and leave behind dense, dead remnants of stars called neutron stars.

Astronomy / Space Science - 23.06.2020
Gravitational wave scientists grapple with the cosmic mystery of GW190814
A highly unusual gravitational wave signal, detected by the LIGO and Virgo observatories in the US and Italy, was generated by a new class of binary systems (two astronomical objects orbiting around each other), an international team of astrophysicists has confirmed. Scientists from the LIGO and Virgo Collaboration, which includes researchers from the Institute for Gravitational Wave Astronomy at the University of Birmingham, detected the signal, named GW190814, in August 2019.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 23.06.2020
Cardiff student at the centre of LIGO's mysterious new discovery
Cardiff student at the centre of LIGO’s mysterious new discovery
A Cardiff University student has found himself at the centre of a major breakthrough discovery that could potentially help to solve a decades-old mystery. Charlie Hoy, currently in the third year of his PhD and a member of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) Scientific Collaboration, has played a leading role in deciphering new data observed from the violent collision of two objects roughly 800 million light-years away from Earth.
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