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Pharmacology - Health - 15.01.2019
Elephantiasis and river blindness could be eliminated faster with new molecule
A new potential drug molecule could reduce treatment times for two widespread diseases from weeks to days, ultimately helping to eliminate them. The new molecule has been designed to more effectively target and kill the cause of elephantiasis and river blindness while having potentially fewer side effects.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.01.2019
University launches first-of-its-kind equipment to transform imaging of cells, tissues and materials
The University of Nottingham is the first university in the world to own and operate unique equipment which allows label-free chemical imaging of materials, cells and tissues, with the potential to transform research in these areas. The new 3DOrbiSIMS is the first production instrument of its kind and will have applications in a multi-disciplinary range of research areas, including biomedical implants, drug delivery systems, developing strategies to tackle antimicrobial resistance, organic electronic devices and engineering applications.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.01.2019
New report reveals stark north south divide in painkiller prescribing
A new report has revealed that patients in the north of the country are being prescribed almost four times more opioids to relieve pain than those in the south. The research by the University of Nottingham's School of Pharmacy and the University of Manchester is the first national study to examine the regional variations in opioid prescribing and how this links with socioeconomic status.

Pharmacology - Health - 11.01.2019
Discreet contraception for world’s poorest countries
Innovative microneedle technology is being developed as an effective, pain-free and discreet method of delivering contraception across the world's poorest countries, thanks to a new research consortium led by Cardiff University and supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project will focus on pre-clinical work to develop microneedle patches that have the potential to be painlessly and inconspicuously administered by the user themselves within a few seconds and can last for up to six months.

Health - Pharmacology - 09.01.2019
HRT tablets increase risk of blood clots in women
Women who use certain types of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) are at a higher risk of developing potentially life-threatening blood clots, new research has confirmed. The study, undertaken by researchers at The University of Nottingham and published in the BMJ , found that the risk of developing blood clots was only increased for women using HRT in tablet form and was slightly higher for higher dosages.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.01.2019
Automated phone calls may help patients to take medicines as prescribed, pilot study suggests
Remembering to take medication is vital for managing long term health conditions such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, or multiple conditions. Latest research from the University of Cambridge suggests that using interactive voice response (IVR) technology supports patients to take their medicine as prescribed.

Pharmacology - 06.01.2019
Review finds more effective drugs to stop bleeding after childbirth
New evidence from a Cochrane review published today, led by a University of Birmingham scientist, suggests that alternative drugs may be more effective than the standard drug currently used to stop women bleeding after childbirth. Bleeding after birth, also known as postpartum haemorrhage, is the most common reason why mothers die in childbirth worldwide.

Physics - Pharmacology - 31.12.2018
The 10 most popular Imperial news stories of 2018
The past 12 months have provided many eye-grabbing headlines from the Imperial community, from world-leading research to incredible innovations. Before 2019 is upon us, we take a quick look back at the most popular articles on our award-winning news site (ranked by the number of page views). Here are our top 10 stories of 2018.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.12.2018
£1000: the cost of delivering a Type 2 diabetes remission programme in the NHS
A new study suggests rolling out a Type 2 diabetes remission programme in the NHS could cost around £1,067 per participant in its first year - or, factoring in the likelihood of success, £2,564 for each case of remission. Researchers say findings 'make the case for shifting resources to offer remission' in the future.

Pharmacology - Computer Science - 20.12.2018
Concerns raised as opioid prescriptions rise across UK
Researchers recommend greater action to promote best practice as a new study reveals a rise in prescriptions of opioids for treating chronic pain rise between 1998 and 2018. A review of opioid prescribing in the UK has shown that UK doctors are prescribing more and stronger opioid drugs to patients.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.12.2018
From eyedrops to potential leukaemia treatment
An active ingredient in eye drops that were being developed by experts in Nottingham has shown promise for treating an aggressive form of blood cancer, research has shown. Researchers from the University of Nottingham worked on the research led by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, University of Cambridge, and other collaborators which found that the compound, which targets an essential cancer gene, could kill leukaemia cells without harming non-leukemic blood cells.

Pharmacology - Health - 19.12.2018
Scientists break new ground in potential treatment of common form of leukaemia
Scientists at the University of Glasgow have discovered a potential combination therapy for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), the most common form of leukaemia in the Western world, diagnosed in more than 3,500 people in the UK each year. The research, carried out in collaboration with NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHSGGC) and published in Clinical Cancer Research , found that the combination of ibrutinib, a targeted treatment already in clinical use, with a new inhibitor called AZD8055, helped promote CLL cell death in a preclinical study.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 18.12.2018
Lithium might work as an anti-aging drug, depending on your genes
There is growing evidence that lithium could be re-purposed as an anti-aging drug, and a new study from King's College London suggests that lithium's protective effects are due to a slowing down of the molecular aging process in cells. The research, published today in Neuropsychopharmacology , also finds some individuals may benefit from lithium's anti-aging properties more than others, depending on their genetics.

Pharmacology - 18.12.2018
Ground-breaking languages project to move to the University of Birmingham
Patients with an abnormal heart rhythm that can leave them at a higher risk of suffering from stroke still need treatment even after their heart rhythm seems to have returned to normal, say researchers at the University of Birmingham. Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disturbance, affecting around 1.6 million people in the UK.

Health - Pharmacology - 17.12.2018
Measuring speed of mental replay of movies reveals new insights into how we access memories
Technology from the LHC's ATLAS experiment to be used in cancer detection and treatment at UK's first high energy proton beam therapy centre Technology from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) - where the Higgs Boson was discovered - will be used in hospitals to improve cancer treatments that employ proton beam therapy.

Pharmacology - Health - 17.12.2018
Could cancer anti-sickness drug end the misery for IBS patients?
Could a commonly-prescribed anti-sickness drug be the answer for the 1.3 million people in the UK who suffer the pain and misery of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea (IBS-D)? A nationwide clinical trial led by researchers at The University of Nottingham and funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) will assess the medication ondansetron, which is currently used by doctors to help cancer patients cope with the nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.12.2018
Two generations of alumni celebrate at degree congregation
New recommendations, led by experts at the University of Birmingham, have been published to improve the use of liver blood tests. The recommendations, published in Gut, are aimed at helping healthcare workers diagnose patients with liver disease as well as preventing unnecessary repeat tests for people unlikely to have significant liver disease.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.12.2018
Breast cancer drug could create chink in the armour of pancreatic cancer
The well-known drug tamoxifen could exploit a weakness in the physical 'scaffolds' around tumours, according to research led by Imperial. The report's authors, led by Imperial College London, say that following further research, the drug might in future be repurposed to help treat pancreatic cancer as well.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.12.2018
Childhood leukaemia distinct from adult disease
Scientists have identified and modelled a distinct biology for paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia, one of the major causes of death in children.‌ ‌‌ The breakthrough research, from the University of Glasgow's Institute of Cancer Sciences and published , significantly advances understanding of the disease and provides potential for developing specific treatment strategies for this childhood cancer, which is currently treated with therapies extrapolated from adult practice.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.12.2018
Increasing statins dose and patient adherence could save more lives
Improving adherence to cholesterol-lowering treatments reduces cardiovascular risk for at risk patients. Thousands of heart attacks and deaths from cardiovascular disease could be prevented by patients taking higher doses of statins and taking the drugs as advised by doctors.
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