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Astronomy / Space Science - 20.01.2020
Astronomers use 'cosmic echo-location' to map black hole surroundings
Astronomers use ’cosmic echo-location’ to map black hole surroundings
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Astronomy / Space Science - 20.01.2020
XMM-Newton uses light echoes to map dynamic black hole
XMM-Newton uses light echoes to map dynamic black hole
Material falling into a black hole throws X-rays out into space - and now, for the first time, the European Space Agency's (ESA) XMM-Newton X-ray observatory has used the reverberating echoes of this light to map the dynamic behaviour and surroundings of a black hole itself. Although most black holes are too small on the sky for us to resolve their immediate surroundings, we can explore these mysterious objects by watching how matter behaves as it nears, and falls into, them.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 14.01.2020
X-rays and gravitational waves will combine to illuminate massive black hole collisions
A new study by a group of researchers at the University of Birmingham has found that collisions of supermassive black holes may be simultaneously observable in both gravitational waves and X-rays at the beginning of the next decade. The European Space Agency (ESA) has recently announced that its two major space observatories of the 2030s will have their launches timed for simultaneous use.

Astronomy / Space Science - 13.01.2020
TESS dates an ancient collision with our galaxy
A single bright star in the constellation of Indus, visible from the southern hemisphere, has revealed new insights on an ancient collision that our galaxy the Milky Way underwent with another smaller galaxy called Gaia-Enceladus early in its history. An international team of scientists led by the University of Birmingham adopted the novel approach of applying the forensic characterisation of a single ancient, bright star called ν Indi as a probe of the history of the Milky Way.

Astronomy / Space Science - 09.01.2020
Scientists spot spectacular neutron star collision
Scientists spot spectacular neutron star collision
The spectacular collision of two neutron stars over 500 million light-years away from Earth has been spotted through the detection of gravitational waves. The neutron stars - remnants of dying stars that undergo catastrophic explosions as they collapse at the end of their lives - merged into an unusually large single object that was around 3.4 times the mass of our sun, the team report.

Astronomy / Space Science - 07.01.2020
LIGO-Virgo Network catches another neutron star collision
LIGO-Virgo Network catches another neutron star collision
On April 25, 2019, the gravitational-wave observatory network that includes the National Science Foundation's LIGO and the European Virgo detectors picked up what appeared to be gravitational ripples from a collision of two neutron stars. Astrophysicists at the University of Birmingham have contributed to a new study confirming that this event, which was witnessed by only one detector in the network, LIGO Livingston, was indeed likely the result of a merger of two neutron stars.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 06.01.2020
UofG gravitational astrophysicists celebrate neutron star collision observation
The publication of a new observation of gravitational wave data is being celebrated by researchers from the University of Glasgow's Institute for Gravitational Research, who helped support the international collaborations which made the detection possible. On April 25, 2019, the observatory known as LIGO Livingston picked up what appeared to be gravitational ripples from a collision of two neutron stars - only the second time this type of event has ever been observed by gravitational wave astronomy.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 19.12.2019
Ultrashort x-ray technique will probe conditions found at the heart of planets
Ultrashort x-ray technique will probe conditions found at the heart of planets
Combining powerful lasers and bright x-rays, Imperial and STFC researchers have demonstrated a technique that will allow new extreme experiments. The new technique would be able to use a single x-ray flash to capture information about extremely dense and hot matter, such as can be found inside gas giant planets or on the crusts of dead stars.

Astronomy / Space Science - 18.12.2019
Podcast: Baby brains, new Mars quests and preventing pandemics
In this edition: We discover treatments for baby brain injuries, see what's new on Mars for 2020 and find out how to prevent pandemics. Play the complete podcast (above) You can catch the podcast on all your favourite platforms. Just click on any of the icons below. OR listen to individual chapters: News: Doctor burnout and Sun discoveries - We discuss a study showing a surprising number of doctors suffer from emotional exhaustion , and discover new insights into the Sun from a spacecraft that has flown closer to our star than ever before.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 11.12.2019
Water common - yet scarce - in exoplanets
Water common - yet scarce - in exoplanets
For Cambridge students For our researchers Business and enterprise Colleges and Departments Email and phone search Give to Cambridge Museums and collections Undergraduate Events and open days Fees and finance Postgraduate Postgraduate courses Fees and funding Frequently asked questions International students Continuing education Executive and professional education Courses in education How the University and Colleges work Visiting the University

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 06.12.2019
Analysis: A spacecraft is starting to unravel the sun’s biggest mysteries
NASA's Parker Solar Probe is going closer to the sun than any spacecraft has been before - Dr Daniel Verscharen (UCL Space & Climate Physics) writes about the findings so far. If you ask a child to paint a picture of the sun, you will most likely get a bright yellow circle on a piece of paper. This is actually quite accurate, given that the sun is a ball of hot gas and that its surface (called the photosphere) mostly shines in bright yellow light.

Astronomy / Space Science - Academic Rankings - 06.12.2019
Researchers named among world's best
Researchers named among world’s best
Durham researchers named among world's best At Durham we've long had a global reputation for the high standard and impact of our research. Now we're celebrating because five of our researchers have been named among the world's best for the quality and influence of their work. The researchers are investigating the origins of the universe, nature-based answers to climate change, and the make-up of the Earth's crust.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 04.12.2019
Closest-ever approach to the Sun gives new insights into the solar wind
Closest-ever approach to the Sun gives new insights into the solar wind
The Parker Solar Probe spacecraft, which has flown closer to the Sun than any mission before, has found new evidence of the origins of the solar wind. NASA's Parker Solar Probe was launched in August 2018. Its first results are published today in a series of four papers in Nature , with Imperial College London scientists among those interpreting some of the key data to reveal how the solar wind is accelerated away from the surface of the Sun.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 03.12.2019
Analysis: We may have solved the mystery of how landslides form on Mars
Mars's huge landslides can move at speeds of up to 360 kilometres an hour for up to tens of kilometres. PhD candidate Giulia Magnarini and Dr Tom Mitchell (UCL Earth Sciences) write about how these landslides may have formed. Some landslides on Mars seem to defy an important law of physics. "Long, runout landslides" are formed by huge volumes of rock and soil moving downslope, largely due to the force of gravity.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 02.12.2019
Global levels of biodiversity could be lower than we think, new study warns
Global levels of biodiversity could be lower than we think, new study warns
Biodiversity across the globe could be in a worse state than previously thought as current biodiversity assessments fail to take into account the long-lasting impact of abrupt land changes, a new study has warned. The study by PhD graduate Dr Martin Jung , Senior Lecturer in Geography Dr Pedram Rowhani and Professor of Conservation Science Jörn Scharlemann , all at the University of Sussex, shows that fewer species and fewer individuals are observed at sites that have been disturbed by an abrupt land change in past decades.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 25.11.2019
Imperial among UK institutions building parts for new £30m neutrino detector
Imperial among UK institutions building parts for new £30m neutrino detector
Researchers at Imperial are starting work on a huge new neutrino experiment, aiming to understand the origin and structure of the universe. The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), to be assembled in the US, will have components designed and built by institutions across the UK, including Imperial.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 21.11.2019
Experiment to increase understanding of the universe secures £30m
UCL scientists working to understand neutrinos and antimatter through DUNE (the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment) will benefit from the UK's latest multi-million pound investment in the project. The DUNE project brings together more than 1,000 physicists from the UK and 31 countries from Asia, Europe and the Americas to build the world's most advanced neutrino observatory, which could lead to profound changes in our understanding of the universe.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 20.11.2019
Cosmic explosions: detecting the highest-energy light
The most energetic form of light has been detected from a distant but powerful cosmic explosion known as a 'gamma-ray burst' for the first time, by an international team including UCL physicists using a UCL-built space telescope onboard NASA's Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory. The discovery and in particular, the unknown mechanisms that cause extremely high-energy light to be emitted in the afterglow of a gamma-ray burst (GRB).

Astronomy / Space Science - 19.11.2019
Evidence of missing neutron star
The leftovers from a spectacular supernova that revolutionised our understanding of how stars end their lives have finally been spotted by astronomers at Cardiff University. The scientists claim to have found evidence of the location of a neutron star that was left behind when a massive star ended its life in a gigantic explosion, leading to a famous supernova dubbed Supernova 1987A.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 01.11.2019
A bird in the nest and moving to Mars: News from the College
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From bird-chick recognition, to Mars explorations, here is some quick-read news from across the College. A bird in the nest Passerine (or ‘perching') birds do not differentiate between the chicks in their nest - meaning they potentially raise chicks that aren't theirs, such as those that are the product of a cheating partner.
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