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Astronomy / Space Science - 12.05.2021
Furthering the exploration of space
Furthering the exploration of space
Durham's researchers are helping to build some of the world's most powerful new telescopes to further our exploration of space. Our astronomers and cosmologists are also involved major international projects that will hunt two of the universe's most mysterious ingredients - dark matter and dark energy - and investigate how the universe formed.

Astronomy / Space Science - Computer Science - 11.05.2021
Building a universe in a supercomputer
Building a universe in a supercomputer
You can't physically crash a planet into another planet in a lab to see what happens or look quite far enough back in time to see how the universe might have formed. So what do you do? At Durham we use supercomputer technology to simulate the universe as we seek to unravel its mysteries. How do galaxies form? What are dark matter and dark energy? And what will be the ultimate fate of the universe? COSMA supercomputer The COSMA supercomputer - with the memory of about 25,000 high-powered laptops - allows researchers to answer these big cosmological questions.

Health - Astronomy / Space Science - 11.05.2021
Impacting life on Earth
Impacting life on Earth
Our Astronomy and Cosmology research is having an impact on life here on Earth. Our researchers are using their skills to help newborn babies, stop the spread of Covid-19 and protect coffee plants. Newborn babies Drawing on their experience of dealing with huge amounts of astronomical data, our researchers have worked with the NHS to establish the standard for recognising vital signs in healthy newborn babies.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 10.05.2021
Discovery of methanol in a 'warm' planet-forming disk
Discovery of methanol in a ’warm’ planet-forming disk
Astronomers have identified the molecule methanol in the 'warm zones' of a protoplanetary disk circling a star about 360 light years from Earth. The finding is significant because although methanol - CH3OH - is one of the simpler complex carbon-based molecules, it is a precursor chemical involved in the creation of more complex substances such as amino acids and proteins, the building blocks of life.

Astronomy / Space Science - 10.05.2021
At the forefront of space research
At the forefront of space research
We're at the forefront of research that is furthering our understanding of the universe and the exploration of space. Durham's research spans from black holes to dark matter, planet formation to galaxy evolution and the Cosmic Web that binds the universe together. We also work on building some the biggest and best new telescopes.

Astronomy / Space Science - 30.04.2021
’Campfires’ offer clue to solar heating mystery
Miniature solar flares nicknamed "campfires", recently discovered near the surface of the Sun, are about 1,000 to 5,000 km tall and between 1-1.5 million degrees hot, finds a new study co-authored by UCL researchers. The study compared data from Solar Orbiter, the Sun-observing mission by ESA and NASA, with observations from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory to triangulate the height of the campfires.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 28.04.2021
Black hole-neutron star collisions may settle dispute over Universe’s expansion
Studying the violent collisions of black holes and neutron stars may soon provide a new measurement of the Universe's expansion rate, helping to resolve a long-standing dispute, suggests a new simulation study led by researchers at UCL. Our two current best ways of estimating the Universe's rate of expansion - measuring the brightness and speed of pulsating and exploding stars, and looking at fluctuations in radiation from the early Universe - give very different answers, suggesting our theory of the Universe may be wrong.

Astronomy / Space Science - 23.04.2021
Black holes to dark matter – an evolving universe
Black holes to dark matter – an evolving universe
From supermassive black holes to the hunt for dark matter, Durham's scientists are at the forefront of investigations into the evolution of the universe. Our astronomers and cosmologists are world-leaders working with fellow researchers across the planet to further our understanding of the cosmos and our place in it.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 20.04.2021
From extravagant to achievable - pushing the boundaries of research to find life beyond Earth
From extravagant to achievable - pushing the boundaries of research to find life beyond Earth
The University of Cambridge is creating a new research initiative, bringing together physicists, chemists, biologists, mathematicians, and earth scientists to answer fundamental questions on the origin and nature of life in the Universe.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 19.04.2021
Durham among first to use Hubble successor
Durham among first to use Hubble successor
Durham's astronomers are playing a key role in the biggest scientific programme to be carried out on the new successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. Our scientists will use NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to hunt for dark matter and investigate early galaxy formation. The JWST is the largest, most powerful space telescope ever built and is scheduled for launch in October 2021 before beginning operations in 2022.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 08.04.2021
Particle’s ’wobble’ hints at new physics
The "wobble", or rate of precession, of the muon particle in a magnetic field is different from what our best theoretical model of the subatomic world would predict, according to an experiment involving UCL researchers that strengthens evidence for new, unknown physics. The Muon g-2 experiment, carried out at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in the United States, measured with unprecedented precision the rate at which the muon "wobbled" (precessed) as it circulated a 15-metre magnetic ring at nearly the speed of light.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 01.04.2021
Distant stars spiralling towards a collision give clues to the forces that bind sub-atomic particles
Bath space scientists have found a new way to probe the internal structure of neutron stars, giving clues about the makeup of matter at an atomic level. Last updated on Tuesday 27 April 2021 Space scientists at the University of Bath and Texas A&M University-Commerce have found a new way to probe the internal structure of neutron stars, giving nuclear physicists a novel tool for studying the structures that make up matter at an atomic level.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 24.03.2021
New image of magnetic fields at black hole's edge
New image of magnetic fields at black hole’s edge
A new image of the supermassive M87 black hole has been unveiled by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) collaboration involving UCL researchers, giving a closer look at how the black hole interacts with the matter surrounding it. The EHT team released the first image of a black hole in 2019, revealing a bright ring-like structure with a dark central region described as the black hole's shadow.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 24.03.2021
New image reveals magnetic fields at black hole’s edge
A new image of the supermassive M87 black hole has been unveiled by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) collaboration involving UCL researchers, giving a closer look at how the black hole interacts with the matter surrounding it. The EHT team released the first image of a black hole in 2019, revealing a bright ring-like structure with a dark central region described as the black hole's shadow.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 12.03.2021
Analysis: How can some planets be hotter than stars?
PhD candidate Quentin Changeat and Dr Billy Edwards (both UCL Physics & Astronomy) explain how we examine the atmospheres of exoplanets (planets outside our solar system) as well as what the benefits of understanding these distant planets could be. Until the early 2000s, the only known planets were located in our own neighbourhood, the Solar System.

Astronomy / Space Science - 12.03.2021
Experts recreate a mechanical Cosmos for the world's first computer
Experts recreate a mechanical Cosmos for the world’s first computer
Researchers at UCL have solved a major piece of the puzzle that makes up the ancient Greek astronomical calculator known as the Antikythera Mechanism, a hand-powered mechanical device that was used to predict astronomical events. Known to many as the world's first analogue computer, the Antikythera Mechanism is the most complex piece of engineering to have survived from the ancient world.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 11.03.2021
Hubble sees new atmosphere forming on a rocky exoplanet
Hubble sees new atmosphere forming on a rocky exoplanet
For the first time, scientists using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have found evidence of volcanic activity reforming the atmosphere on a rocky planet around a distant star. The planet, GJ 1132 b, has a similar density, size, and age to Earth. It is a window onto the geology of another world Paul Rimmer The planet GJ 1132 b appears to have begun life as a gaseous world with a thick blanket of atmosphere.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 09.03.2021
UofG researchers aid in historic meteorite recovery
University of Glasgow researchers have played a key role in the first successful recovery of a meteorite on UK soil in nearly three decades. Dr Luke Daly, from the School of Geographical and Earth Sciences, was part of the international collaboration which tracked the entry of a fireball over Britain on Sunday 28 February.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 04.03.2021
Source of hazardous high-energy particles located in the Sun
The source of potentially hazardous solar particles, released from the Sun at high speed during storms in its outer atmosphere, has been located for the first time by researchers at UCL and George Mason University, Virginia, USA. These particles are highly charged and, if they reach Earth's atmosphere, can potentially disrupt satellites and electronic infrastructure, as well as pose a radiation risk to astronauts and people in airplanes.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 23.02.2021
Glaciers accelerate in the Getz region of West Antarctica
Glaciers accelerate in the Getz region of West Antarctica
Glaciers in West Antarctica are moving more quickly from land into the ocean, contributing to rising global sea levels. A 25-year record of satellite observations has been used to show widespread increases in ice speed across the Getz sector for the first time, with some ice accelerating into the ocean by nearly 50%.
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