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Art and Design - 20.12.2022
Appreciation for artwork affects how viewers remember it
Appreciation for artwork affects how viewers remember it
How much someone likes a piece of artwork can impact their memory of when they first encountered it and which direction they were facing, finds new UCL-led research. The findings show that aesthetic experience is not limited to just the visual features of a piece of artwork, but also the moment in which it was viewed.

Art and Design - Innovation - 02.09.2022
X-rays, AI and 3D printing brings a lost Van Gogh artwork to life
X-rays, AI and 3D printing brings a lost Van Gogh artwork to life
Using X-rays, artificial intelligence and 3D printing, two UCL researchers reproduced a "lost" work of art by renowned Dutch painter Vincent Van Gogh, 135 years after he painted over it. PhD researchers Anthony Bourached (UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology) and George Cann (UCL Space and Climate Physics), working with artist Jesper Eriksson, used cutting edge technology to recreate a long-concealed Van Gogh painting.

Art and Design - Innovation - 02.09.2022
X-rays, AI and 3D printing bring a lost Van Gogh artwork to life
X-rays, AI and 3D printing bring a lost Van Gogh artwork to life
Using X-rays, artificial intelligence and 3D printing, two UCL researchers reproduced a "lost" work of art by renowned Dutch painter Vincent Van Gogh, 135 years after he painted over it. PhD researchers Anthony Bourached (UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology) and George Cann (UCL Space and Climate Physics), working with artist Jesper Eriksson, used cutting edge technology to recreate a long-concealed Van Gogh painting.

Art and Design - 22.08.2022
Research Café: Creative Methods of Research Dissemination and Evaluation
On 7 September, Creative Manchester will be hosting an in-person event exploring creative research methods and how these methods can be used at different stages of the research process. If you have ever considered presenting your research in alternate formats and styles to the written word, this workshop can help you discover innovative and exciting ways to creatively conduct, present, and evaluate your research.

Art and Design - 04.02.2020
New algorithm helps uncover forgotten figures beneath Da Vinci painting
Imperial and National Gallery researchers have used a new algorithm to help visualise hidden drawings beneath Leonardo Da Vinci's Virgin of the Rocks. Imperial College London's Professor Pier Luigi Dragotti and National Gallery 's Dr Catherine Higgitt used the new algorithm combined with a technique called macro X-ray fluorescence (MA-XRF) scanning, which maps chemical elements within paintings.

Art and Design - 11.09.2019
Measuring speed of mental replay of movies reveals new insights into how we access memories
Researchers have discovered that 'fully detailed' memories are stored in the brain, but people access this information at different speeds and levels of detail, with people accessing memories 'forward' that is recalling older information first. They quickly skip episodic blocks of information when recalling events in summary - for example, telling a friend about the plot of a movie they have seen, but can also delve into greater levels of detail at a slower speed when asked about a particular movie scene.

Art and Design - 23.02.2018
Neanderthals were artistic like modern humans, study suggests
Researchers have found the first major evidence that Neanderthals, rather than modern humans, created the world's oldest known cave paintings - suggesting they may have had an artistic sense similar to our own. An international study involving Durham University shows that paintings in three caves in Spain were created more than 64,000 years ago - 20,000 years before modern humans arrived in Europe.

Art and Design - History / Archeology - 25.01.2018
Major Robert Burns Research Revealed - 50 songs were not by Scotland’s national bard
UofG's @P14Murray revealed on @BBCTheOneShow that up to 50 #RobertBurns songs were not really by the Bard! #BurnsNight2018 #UofGRabbie #CheerstoRabbie https://t.co/ZuzzWI7unB pic.twitter.com/0uB6BqTNy8 — University of Glasgow (@UofGlasgow) January 25, 2018 ‌Some 50 airs in an 18th century landmark publication credited with saving Scotland's folk song tradition were not by Robert Burns, according to new University of Glasgow research.

Environment - Art and Design - 29.09.2017
Conservationists should harness ‘Hollywood effect’ to help wildlife
How did Finding Nemo affect clownfish? Was Jaws bad for sharks' Did the remake of the Jungle Book help pangolins? Researchers from Lancaster University and the University of Exeter say conservation scientists could work with filmmakers to harness the "Hollywood effect" to boost conservation. Scientific advisors and product placement are already commonplace in films, and the researchers say similar methods could be used to raise awareness of endangered species and other environmental issues.

Art and Design - Health - 24.07.2017
Musicians have high prevalence of eating disorders, study finds
They may live for the limelight and the call of their muse, but musicians may also be prone to eating disorders, according to new research. A study of active musicians - including amateurs, students, professionals, and retired musicians - has found that they may have a high prevalence of food-related disorders, which could be explained by a combination of personality traits and the demands of the job.

Art and Design - Life Sciences - 02.06.2017
Facial expressions can cause us problems in telling unfamiliar faces apart
Facial expressions can cause us problems in telling unfamiliar faces apart
Using hundreds of faces of actors from movies, psychologists from the University of Bristol have shown how facial expressions can get in the way of our ability to tell unfamiliar faces apart. People's faces change from moment to moment. Even over the course of a conversation with someone, changes are seen in their expressions and in the angle of their head.

Art and Design - 03.05.2017
Greater capacity to detect sound gives autistic people an advantage
Greater capacity to detect sound gives autistic people an advantage
People on the autistic spectrum can take in more sounds at any given moment compared to non-autistic people, according to new research from UCL. Researchers from the Centre for Research in Autism and Education (CRAE) at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE) used two behavioural experiments to examine whether an increased capacity for processing sounds in autism could underlie both difficulties and enhanced auditory abilities that are found in the condition.

Art and Design - 27.03.2017
Birmingham hosts major research conference to help shape better world
A re-examination of the iconic John Constable work, Salisbury Cathedral from the Meadows , has found that the original 1831 exhibited version of the painting did not have a rainbow - and that it was added later to correspond with the time of his best friend's death over a year later. The new research explains how a reassessment of the solar geometry of the painting, and the painter's considerable understanding of contemporary rainbow theory, suggest that that the rainbow was added in at a later date as an homage to John Fisher, who died on the afternoon of 25 August 1832.

Art and Design - Physics - 15.03.2017
Quantum physics offers insight into music expressivity
Quantum physics offers insight into music expressivity
Scientists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) are bringing us closer to understanding the musical experience through a novel approach to analysing a common musical effect known as vibrato. Vibrato is the up-down oscillation in pitch introduced during instrumental or vocal performance, intended to add expressivity and to facilitate sound projection, and commonly used in opera.

Art and Design - 23.02.2017
New £100 million Rosalind Franklin research institute to improve health through physical science innovation
Listening to five minutes of West African or Indian pop music can give the listener more positive attitudes towards those cultures, research from the Universities of Oxford and Exeter has found. Research had previously shown that making music can foster affiliation and cooperation among participants, but this study shows that even listening to music can improve someone's unconscious attitudes towards other cultural groups.

Art and Design - 14.02.2017
Listening to music can improve unconscious attitudes towards other cultures
Listening to five minutes of West African or Indian pop music can give the listener more positive attitudes towards those cultures, research from the Universities of Oxford and Exeter has found. Research had previously shown that making music can foster affiliation and cooperation among participants, but this study shows that even listening to music can improve someone's unconscious attitudes towards other cultural groups.

Art and Design - Health - 12.12.2016
Men should avoid rock music when playing board games, say scientists
Men should avoid rock music when playing board games, say scientists
Mozart may enhance a man's performance in board games - while AC/DC may hinder their chances, according to new research. The scientists behind the study, from Imperial College London and the Royal College of Music , say classical music may be the best option for men when concentrating on a task. Music was found to have no effect on women's performance, though they generally performed better than men at the game involved in the study.

Art and Design - Economics / Business - 06.09.2016
Alcohol content in YouTube music videos breaks industry codes of practice, new study finds
"F**k it! Let's get to drinking - poison our livers!" — some of the lyrics in YouTube music videos which researchers at the UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies say may harmfully influence adolescents in Britain. The new research is an extension of previous work which found that UK teenagers were heavily exposed to images of alcohol and tobacco in YouTube music, effectively glamourising the habits and promoting underage drinking and smoking.

Linguistics / Literature - Art and Design - 22.03.2016
Researchers to investigate the connection between languages and creativity
A new Oxford-led research programme will explore the crucial role of creativity in the use of languages and investigate more creative forms of language learning, providing a forum for universities, schools and other partners to forge a new and more cohesive identity  for modern foreign languages (MFL).
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