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Social Sciences - Psychology - 14.10.2019
Opinion: Mental health is a care we must share
Professor Peter Fonagy, Head of UCL Psychology & Language Sciences, writes about how wide social networks can help to shield people from mental disorder, arguing that we should celebrate this collective responsibility. The government published its first national review of children and young people's mental wellbeing on 10 October, World MentaláHealtháDay.

Environment - Psychology - 10.10.2019
Scientists 'must be allowed to cry' about destruction of nature
Scientists ’must be allowed to cry’ about destruction of nature
Scientists witnessing the destruction of the natural world must be supported and "allowed to cry", researchers say. In a letter published in the journal Science , three leading researchers say it is "dangerously misguided" to assume scientists are dispassionate observers. They say many scientists experience "strong grief responses" to the current ecological crisis, and there are profound risks to ignoring this emotional trauma.

Psychology - 10.10.2019
Improving young people’s mental health
How much does social media help or hinder young people's efforts to seek support for their emotional wellbeing? What challenges do students face when accessing services and how might they navigate them? Is there sufficient support available for students with autism? These are some of the questions that lie at the heart of a series of new research projects led by the University of Bristol's Elizabeth Blackwell Institute.

Psychology - 10.10.2019
Rest may help reduce PTSD symptoms
A period of rest following a traumatic event can reduce the subsequent development of involuntary 'memory intrusions'*, one of the hallmark symptoms in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a new UCL study has found. The study, published in Scientific Reports and funded by the European Research Council and Wellcome, suggests memory disturbances in PTSD may be ameliorated by increased 'consolidation' (a process by which memories are stored and contextualised), which could shed new light on treatment and prevention.

Health - Psychology - 10.10.2019
Aims to address suicide prevention in low- and middle-income countries
Aims to address suicide prevention in low- and middle-income countries
Future treatment and prevention of suicidal behaviour in lowand middle-income countries (LMIC) should involve a wider range of approaches beyond just the treatment of psychiatric illness, according to a new University of Bristol study published on World Mental Health Day today [Thursday 10 October] in PLOS Medicine.

Psychology - 27.09.2019
Teenagers less likely to respond to mothers with controlling tone of voice
Teenagers are less likely to cooperate and put effort into their mother's requests when they are said in a controlling tone of voice, researchers have found. Speaking to a son or daughter in a pressurising tone is also accompanied by a range of negative emotions and less feelings of closeness, a new study has discovered.

Health - Psychology - 26.09.2019
Abused or neglected children are four times more likely to develop serious mental illness
A study by the University of Birmingham has shown that children who have experienced child abuse or neglect are four times more likely to develop serious mental illness such as psychoses, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Researchers studied GP records dating between 1995 and 2018 of 217,758 patients aged under 18 who had experienced, or were suspected to have experienced, childhood maltreatment or related concerns, and then compared them to the records of 423,410 patients who had not.

Psychology - 09.09.2019
High levels of sexism could be fuelling poor mental health among women
High levels of sexism could be fuelling poor mental health among women
One in five women report sex discrimination and these women are more likely to develop poorer mental health after the sexist experience, according to a new UCL study investigating links between sexism and mental health and wellbeing. The study, published today in Health Psychology, analysed data from nearly 3,000 women from T he UK Household Longitudinal Study (UKHLS) over a period of four years.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 05.09.2019
Generational study looks for biological links between adverse childhood experiences and self-harm
New research from the University of Bristol is the first to use a large generational family study to examine links between childhood trauma, the impact of inflammation and self-harm. Epidemiologists examined 4300 young people in Bristol's Children of the 90s study to see if adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) such as experiencing abuse, witnessing domestic violence or having separated parents are linked to self-harm at the age of 16.

Psychology - 02.08.2019
Could explain why babies born during winter are at higher risk of developing mental health disorders
Levels of the stress hormone cortisol are higher in women who give birth in the autumn and winter than those who give birth in the spring or summer, finds a new study by researchers at Cardiff University. The new findings could explain why mental health disorders are more common in people born during the winter.

Veterinary Science - Psychology - 17.06.2019
Managing the risk of aggressive dog behaviour
Aggressive behaviour in pet dogs is a serious problem for dog owners across the world, with bite injuries representing a serious risk to both people and other dogs. New research by the University of Bristol has explored the factors that influence how owners manage aggressive behaviour in their dogs.

Health - Psychology - 06.06.2019
Women who are experiencing domestic abuse are nearly three times as likely to develop mental illness
Academics at the University of Birmingham have identified a significant association between mental illness and domestic abuse in UK women. Up until now, there has been confusion whether the mental illness or the abuse came first and very few previous studies have been able to demonstrate the direction of the relationship.

Health - Psychology - 05.06.2019
Despite increase in rates of non-suicidal self-harm, few people receive medical or psychological support
A new study of non-suicidal self-harm in England, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal, suggests that rates grew from around 2 per cent to 6 per cent of the population between 2000 and 2014. At the same time, the study noted no evidence of an increase in treatment contact for this group. Non-suicidal self-harm (NSSH) is defined as self-inflicted harm without suicidal intent.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 18.04.2019
Brain wiring differences identified in children with conduct disorder
Behavioural problems in young people with severe antisocial behaviour - known as conduct disorder - could be caused by differences in the brain's wiring that link the brain's emotional centres together, according to new research led by the University of Birmingham. Conduct disorder affects around 1 in 20 children and teenagers and is one of the most common reasons for referral to child and adolescent mental health services.

Politics - Psychology - 16.04.2019
Political fake news: they might be a liar but they’re my liar
An international collaboration has investigated how people perceive politicians when they spread misinformation. The research found supporters of the politicians reduced their belief in misinformation once corrected, yet their feelings towards the political figure remained unchanged if misinformation was presented alongside an equal number of facts.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 04.04.2019
Care home study will assess if exercising while seated improves the health of frail older adults
Volunteer residents at a care home are taking part in a new University of Birmingham study aimed at assessing whether exercising while seated can improve the health and well-being of frail older adults. The study, called Keeping Active in Residential Elderly (KARE), is being conducted by the Physical Activity and Nutritional INfluences In ageing (PANINI) project research group at the University of Birmingham.

Psychology - 02.04.2019
‘Overcoming Barriers: Autism in the Somali community' film premiere
‘Overcoming Barriers: Autism in the Somali community’ film premiere
World Autism Awareness Day (WAAD) is an internationally recognised day on 2 April every year to raise awareness of the hurdles that people with autism - and others living with autism - face every day. Following research by the University of Bristol, the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and Autism Independence, a film that tells the stories of Bristol-based Somali families affected by autism and the professionals who support them will be premiered tomorrow [Wednesday 3 April].

Psychology - 21.03.2019
Levels of autism in China similar to the West, joint Chinese-UK study shows
Levels of autism in China similar to the West, joint Chinese-UK study shows
Contrary to previous studies, we have shown that the prevalence of autism spectrum conditions in China is in line with that found in the West Dr Sophia Xiang Sun Sign up to receive our weekly research email Our selection of the week's biggest research news and features direct to your inbox from the University of Cambridge.

Psychology - 21.03.2019
Depression in your twenties linked to memory loss in your fifties, find Sussex psychologists
Depression in your twenties linked to memory loss in your fifties, find Sussex psychologists
A new large-scale longitudinal study carried out by University of Sussex psychologists has found a clear link between episodes of depression and anxiety experienced by adults in their twenties, thirties and forties, with a decrease in memory function by the time they are in their fifties. The study, published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, is the first of its kind to look at the relationship between depressive symptoms experienced across three decades of early-mid adulthood and a decline in cognitive function in midlife.

Health - Psychology - 25.02.2019
UofG researchers join largest ever study on depression and anxiety
The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) BioResource and King's College London are partnering with institutions around the UK to call for people from Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales and England with depression or anxiety to join the online Genetic Links to Anxiety and Depression (GLAD) Study.
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