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Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 25.04.2016
One year on - helping Nepal to recover from devastating earthquakes
One year on - helping Nepal to recover from devastating earthquakes
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Health - Earth Sciences - 19.04.2016
New cases of dementia in the UK fall by 20% over two decades
The UK has seen a 20% fall in the incidence of dementia over the past two decades, according to new research from England, led by the University of Cambridge, leading to an estimated 40,000 fewer cases of dementia than previously predicted. However, Our evidence shows that the so-called dementia 'tsunami' is not an inevitability: we can help turn the tide if we take action now Carol Brayne Reports in both the media and from governments have suggested that the world is facing a dementia 'tsunami' of ever-increasing numbers, particularly as populations age.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 19.04.2016
Researcher joins new deep-sea ecosystem study
Researcher joins new deep-sea ecosystem study
Dr Kate Hendry, Royal Society Research Fellow in the School of Earth Sciences, has joined an EU-funded project to examine the ecology and diversity of deep-sea sponge ecosystems in the North Atlantic.

Earth Sciences - 18.04.2016
Becoming an Expert: Oliver Lamb on the complex behaviour of volcanoes
Oliver Lamb is a PhD student in the  Volcanology research group  in the University's School of Environmental Sciences. "Volcanoes are a spectacular and dangerous embodiment of the dynamic nature of our planet. An estimated 800 million people now live within 100 km of an active volcano around the world, and this figure continues to increase every year.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 13.04.2016
Fertilizer's legacy: taking a toll on land and water
Fertilizer’s legacy: taking a toll on land and water
For the first time, an international group of scientists, has come up with a way to estimate on a large scale how phosphorus flows through an environment over many decades. The research team, including the University of Bristol, found the UK is using less fertilizer to grow food and that both historically and currently, it is a world leader in modern wastewater treatment.

Earth Sciences - Economics - 12.04.2016
University of Sussex appoints Adam Tickell as Vice-Chancellor
University of Sussex appoints Adam Tickell as Vice-Chancellor
University of Sussex appoints Adam Tickell as Vice-Chancellor The University of Sussex has appointed Professor Adam Tickell as its eighth Vice-Chancellor.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 30.03.2016
The Channel: a historian’s view of an iconic stretch of water
Water joins as well as divides - and maritime communities often defy the borders imposed by the state.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 30.03.2016
Scientists explain evolution of some of the largest dinosaurs
Scientists explain evolution of some of the largest dinosaurs
Scientists from the University of Liverpool have developed computer models of the bodies of sauropod dinosaurs to examine the evolution of their body shape.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 24.03.2016
Human carbon release rate unprecedented in past 66 million years
Human carbon release rate unprecedented in past 66 million years
Humans are releasing carbon about 10 times faster than during any event in the past 66 million years, according to new research from the University of Hawaii, the University of Bristol and the University of California, published.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 22.03.2016
Nitrogen factories in the Cretaceous Oceans
Nitrogen factories in the Cretaceous Oceans
Scientists have discovered a 'bizarre' microorganism which plays a key role in the food web of Earth's oceans. Researchers from Spain's Institute of Marine Sciences (ICM-CSIC), alongside colleagues at the University of Bristol in the UK, discovered that symbiotic phytoplankton capable of fertilising the ocean with nitrogen 'fertilizer' evolved back in the Cretaceous at a time when the oceans were nutrient deprived.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 16.03.2016
Postcard: Alice Trevail in Antarctica
Postcard: Alice Trevail in Antarctica
Alice Trevail from the University's School of Environmental Sciences has recently returned from field work for her PhD in Antarctica: "Myself and one other seabird researcher, Sebastien Descamps from

Earth Sciences - Environment - 15.03.2016
WATCH: Scientists get up close and personal to an active volcano
Volcanologists from the University took part in an international volcanoes workshop which was held on the active Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala. Santiaguito volcano has been erupting lava since 1922 and every few hours explosions spurt hot ash and fragmented rocks, making it an ideal "natural laboratory" for scientists to study explosive eruptions.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 11.03.2016
Opinion: Five years after Fukushima, there are big lessons for nuclear disaster liability
Makoto Takahashi (Department of Geography) discusses the impact of the Fukushima disaster and Japan's nuclear-liability laws.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 11.03.2016
Researcher reflects on his visit to Fukushima on anniversary
Researcher reflects on his visit to Fukushima on anniversary
An Imperial nuclear expert describes his visit last year to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Reactor Power Plant, five years on from the crisis.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 09.03.2016
New book explores conflict landscapes from above
New book explores conflict landscapes from above
The first book in a new series on material culture and modern conflict, co-edited by Professor Nicholas Saunders of the University of Bristol's Department of Archaeology and Anthropology, will be published this week. Conflict Landscapes and Archaeology from Above ,edited by Birger Stichelbaut and David Cowley, reflects how the study of conflict archaeology has developed rapidly over the last decade, fuelled by technological advances and creative analytical frameworks.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 09.03.2016
Slower evolution and climate change drove ichthyosaurs to extinction
Ichthyosaurs - shark-like marine reptiles from the time of dinosaurs - were driven to extinction by intense climate change and their own failure to evolve quickly enough, according to new research by an international team of scientists.

Earth Sciences - 09.03.2016
Podcast: Meltdown lessons, future food and hunting the Northern Lights
In this edition: Radiation research five years on from Fukushima, food research at the latest Fringe event and aurora adventures.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 02.03.2016
"A load of old rot": fossil of oldest known land-dweller identified
The earliest example of an organism living on land - an early type of fungus - has been identified. The organism, from 440 million years ago, likely kick-started the process of rot and soil formation, which encouraged the later growth and diversification of life on land. Before there could be flowering plants or trees, or the animals that depend on them, the processes of rot and soil formation needed to be established.

Event - Earth Sciences - 26.02.2016
Queen's Anniversary Prize awarded
Queen’s Anniversary Prize awarded

Environment - Earth Sciences - 24.02.2016
Up to four-fifths of wetlands worldwide could be at risk from sea level rise
Researchers have modelled how wetlands might respond to rising sea levels, and found that as much as four-fifths of wetlands worldwide could be lost by the end of the century if sea levels continue to rise. We need integrated management of wetlands and coastal protections on a national and international scale.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 23.02.2016
Pelagios Commons: Finding the Geography in History
An international collaboration dedicated to identifying and recording geographical references in historical documents is launched today at the Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge.

Earth Sciences - Economics - 19.02.2016
World's largest feathered dinosaur coming to Nottingham
A major dinosaur exhibition is coming to Nottingham next summer, thanks to the University's links with China.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 18.02.2016
Sauropod swimmers or walkers?
Sauropod swimmers or walkers?
An international team of scientists, led by the China University of Geosciences in Beijing and including palaeontologists from the University of Bristol, has shed new light on some unusual dinosaur tracks from northern China. The tracks appear to have been made by four-legged sauropod dinosaurs yet only two of their feet have left prints behind.

Earth Sciences - Health - 13.02.2016
Iron levels in 60 seconds - our expert reveals the facts about the mineral
Iron levels in 60 seconds - our expert reveals the facts about the mineral
Dr Claire Shovlin this week published research suggesting iron treatments may trigger DNA damage to cells in the laboratory, after just 10 minutes. Although Dr Shovlin stresses extra iron can be crucial to the health of many people, she says her research suggests we need to think more carefully about the doses doctors prescribe.

Earth Sciences - 09.02.2016
Oxford spinout Zegami launches data discovery software to manage ’information tsunami’
Helping people manage and manipulate tens of thousands of images is the mission of Oxford spinout Zegami, which has raised seed funding from investors including Parkwalk Advisors and Oxford Sciences Innovation.

Chemistry - Earth Sciences - 04.02.2016
Exploring the depths of the South Atlantic Ocean since the last Ice Age
A team of researchers have discovered that the increased levels of CO2 in the atmosphere during the last ice age did not result from reduced density of the deep ocean as previously thought. In the first study of its kind, the team, made up of researchers from The University of Nottingham , the University of Cambridge and the British Antarctic Survey, were able to disprove the theory that the CO2 (that came from the depths of the ocean), was released because deep water became less dense, able to overturn, and ventilate its dissolved carbon to the atmosphere.

Earth Sciences - 03.02.2016
Becoming an Expert: Hannah Whitby on the biogeochemistry of the oceans
Becoming an Expert: Hannah Whitby on the biogeochemistry of the oceans
Hannah Whitby is a PhD student in the University's Department of  Earth, Ocean and Ecological Sciences : "The Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) funds my PhD in marine biogeochemistry, which my friends like to call 'oceans and potions'. The title of my project is 'the relationship between iron, copper and humic substances'.

Earth Sciences - Event - 02.02.2016
NERC award to study the recent extreme floods in Northern England
University researchers have been awarded an Urgency Grant from the Natural Environment Research Council to study lake sedimentary records to see if they provide an insight into how these extreme rece

Earth Sciences - Environment - 02.02.2016
Increase in volcanic eruptions at the end of the ice age caused by melting ice caps and glacial erosion
Researchers have found that glacial erosion and melting ice caps both played a key role in driving the observed global increase in volcanic activity at the end of the last ice age.

Earth Sciences - Event - 27.01.2016
Bristol dominates international geochemistry awards
Bristol dominates international geochemistry awards

Social Sciences - Earth Sciences - 11.01.2016
Do you say splinter, spool, spile or spell? English Dialects app tries to guess your regional accent
A new app which tries to guess your regional accent based on your pronunciation of 26 words and colloquialisms will help Cambridge academics track the movement and changes to English dialects in the modern era.

Earth Sciences - 06.01.2016
Opinion: What science can tell us about the ’world’s largest sapphire’
Simon Redfern (Department of Earth Sciences) discusses how the "Star of Adam" sapphire was formed in the highlands of Sri Lanka.

Earth Sciences - Event - 06.01.2016
Geologist awarded Royal Society Leverhulme Trust Senior Research Fellowship
Professor Dan Faulkner , from the University of Liverpool's Department of Earth, Ocean and Ecological Sciences, has been awarded a Royal Society Leverhulme Trust Senior Research Fellowship to further his research into the mechanics of earthquakes.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 04.01.2016
Current pace of environmental change is unprecedented in Earth's history
Current pace of environmental change is unprecedented in Earth’s history
University of Bristol Cabot Institute researchers and their colleagues today published research that further documents the unprecedented rate of environmental change occurring today, compared to that which occurred during natural events in Earth's history.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 23.12.2015
Mammal diversity exploded immediately after dinosaur extinction
Mammal diversity exploded immediately after dinosaur extinction
The diversity of mammals on Earth exploded straight after the dinosaur extinction event, according to UCL researchers. New analysis of the fossil record shows that placental mammals, the group that today includes nearly 5000 species including humans, became more varied in anatomy during the Paleocene epoch - the 10 million years immediately following the event.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 17.12.2015
'Darwin's puddle' shows how new species can emerge without geographic separation
’Darwin’s puddle’ shows how new species can emerge without geographic separation
Cichlid fish from a tiny volcanic crater lake in Africa have been caught in the act of sympatric speciation, whereby a new species evolves when there is no geographic barrier to physically separate the new species from the old.

Earth Sciences - 17.12.2015
Landslides after Nepal earthquake ’could have been much worse’
Scientists join together to map and assess thousands of co-seismic and post-seismic landslides in aftermath of earthquake.

Earth Sciences - 17.12.2015
Nepal earthquake caused fewer landslides than expected
Scientists join together to map and assess thousands of co-seismic and post-seismic landslides in aftermath of earthquake. Knowing where the landslides are is very useful for policymakers to be able to assess ongoing hazards and plan rebuilding. Evan Miles The 2015 Nepal earthquake which led to the death of around 9,000 people and caused widespread damage initiated fewer landslides than similar seismic events and could have been much worse, according to research released by geologists and glacier experts.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.12.2015
Greenland ice sheet during the twentieth century – a missing link in IPCC's climate report
Greenland ice sheet during the twentieth century – a missing link in IPCC’s climate report
Direct observations of the reduction and melting of the Greenland ice sheet during the last 110 years, made by an international team of climate researchers led by the Centre for GeoGenetics at the Natural History Museum of Denmark and including Professor Jonathan Bamber of the University of Bristol, have been published today in Nature.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 07.12.2015
Stonehenge 'bluestone' quarries confirmed 140 miles away in Wales
Stonehenge ’bluestone’ quarries confirmed 140 miles away in Wales
Excavation of two quarries in Wales by a UCL-led team of archaeologists and geologists has confirmed they are sources of Stonehenge's 'bluestones'- and shed light on how they were quarried and transported.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 03.12.2015
Bristol academics support international climate talks
Bristol academics support international climate talks
Academics from the University of Bristol Cabot Institute are representing the University at the Conference of Parties (COP21), the United Nations climate change conference in Paris.

Earth Sciences - 02.12.2015
Scientists probe ’mystery of the Moho’
Prof Chris MacLeod leads team on a cruise to the Indian Ocean to drill into the Earth's interior An international team of scientists, co-led by Professor Chris MacLeod from the School of Earth and Oc

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 30.11.2015
Opinion: Six amazing dinosaur discoveries that changed the world
David Norman (Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences) discusses the fossil discoveries that really made a difference to science.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 30.11.2015
Rare fossil of a horned dinosaur found from ’lost continent’
A rare fossil from eastern North America of a dog-sized horned dinosaur has been identified by Dr Nick Longrich. The fossil provides evidence of an east-west divide in North American dinosaur evolution. During the Late Cretaceous period, 66-100 million years ago, the land mass that is now North America was split in two continents by a shallow sea, the Western Interior Seaway, which ran from the Gulf of Mexico to the Arctic Ocean.

Earth Sciences - Administration - 24.11.2015
Cardiff academic to raise concerns on breastfeeding rates
An academic from Cardiff University's School of Planning and Geography will today (24 Nov) present her research to a cross-party group of Westminster MPs and peers looking at the issue of breastfeeding in the UK.

Earth Sciences - Event - 19.11.2015
Royal award recognises global impact of Bristol's volcanology research
Royal award recognises global impact of Bristol’s volcanology research
The University of Bristol has been awarded the Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education - the highest accolade for any academic institution - in recognition of its world-leading research in volcanology.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 16.11.2015
’Fourth strand’ of European ancestry originated with hunter-gatherers isolated by Ice Age
Populations of hunter-gatherers weathered Ice Age in apparent isolation in Caucasus mountain region for millennia, later mixing with other ancestral populations, from which emerged the Yamnaya culture that would bring this Caucasus hunter-gatherer lineage to Western Europe.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 16.11.2015
Research to help in nuclear clean-up at Fukushima
Research to help in nuclear clean-up at Fukushima
An Imperial team is carrying out research to help with the clean-up of nuclear waste following the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan.

Earth Sciences - 13.11.2015
World's 10 most dangerous volcanoes identified
World’s 10 most dangerous volcanoes identified
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Event - Earth Sciences - 12.11.2015
Three UCL researchers awarded Philip Leverhulme Prizes
Three UCL researchers awarded Philip Leverhulme Prizes
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