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Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 20.06.2024
How high-fibre foods make people feel fuller
How high-fibre foods make people feel fuller
Researchers at Imperial College London have discovered how foods with a higher fibre content keep us feeling more satiated. In a study published today , researchers at Imperial have found that a higher-fibre diet stimulates the release of a key appetite-reducing hormone, in the ileum, part of the small intestine.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 11.06.2024
Plant-based UPFs linked with higher risk of cardiovascular disease
Heavily processed plant-based foods may be worse for heart health than non-processed foods. New analysis of the health impacts of plant-based ultra-processed foods (UPFs) has found they may pose a higher risk for cardiovascular diseases compared to less-processed plant-based foods. The research , led by the University of São Paulo and involving Imperial College London, used data from more than 118,000 people.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 01.05.2024
New research from the RVC and the One Health Poultry Hub reveals speed of avian flu transmission
New research from the RVC and the One Health Poultry Hub reveals speed of avian flu transmission
New research from the Global Challenges Research Fund's (GCRF) One Health Poultry Hub, including researchers from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) has, for the first time, modelled the transmission of avian influenza ('bird flu'), revealing the speed at which it can spread in Asia's live bird markets.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 11.04.2024
Food security in developed countries shows resilience to climate change
Food security in developed countries shows resilience to climate change
A study by the University of Southampton has found that market forces have provided good food price stability over the past half century, despite extreme weather conditions. Research into US wheat commodities by economists at Southampton, in collaboration with UCL, also suggests high uncertainty about the state of future harvests hasn't destabilised the market.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 11.04.2024
Pork labelling schemes ’not helpful’ in making informed buying choices, say researchers
Farmers don't have to choose between lowering environmental impact and improving welfare for their pigs, a new study has found: it is possible to do both. But this is not reflected in the current food labelling schemes relied on by consumers. The way we classify farm types and label pork isn't helpful for making informed decisions when it comes to buying more sustainable meat.

Agronomy / Food Science - 21.02.2024
Breastfed babies less likely to be given treats and sweetened drinks before 12 months
Babies who are breastfed, or partially breastfed, for more than six months are less likely to be given sugar-sweetened drinks and sweet or salty snacks before they are 12 months-old, according to new research. The latest study, led by the University of Glasgow and published in the Maternal and Child Nutrition journal, looked at the links between breastfeeding and complementary feeding, otherwise known as the weaning process, where babies receive only part of their nutrients from milk and need to consume an increasingly varied diet.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 19.02.2024
Potassium depletion in soil threatens global crop yields
Potassium depletion in soil threatens global crop yields
Potassium deficiency in agricultural soils is a largely unrecognised but potentially significant threat to global food security if left unaddressed, finds new research involving researchers at UCL, University of Edinburgh and the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The study, published in Nature Food, found that more potassium is being removed from agricultural soils than is being added, throughout many regions of the world.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 14.02.2024
Ultra-processed foods score worse on food package labelling
Ultra-processed foods (UPFs) contain more calories, fat, saturated fat, sugar and salt than minimally-processed foods - but not all'UPFs are unhealthy, according to new research from UCL. For the study, published in The British Journal of Nutrition , scientists wanted to investigate whether food processing information could be a useful indicator of what is healthy to eat.

Agronomy / Food Science - 24.01.2024
Mechanics behind root vegetable ageing
Mechanics behind root vegetable ageing
Undergraduate research conducted in a kitchen during lockdown could reduce food waste and help keep veg in prime condition for longer Published on Wednesday 24 January 2024 Last updated on Wednesday 24 January 2024 Chopped carrot pieces are among the most universally enjoyed foods and a snacking staple - a mainstay of school lunchboxes, picnics and party platters year-round.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 21.12.2023
Land-cover changes and serotonin levels: News from Imperial
Land-cover changes and serotonin levels: News from Imperial
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From a simulation to understand why land-cover changes have occurred, to a study that found different antidepressants all target serotonin, here is some quick-read news from across Imperial. Changing landscapes When land-cover changes happen, such as during the expansion of agriculture, there are numerous possible interacting reason for such changes, from environmental to social.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 30.11.2023
Largest study of its kind shows leafy greens may decrease bowel cancer risk
Increasing the amount of folate through our diet or taking supplements could help to reduce bowel cancer risk. These are the findings of new research , co-led by Dr Konstantinos Tsilidis from the School of Public Health at Imperial College London. It suggests that increasing the intake of folate - which can be found in leafy greens, such as spinach, cabbage and broccoli - could help to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer by up to 7%.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 20.11.2023
Innovative aquaculture system turns waste wood into nutritious seafood
Innovative aquaculture system turns waste wood into nutritious seafood
Researchers hoping to rebrand a marine pest as a nutritious food have developed the world's first system of farming shipworms, which they have renamed 'Naked Clams'. Naked Clams taste like oysters, they're highly nutritious and they can be produced with a really low impact on the environment. Dr David Willer These long, white saltwater clams are the world's fastest-growing bivalve and can reach 30cm long in just six months.

Earth Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 20.11.2023
Greening vacant land could help Glasgow’s food deserts flourish
A fresh approach to urban agriculture could help Glasgow's 'food deserts' flourish into sources of healthy, affordable produce to help reduce inequality, new research suggests. A fresh approach to urban agriculture could help Glasgow's 'food deserts' flourish into sources of healthy, affordable produce to help reduce inequality, new research suggests.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 25.10.2023
UK air pollution regulations will reduce deaths, but do little to protect ecosystems
UK air pollution regulations will reduce deaths, but do little to protect ecosystems
Existing air pollution regulations will reduce thousands of premature adult deaths in the UK, but even the most effective technically feasible actions, which will save thousands more lives, will do little to protect the country's sensitive ecosystems, find UCL researchers. The new research, published in GeoHealth , found that existing air pollution regulations could avoid 6,751 early deaths amongst adults in the UK by 2030 compared to if no regulations existed.

History / Archeology - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.10.2023
Our European ancestors ate seaweed and freshwater plants
Study reveals our European ancestors ate seaweed and freshwater plants Published: 17 October 2023 Researchers say they have found "definitive" archaeological evidence that seaweeds and other local freshwater plants were eaten in the Mesolithic, through the Neolithic transition to farming and into the Early Middle Ages.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 13.10.2023
Coffee and cocoa plants at risk from pollinator loss
Coffee and cocoa plants at risk from pollinator loss
Tropical crops such as coffee, cocoa, watermelon and mango may be at risk due to the loss of insect pollinators, finds a new study led by UCL and Natural History Museum researchers. Published in Science Advances , the study explores the intricate interplay between climate change, land use change, and their impact on pollinator biodiversity, ultimately revealing significant implications for global crop pollination.

Agronomy / Food Science - Life Sciences - 03.07.2023
Helping plants and bacteria work together reduces fertiliser need
Helping to promote the natural relationship between plants and bacteria could reduce reliance on environmentally damaging fertilisers, a study has found. As the population grows and crop yields are threatened by climate change, scientists are keen to help promote plant growth in a natural and sustainable way.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 21.06.2023
Current conservation policies risk damaging global biodiversity, warn researchers
Current conservation policies risk damaging global biodiversity, warn researchers
Rewilding, organic farming and the so-called -nature friendly farming- measures included in some government conservation policies may accelerate global biodiversity loss, say two leading researchers. These -Green- farming policies risk worsening the global biodiversity crisis by reducing how much food is produced in a region, driving up food imports and increasing environmental damage overseas.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 02.06.2023
Analysis: Europe has lost over half a billion birds in 40 years. What is the single biggest cause?
Analysis: Europe has lost over half a billion birds in 40 years. What is the single biggest cause?
Professor Richard Gregory (UCL Biosciences) explains that pesticides and fertilisers are the single biggest cause of birds shocking decline across Europe and suggests how best to respond, writing in The Conversation. A trickle of studies warning that the enormous variety of living things on Earth is diminishing has turned into a flood.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 05.05.2023
South Korea badger farming linked to illegal wildlife trade and disease concerns
South Korea badger farming linked to illegal wildlife trade and disease concerns
Poorly monitored badger farming and illegal poaching in South Korea is a cause for concern for wildlife and human health, with regulation of the trade urgently needed, according to a new study involving UCL researchers. Published today in the Journal of Asia-Pacific Biodiversity, the study by researchers from UCL, Zoological Society London (ZSL) and Seoul National University, South Korea, found that a growing range of badger-derived products have been introduced to the market in South Korea over the last two decades.
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