news



Error 404
  - Page not found


NO STANDING ANYTIME

You might want to have a look at this:

Categories


Years
2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 2015 | 2016 | 2017 | 2018 | 2019 | 2020 | 2021 | 2022 | 2023 | 2024 |


Last News


Results 41 - 60 of 454.


Sport - Health - 15.02.2024
School uniform policies linked to students getting less exercise
School uniform policies linked to students getting less exercise
School uniform policies could be restricting young people from being active, particularly primary school-aged girls, new research suggests. Social norms and expectations tend to influence what they feel they can do in these clothes. Unfortunately, when it comes to promoting physical health, that's a problem Esther van Sluijs The University of Cambridge study used data about the physical activity participation of more than a million five-to-17-year-olds internationally.

Psychology - Health - 14.02.2024
Hostile environment policies linked to prolonged distress in people with Black Caribbean ancestry
Hostile environment policies linked to prolonged distress in people with Black Caribbean ancestry
Psychological distress increased among people with Black Caribbean heritage in the UK, relative to the White population, following the 2014 Immigration Act and the Windrush scandal, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The researchers say their findings, published in The Lancet Psychiatry , suggest a causal link between government policies and a subsequent decline in mental health.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 14.02.2024
Ultra-processed foods score worse on food package labelling
Ultra-processed foods (UPFs) contain more calories, fat, saturated fat, sugar and salt than minimally-processed foods - but not all'UPFs are unhealthy, according to new research from UCL. For the study, published in The British Journal of Nutrition , scientists wanted to investigate whether food processing information could be a useful indicator of what is healthy to eat.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.02.2024
Targeting inflammation to tackle long covid
Overactivation of the immune system leading to circulation of inflammatory proteins around the body contributes to the development of long covid, and could be targeted to provide treatments for patients, finds new research. Cardiff University research has uncovered biological markers that could be targeted by repurposing medication to treat long covid.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.02.2024
Common human gene mutations linked to a range of health conditions
A common human gene mutation combination - found in around 5% of the UK's black population as well as millions of people worldwide with recent African ancestry - has been linked to a number of health conditions and poor health outcomes in new research. A common human gene mutation combination - found in around 5% of the UK's black population as well as millions of people worldwide with recent African ancestry - has been linked to a number of health conditions and poor health outcomes in new research.

Health - 14.02.2024
Coronaviruses circulate twice yearly in Malawi, not only in winter
Common human coronaviruses circulate twice yearly in Malawi, in contrast to annual winter peaks in more temperate climates, according to new data Common human coronaviruses circulate twice yearly in Malawi, in contrast to annual winter peaks in more temperate climates, according to new data. The latest study, led by researchers at the MRC-University of Glasow Centre for Virus Research (CVR) and published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, may shed some light as to how SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, may circulate in Southern Africa in future years.

Health - Psychology - 13.02.2024
Childhood bullying linked to distrust and mental health problems in adolescence
Study finds childhood bullying linked to distrust and mental health problems in adolescence Teens who experience bullying and develop distrust of others are 3.5 times more likely to experience clinically significant mental health issues by age 17 Teens who experience bullying and develop distrust of others are 3.5 times more likely to experience clinically significant mental health issues by age 17.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 12.02.2024
Protein biomarkers predict dementia 15 years before diagnosis – according to new study
Protein biomarkers predict dementia 15 years before diagnosis - according to new study In the largest study of its kind, scientists have shown how protein "biomarkers" predict dementia 15 years before diagnosis. The research, published today in Nature Aging, shows how profiles of proteins in the blood accurately predict dementia up to 15 years prior to clinical diagnosis.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 12.02.2024
Astronomers uncover previously unknown source of star dust in rare supernova explosion
Astronomers uncover previously unknown source of star dust in rare supernova explosion
The first clear evidence of freshly baked star dust in a Type Ia supernova has been observed by an international team of astronomers. Monitored over the first three years after its explosion, the team claim the supernova - based in a spiral galaxy around 300 million lightyears away - is one of the most prolific dust-producing supernovae ever recorded.

Health - 09.02.2024
Sensors made from 'frozen smoke' can detect toxic formaldehyde in homes and offices
Sensors made from ’frozen smoke’ can detect toxic formaldehyde in homes and offices
Researchers have developed a sensor made from 'frozen smoke' that uses artificial intelligence techniques to detect formaldehyde in real time at concentrations as low as eight parts per billion, far beyond the sensitivity of most indoor air quality sensors. The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, developed sensors made from highly porous materials known as aerogels.

Health - Pharmacology - 09.02.2024
New tumour spatial mapping tool will help clinicians diagnose cancer and personalise treatment
New tumour spatial mapping tool will help clinicians diagnose cancer and personalise treatment
FuncOmap directly maps the functional states of oncoproteins in patients' tumour sections, so that clinicians can predict which treatments will work best. Published on Friday 9 February 2024 Last updated on Monday 19 February 2024 Scientists have developed a new AI tool that maps the function of proteins in a cancerous tumour, enabling clinicians to decide how to target treatment in a more precise way.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 09.02.2024
Industrial pollution leaves its mark in Mediterranean corals
Industrial pollution leaves its mark in Mediterranean corals
For the first time, pollutants from burning fossil fuels have been found embedded in corals, offering scientists a potential new tool to track the history of pollution, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The study, published in the journal Science of the Total Environment , identified carbon particles emitted by burning fossil fuels embedded in the corals of Illa Grossa Bay, off the Columbretes Islands in the Mediterranean Sea.

Health - Pharmacology - 09.02.2024
New malaria vaccine has substantial public health benefit
A recently approved malaria vaccine could prevent hundreds of deaths and hundreds thousands of cases of the disease. Malaria vaccine R21/Matrix-M could prevent one death for approximately every 159 vaccinated children in settings with year-round malaria transmission and for every 153 vaccinated children in seasonal settings over 15 years, according to the modelling study.

Pharmacology - Health - 08.02.2024
Erectile dysfunction drugs linked to reduced Alzheimer’s risk
Drugs commonly used to treat erectile dysfunction may reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The authors of the new Neurology paper found that men prescribed erectile dysfunction drugs were 18% less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease years later. The study included 269,725 men who were diagnosed with erectile dysfunction and who did not have any memory or thinking problems at the start of the study.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 08.02.2024
Ice cores provide first documentation of rapid Antarctic ice loss in the past
Ice cores provide first documentation of rapid Antarctic ice loss in the past
Researchers from the University of Cambridge and the British Antarctic Survey have uncovered the first direct evidence that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet shrunk suddenly and dramatically at the end of the Last Ice Age, around 8,000 years ago. The evidence, contained within an ice core, shows that in one location the ice sheet thinned by 450 metres - that's more than the height of the Empire State Building - in just under 200 years.

Life Sciences - 08.02.2024
New research improves accuracy of molecular quantification in high throughput sequencing
A team at Oxford's Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences (NDORMS) has developed a new approach to significantly improve the accuracy of RNA sequencing. They pinpoint the primary source of inaccurate quantification in both short and long-read RNA sequencing, and have introduced the concept of 'majority vote' error correction leading to a substantial improvement in RNA molecular counting.

Health - Psychology - 08.02.2024
Group physical and mental health rehabilitation improves life quality for people with long covid
A new study has found that an on-line rehabilitation programme improves quality of life for adults with long covid. This is the first randomised trial to show a benefit from rehabilitation for people with long covid, and the first high quality evidence confirming the sustained clinical benefit and lack of harm with rehabilitation programmes for long covid.

Health - 08.02.2024
Fussy eaters are more likely to experience Pica eating disorder
Children who experience eating difficulties, including undereating, overeating, and fussy eating are more likely to experience pica - an eating disorder characterised by eating non-food items such as paper or soap - finds new research by Cardiff University.

Life Sciences - 07.02.2024
New molecular toolkit boosts useful molecule production from yeast communities
New molecular toolkit boosts useful molecule production from yeast communities
Imperial scientists have built a toolkit to boost yeast's ability to produce food, materials, and pharmaceuticals by engineering optimal behaviours. Microbes such as bacteria and yeast are increasingly being used to produce components of medicines, biofuels, and food. Indeed, baker's yeast, also known as brewer's yeast, or Saccharomyces cerevisiae , is responsible for the fermentation process used in making beer or bread but it is also used at scale to produce other molecules of value for industry.

Pharmacology - Health - 07.02.2024
Psychedelic experiences linked with improved sexual function
Magic mushrooms, LSD and other psychoactive compounds may help to improve sexual function for months after the psychedelic experience. These are the findings of the first known scientific investigation into the effects of psychedelics on sex, which finds participants reported improvements across a range of measures for several weeks after an acute psychedelic experience.