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Environment - Health - 31.08.2023
Clean Air Zone reduces air pollution levels in Birmingham - study
Clean Air Zone reduces air pollution levels in Birmingham - study
Scientists use innovative techniques to map the environmental impact of Birmingham's Clean Air Zone Birmingham's clean air zone (CAZ) has reduced the levels of nitrogen dioxide gas (NO2) - an air pollutant which adversely affects people's health, a new study reveals. University of Birmingham scientists used an innovative technique to discover that during the CAZ's first seven months of operation, after correction for weather and seasonal effects, it resulted in 'modest, but significant' reductions in NO2 of up to 7.

Environment - 29.08.2023
AI-enhanced audio monitoring shows where monkeys won't go
AI-enhanced audio monitoring shows where monkeys won’t go
By monitoring the calls of spider monkeys, researchers have shown what level of human activity they will tolerate, helping guide conservation. The study, led by Imperial College London researchers, showed that Geoffroy's spider monkeys in Costa Rica are not found in areas with less than 80% forest cover and within one kilometre of a paved main road.

Environment - Health - 24.08.2023
Climate distress related to anxiety and action in young people
Climate distress related to anxiety and action in young people
Researchers have carried out a study to understand the psycho-social impacts of climate crisis on young people in the UK. The study found that distress over climate change is related to many difficult emotions in young people - even in the absence of direct climate-related experience. It can, though, also motivate them to take positive climate actions.

Environment - Life Sciences - 23.08.2023
Vegetarian diet of corals explains age-old mystery dating back to Darwin
Vegetarian diet of corals explains age-old mystery dating back to Darwin
A new study led by the University of Southampton has revealed why coral reefs can thrive in seemingly nutrient poor water, a phenomenon that has fascinated scientists since Charles Darwin. The research shows that corals farm and feed on their photosynthetic symbionts - microscopic algae that live inside their cells.

Environment - Life Sciences - 21.08.2023
Ant invasions cause species loss
New research by Cardiff University has measured the impact of ant invasions on native species at a global scale for the first time - finding that the introduction of invasive ants into new environments can reduce species numbers by 53% through competition and predation. Ants play an important role in helping to maintain stable ecosystems, despite this some species of ants have been transported by humans globally and can cause major problems, even contributing to the extinction of some animal species.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 21.08.2023
Mississippi mud reveals secrets of Antarctica’s ancient expansion
Study of microscopic fossils taken from Mississippi sediment cores reveals climate feedback that acted as temporary brake on an ancient cooling event Clues about the formation of major ice sheets on Antarctica have been found in mud cores drilled in Mississippi, providing an important lesson about a major climate cooling event, sometimes known as the Grande Coupure or great cut.

Life Sciences - Environment - 21.08.2023
Common wasp spreads across UK
The Big Wasp Survey, a citizen science project involving thousands of volunteers throughout the UK, has yielded important genetic insights into the common wasp, reports a study led by UCL researchers. Using data and samples of Vespula vulgaris (a species of yellowjacket wasp known as the Common Wasp) collected by amateur 'citizen scientists', the researchers conducted the first large-scale genetic analysis of the insect across its native range.

Innovation - Environment - 15.08.2023
A new bio-inspired solar leaf design with increased harvesting efficiency
A new bio-inspired solar leaf design with increased harvesting efficiency
New research suggests a new solar energy design, inspired by nature, may pave the way for future renewable energy technologies. Photovoltaic solar energy is obtained by converting sunshine into electricity - and researchers from Imperial have developed a new leaf-like design with increased efficiency.

Environment - Life Sciences - 14.08.2023
Urban great tits have paler plumage than their forest-living relatives
Known for their striking yellow breast feathers and distinctive song, great tits are a common sight in gardens and countryside alike. Now, new research has revealed that some great tits may be more brightly coloured that others, with urban birds found to have paler plumage than their countryside counterparts Known for their striking yellow breast feathers and distinctive song, great tits are a common sight in gardens and countryside alike.

Environment - Paleontology - 11.08.2023
Extreme cooling ended the first human occupation of Europe
Paleoclimate evidence shows that around 1.1 million years ago, the southern European climate cooled significantly and likely caused an extinction of early humans on the continent, according to a new study led by UCL researchers. Published in the journal Science , the team of researchers discovered the occurrence of previously unknown extreme glacial conditions around 1.1 million years ago.

Life Sciences - Environment - 10.08.2023
Warming oceans and rivers cause genomic changes in fish, scientists find
A study of four common fish species by University of Manchester scientists has revealed that gene expression changes when their developing embryos are exposed to warmer waters. The analysis of the small-spotted catshark, zebrafish, European seabass, and the three-spined stickleback is published in the journal Science of The Total Environment.

Environment - 09.08.2023
Customising avatars to look more like you improves learning in virtual environments
Customising avatars to look more like you improves learning in virtual environments
Researchers from REVEAL have shown that even minimal customisation of avatars can help people learn better in a virtual environment. Learning a new skill using VR works better if your virtual instructor is customised to look more like you, according to research by the University of Bath. The study suggests that even minimal customisation can make a difference in how well people learn in a virtual environment.

Environment - 08.08.2023
Beaver-like dams can enhance existing flood management strategies for at-risk communities
Beaver-like dams can enhance existing flood management strategies for at-risk communities
River barriers made up of natural materials like trees, branches, logs and leaves can reduce flooding in at-risk communities by storing water upstream, new research has found. The study, led by scientists from Cardiff University and the University of Worcester, assessed the impact of leaky barriers at a natural flood management site on a small Shropshire river over a period of two years.

Environment - Pedagogy - 08.08.2023
Classroom environmental education doesn't change attitudes
Classroom environmental education doesn’t change attitudes
Researchers at the Milner Centre for Evolution evaluated the effectiveness of conservation educational activities in the Cape Verde Island of Maio. Increasing understanding of conservation issues in schools doesn't necessarily translate into attitude change, says new research from the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath.

Environment - Life Sciences - 07.08.2023
Stealth swimmers: the fish that hide behind others to hunt
An experiment on coral reefs provides the first evidence that predators use other animals for motion camouflage to approach their prey without detection. The shadowing behaviour of the trumpetfish appears a useful strategy to improve its hunting success. James Herbert-Read A new study provides the first experimental evidence that the trumpetfish, Aulostomus maculatus, can conceal itself by swimming closely behind another fish while hunting - and reduce the likelihood of being detected by its prey.

Chemistry - Environment - 03.08.2023
Mussel-inspired membrane can boost sustainability and add value to industrial wastewater treatment
New nanoporous membrane allows highly efficient separation of wastewater components for reuse, offering industries sustainability and added-value benefits Engineers have developed a new kind of membrane that separates chemicals within wastewater so effectively that they can be reused, presenting a new opportunity for industries to improve sustainability, while extracting valuable by-products and chemicals from wastewater.

Environment - 01.08.2023
Spirit mediums could help unlock tourism secrets - study
Spirit mediums could help unlock tourism secrets - study
Taking inspiration from spirit mediums can give researchers powerful new tools to discover more about their specialism. Tourism researchers could learn from spirit mediums to develop a better way of researching by embracing 'nothingness' and opening themselves up to the mysterious and unseen 'atmospheres' that surround us, a new study reveals.

Chemistry - Environment - 25.07.2023
New method of recycling coloured plastics offers possible solution to ’huge environmental challenge’, scientists claim
A new method for recycling coloured plastics has been developed by scientists at Cardiff University. The process, which breaks down coloured polymers, the principal component of plastics, into their original components, could lead to a circular plastic recycling economy reducing pollution on land and in our oceans, the researchers claim.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 24.07.2023
Stinky beach-invading seaweed predicted to spread north
Stinky beach-invading seaweed predicted to spread north
Sargassum seaweed - which wreaks annual havoc on coastal communities across the tropical Atlantic - is predicted to creep further north and into Europe in the coming decades. New research, led by the University of Southampton, has also concluded that sargassum is not the carbon sink it was initially hailed as.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 14.07.2023
Spot marking the beginning of the Anthropocene identified by UCL researchers
Spot marking the beginning of the Anthropocene identified by UCL researchers
A Canadian lake has been proposed as the official point marking the onset of the Anthropocene period by a committee led by a UCL academic. The Anthropocene is a proposed geological time period starting in the 1950s, defined by the impact of human activity on Earth. The term "Anthropocene" has been informally used by scientists for some time to refer to the modern era, but defining the point in time through observed geologic processes is an important step to officially recognising it as a new epoch in Earth's geologic timeline.