Scientists reverse ageing process in rat brain stem cells

Aged rat brain stem cells grown on a soft surface (right) show more healthy, vig

Aged rat brain stem cells grown on a soft surface (right) show more healthy, vigorous growth than similar aged brain stem cells grown on a stiff surface (left). The red marker shows brain stem cells, and the green marker indicates cell proliferation. Credit: Mikey Segel

...when the old brain cells were grown on the soft material, they began to function like young cells - in other words, they were rejuvenated

Kevin Chalut

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