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Life Sciences - Health - 18.11.2023
Molecular causes of rare neurological condition in children revealed
A new study has identified the molecular defects underlying a complex developmental brain condition in children. The team, led by UCL and including Imperial College London researchers, investigated the role of a specific regulatory protein in the brain known as acyl-CoA-binding domain-containing protein 6, or ACBD6.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.11.2023
Hunger hormones impact decision-making brain area to drive behaviour
Hunger hormones impact decision-making brain area to drive behaviour
A hunger hormone produced in the gut can directly impact a decision-making part of the brain in order to drive an animal's behaviour, finds a new study by UCL researchers. The study in mice, published in Neuron , is the first to show how hunger hormones can directly impact activity of the brain's hippocampus when an animal is considering food.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 14.11.2023
New tool to help AI track animals could boost biology research
New tool to help AI track animals could boost biology research
A new machine learning tool from Imperial could help researchers track animal behaviour and pave the way for more AI use in the biological sciences. Biologists often study large numbers of animals to collect data on collective and individual behaviour. New machine learning tools promise to help scientists process the huge amount of data this work generates more quickly while lessening workload.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.11.2023
Exercise at consistent times could help re-align your body clocks for better skeletal health and performance, scientists suggest
Consistent daily patterns of exercise and rest can synchronise the local body clocks associated with joints and spine with the brain clock, potentially helping individuals to maintain skeletal health, improve athletic performance and avoid injury, research by University of Manchester scientists has argued.

Life Sciences - Sport - 14.11.2023
Left-handers aren't better spatially, gaming research shows
Left-handers aren’t better spatially, gaming research shows
Left-handedness is not linked to better spatial skills, despite some previous evidence of a performance gap, according to a large international study led by UCL and University of York researchers. The research, published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B , also sheds light on how left-handedness varies by country, with the highest rates in the Netherlands and lowest in China.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.11.2023
Bendy X-rays and DMT infusions: News from Imperial
Bendy X-rays and DMT infusions: News from Imperial
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From bendy X-rays that could one day improve airport scans and cancer detection, to a psychedelic substance that could treat mental health disorders, here is some quick-read news from across Imperial. Bendy X-ray detectors New materials developed at the University of Surrey involving Imperial College London researchers could pave the way for a new generation of flexible X-ray detectors, with potential applications ranging from cancer treatment to better airport scanners.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.11.2023
Scientists take huge step towards making world's first synthetic yeast genome
Scientists take huge step towards making world’s first synthetic yeast genome
A UK-based team from Imperial College London and the University of Nottingham have produced a synthetic chromosome for a yeast cell. A team of scientists, led by Professor Tom Ellis of Imperial College London and Dr Ben Blount from the University of Nottingham , have built a synthetic version of yeast's Chromosome XI.

Life Sciences - 08.11.2023
Scientists one step closer to re-writing world’s first synthetic yeast genome, unravelling the fundamental building blocks of life
Scientists have engineered a chromosome entirely from scratch that will contribute to the production of the world's first synthetic yeast. Researchers in the Manchester Institute of Biotechnology (MIB) at The University of Manchester have created the tRNA Neochromosome - a chromosome that is new to nature.

Life Sciences - 06.11.2023
First interactive enrichment system for giraffes prototyped in Scottish zoo
Academics and zookeepers in Scotland have teamed up to tackle a tall order: designing the world's first interactive enrichment system for giraffes. Academics and zookeepers in Scotland have teamed up to tackle a tall order: designing the world's first interactive enrichment system for giraffes. Researchers from the University of Glasgow collaborated with animal keepers at Blair Drummond Safari & Adventure Park to develop prototype devices which would allow the park's five giraffes to trigger sounds on demand.

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.11.2023
Chimpanzees use hilltops to conduct reconnaissance on rival groups
Chimpanzees use hilltops to conduct reconnaissance on rival groups
Research on neighbouring chimpanzee communities in the forests of West Africa suggests a warfare tactic not previously seen beyond humans is regularly used by our closest evolutionary relatives. Tactical warfare is considered a driver of human evolution Sylvain Lemoine Chimpanzees use high ground to conduct reconnaissance on rival groups, often before making forays into enemy territory at times when there is reduced risk of confrontation, a new study suggests.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 01.11.2023
How the fish got its shoulder
How the fish got its shoulder
A new analysis of the bones and muscles in ancient fish gives new clues about how the shoulder evolved in animals - including us. The shoulder girdle - the configuration of bones and muscles that in humans support the movement of the arms - is a classic example of an evolutionary 'novelty'. This is where a new anatomical feature appears without any obvious precursors; where there is no smoking gun of which feature clearly led to another.

Life Sciences - 01.11.2023
Starfish body is a head, say scientists
Starfish body is a head, say scientists
The bodies of starfish and other echinoderms are more like heads, according to new research involving the University of Southampton. The research, published today [1 November] in Nature , helps to answer the mystery of how these creatures evolved their distinctive star-shaped body, which has long puzzled scientists.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.11.2023
Fossil fuels responsible for heart arrhythmias in mammals
One of the most common byproducts of the burning of fossil fuels, phenanthrene, causes heart arrythmias in mice, proving for the first time it is toxic to mammals. The study, led by Professor Holly Shiels from The University of Manchester and funded by the British Heart Foundation, is published in the influential National Institute of Health journal Environmental Health Perspectives today (inert date).

Health - Life Sciences - 31.10.2023
Brain pathology of domestic violence
Major international study describes brain pathology of domestic violence Published: 31 October 2023 A major international brain autopsy study of women who had experienced intimate partner violence reveals substantial damage in the brain, but no evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), the neurodegenerative disease recognized among contact sports athletes who sustain repeated head trauma A major international brain autopsy study of wom

Life Sciences - 27.10.2023
Hidden way for us to feel touch uncovered by researchers
Hidden way for us to feel touch uncovered by researchers
Researchers have discovered a hidden mechanism within hair follicles that allow us to feel touch. Previously, touch was thought to be detected only by nerve endings present within the skin and surrounding hair follicles. This new research on cell cultures from Imperial College London has found that that cells within hair follicles - the structures that surround the hair fibre - are also able to detect the sensation.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.10.2023
Hearing ’bad grammar’ results in physical signs of stress - new study reveals
A new study by professors at the University of Birmingham has revealed for the first time how our bodies go into stress-mode when hearing misused grammar.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.10.2023
First digital atlas of human fetal brain development published
The first digital atlas showing how the human brain develops in the womb has been published by a global research team led by the University of Oxford. A team of over 200 researchers around the world, involving multiple health and scientific institutions, led by the University of Oxford, has today published, in the journal Nature , the first digital atlas showing the dynamics of normative maturation of each hemisphere of the fetal brain between 14 and 31 weeks' gestation - a critical period of human development.

Life Sciences - 25.10.2023
Imprinted genes in the ’parenting hub’ of the brain determine if mice are good parents
Cardiff University study identifies Magel2, a novel imprinted gene that affects nesting behaviour. Whether a mouse is a good or bad parent can be traced back to imprinted genes in key neurons in the "parenting hub" in the brain, according to a new study by Anthony Isles of Cardiff University Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics Centre and colleagues, published in the journal PLOS Genetics.

Life Sciences - 24.10.2023
Getting maximum calories in shortest time is the priority for bumblebees
Research has found that bumblebees make foraging choices to collect the most sugar from flowers in the shortest time - even if that means using more energy in the process - to provide an immediate energy boost for the colony. It's amazing that even with a brain smaller than a sesame seed, bumblebees can make such complex decisions.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.10.2023
Risk of degenerative brain disease CTE increases with longer rugby careers
Risk of degenerative brain disease CTE increases with longer rugby careers
A landmark international study has identified a link between Rugby Union career length and the risk of the degenerative brain condition chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) A landmark international study has identified a link between Rugby Union career length and the risk of the degenerative brain condition chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).
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