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Veterinary - 19.08.2020
Zebra stripes and their role in dazzling flies
Zebra stripes and their role in dazzling flies
The mystery of why zebras have their characteristic stripes has perplexed researchers for over a century. Over the last decade, Professor Tim Caro at the University of Bristol's School of Biological Sciences has examined and discredited many popular theories such as their use as camouflage from predators, a cooling mechanism through the formation of convection currents and a role in social interactions.

Veterinary - 10.08.2020
A quarter of puppies are taken from their mothers prematurely
One in four people acquired their puppies before the advised age of eight weeks old, according to new findings from Dogs Trust's pioneering dog welfare study 'Generation Pup'. The 'cohort' study follows a generation of puppies over the course of their lifetime, to investigate how factors such as environment, social interaction, diet and exercise can impact their development in later life.

Health - Veterinary - 27.07.2020
Scientists identify cat infected with SARS-CoV-2 in the UK
A team of scientists at the University of Glasgow has identified a cat in the UK that was infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Researchers from the MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research (CVR) in partnership with the Veterinary Diagnostic Service (VDS) of the University's School of Veterinary Medicine made the discovery as part of their joint research programme in which they have screened hundreds of samples for COVID-19 infections in the feline population in the UK.

Health - Veterinary - 31.03.2020
Opinion: Can cats really get or pass on COVID-19, as a report from Belgium suggests?
Should we be concerned about the coronavirus spreading to cats' Not yet, says Dr Sarah Caddy in this article for The Conversation, even after a concerning report from Belgium. After reports of two dogs testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 in Hong Kong, the most recent news to cause alarm among animal owners is that of a cat in Belgium with apparent symptoms of the virus that causes COVID-19.

Veterinary - Environment - 28.11.2019
Unique sledge dogs helped the Inuit thrive in the North American Arctic
A unique group of dogs helped the Inuit conquer the tough terrain of the North American Arctic, a major new analysis of the remains of hundreds of animals shows. The results of a major new study on the remains of Artic sledge dogs reveals that the Inuit brought specialised dogs with them when they migrated from Siberia over the Bering Strait into North America.

Veterinary - 14.11.2019
UCL bullying, harassment and sexual misconduct report
In February of this year, UCL launched a new online reporting tool called Report + Support to make reporting issues of bullying, harassment and sexual misconduct easier. Staff and students can report 'anonymously' or 'contact an advisor' to find out their options for support and resolution. Report + Support has been in place for over six months, and as part of the commitment to improve transparency and build trust and confidence in reporting, UCL has published a Six Months Insights Report.

Veterinary - Health - 09.09.2019
Hidden danger from pet dogs in Africa
Hidden danger from pet dogs in Africa
Researchers at the universities of Abuja and Nigeria, in collaboration with the University of Bristol, have detected a potentially human-infective microbe in pet dogs in Nigeria. Dogs in tropical Africa run the risk of contracting canine trypanosomosis if they are bitten by bloodsucking tsetse flies carrying trypanosomes - microscopic, single-celled organisms found in the bloodstream.

Veterinary - Psychology - 17.06.2019
Managing the risk of aggressive dog behaviour
Aggressive behaviour in pet dogs is a serious problem for dog owners across the world, with bite injuries representing a serious risk to both people and other dogs. New research by the University of Bristol has explored the factors that influence how owners manage aggressive behaviour in their dogs.

Veterinary - Life Sciences - 20.02.2019
Reveals why the zebra got its stripes
Reveals why the zebra got its stripes
Why do zebras have stripes' A study published in PLOS ONE today [Wednesday 20 February] takes us another step closer to answering this puzzling question and to understanding how stripes actually work. The evolution of the zebra's two-tone coat has intrigued scientists for over 150 years. Many theories have been proposed, including avoiding predators, better heat regulation and a social function, yet there is still no agreement between scientists.

Veterinary - Social Sciences - 22.11.2018
Awareness of 22q
Awareness of 22q
Researchers at Cardiff University are working to understand a relatively common genetic condition that most people haven't heard of. The ECHO study, based at the Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, aims to identify the challenges faced by people with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS), which is thought to be the second most common genetic condition behind Down's Syndrome.

Veterinary - Materials Science - 21.11.2018
Sugar supplement slows tumour growth and can improve cancer treatment
Mannose sugar, a nutritional supplement, can both slow tumour growth and enhance the effects of chemotherapy in mice with multiple types of cancer. This lab study is a step towards understanding how mannose could be used to help treat cancer. The results of the study today (Wednesday). Tumours use more glucose than normal, healthy tissues.

Veterinary - Health - 21.11.2018
Fish genes hold key to repairing damaged hearts
Fish genes hold key to repairing damaged hearts
The Mexican tetra fish can repair its heart after damage - something researchers have been striving to achieve in humans for years. Now, new research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) published in Cell Reports suggests that a gene called lrrc10 may hold the key to this fish's remarkable ability.

Veterinary - 21.11.2018
Machine learning can be used to predict which patients require emergency admission
Machine learning can help healthcare workers predict whether patients may require emergency hospital admission, new study has shown. Machine learning - a field of artificial intelligence that uses statistical techniques to enable computer systems to 'learn' from data - can be used to analyse electronic health records and predict the risk of emergency hospital admissions, a new study from The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford has found.

Veterinary - Materials Science - 20.11.2018
Modified virus used to kill cancer cells
Scientists have equipped a virus that kills carcinoma cells with a protein so it can also target and kill adjacent cells that are tricked into shielding the cancer from the immune system. It is the first time that cancer-associated fibroblasts within solid tumours - healthy cells that are tricked into protecting the cancer from the immune system and supplying it with growth factors and nutrients - have been specifically targeted in this way.

Veterinary - 01.10.2018
New campaign asks horse owners to help researchers improve care of wounds
Horse owners in the UK are being invited to take part in a new project to help improve the management of the skin and flesh wounds that are a common type of emergency in horses. Researchers at the School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham have teamed up with the equine charity, The British Horse Society , to launch the Equine Wound Project online today, Monday 1 st October 2018.

Health - Veterinary - 20.12.2017
Novel tool for vets and farmers to monitor and reduce antibiotics on dairy farms
Veterinary researchers at the University of Nottingham have produced a new tool to help UK dairy vets and farmers monitor and reduce use of antibiotics in their dairy herds to help combat antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in the farming industry and beyond. It follows a new study by the Nottingham Vet School showing that, in a large sample of dairy farms, 25% of farms used 50% of the total antibiotics used across all farms in a year - with antibiotic footbaths accounting for the biggest volume dispersed into the food chain.

Veterinary - 23.11.2017
FEI extends global equine injuries research agreement with Glasgow University for further two years
The FEI has extended its highly successful global equine injuries research partnership with the University of Glasgow for another two years through to 2019, to further develop the Global Endurance Injuries Study (GEIS). The extension will maximise the impact of the GEIS across Endurance and also look at the potential development of similar methodology for other FEI disciplines.

Health - Veterinary - 07.11.2017
Current cattle injections increase the risk of injury, research finds
Research by experts at The University of Nottingham suggests that current injection techniques in UK dairy cattle need to change to avoid the risk of nerve injury. The study, carried out by a team of vets with anatomical, pathological and clinical expertise, discovered that current methods of injection are more likely to damage the sciatic nerve - particularly in dairy cattle with a low body condition score, such as those cows who have recently calved.

Life Sciences - Veterinary - 31.08.2017
How are antimicrobials used around the world in food-producing animals?
How are antimicrobials used around the world in food-producing animals?
A new study led by academics at the Bristol Veterinary School has reviewed the literature on the use of antimicrobials (AM) in livestock practice together with the views of stakeholders. The study found that although there are some barriers to change, there is a clear awareness of the issue among the livestock sectors and a willingness to modify AM use.

Veterinary - Life Sciences - 18.08.2017
Calves should receive more pain relief during husbandry procedures, researchers find
Calves may not be receiving the right level of pain relief when undergoing routine animal husbandry procedures including castration and disbudding, new research has found. The study from The University of Nottingham School of Veterinary Medicine and Science , published in the Vet Record , found that despite being recognised as being as painful as other procedures, calf husbandry procedures were significantly less likely to include the use of analgesics such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in addition to the local anaesthetic that is routinely used.
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