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Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 09.04.2021
Traumatic brain injuries can increase risk of stroke for up to five years, finds study
Traumatic brain injuries can increase risk of stroke for up to five years, finds study
Stroke risk for patients with traumatic brain injuries is at its highest in the four months following injury and remains significant for up to five years post-injury, finds a new systematic review led by a team at the University of Birmingham. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a global health problem affecting over 60 million people a year worldwide.

Pharmacology - Health - 08.04.2021
New multiple sclerosis subtypes identified using artificial intelligence
New multiple sclerosis subtypes identified using artificial intelligence
Scientists at UCL have used artificial intelligence (AI) to identify three new multiple sclerosis (MS) subtypes. Researchers say the groundbreaking findings will help identify those people more likely to have disease progression and help target treatments more effectively. MS affects over 2.8 million people globally and 130,000 in the UK, and is classified into four* 'courses' (groups), which are defined as either relapsing or progressive.

Environment - Pharmacology - 01.04.2021
Citizen scientists urged to get out into nature to support bee-spotting project this Easter
Citizen scientists are being encouraged to escape the house and help University scientists in their quest to track bees this Easter. As lockdown restrictions ease across Wales, scientists at Cardiff University are asking the public to take part in a biodiversity monitoring project called Spot-a-bee.

Health - Pharmacology - 31.03.2021
Targeting essential protein could lead to new breast cancer treatments
A protein frequently found in high levels in breast cancer cells helps tumours to survive and grow, and could be targeted with a new type of drug that is already being tested for other cancers, new research reveals. The new study confirms that a protein called MCL-1 helps breast cancer cells survive, by hindering cells' natural ability to die through a process called apoptosis, and proves that breast cancer tumours in fact rely on this protein to help them grow more aggressively, by blocking this natural cellular self-destruct function.

Health - Pharmacology - 29.03.2021
Gum disease doubles the risk of high blood pressure
Gum disease doubles the risk of high blood pressure
Adults with periodontitis, a serious gum disease, may be twice as likely to have higher blood pressure compared to those with healthy gums, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. Periodontitis is a severe infection of the gum tissues that can lead to chronic inflammation and destroy the bone that supports the teeth, leading to tooth loss.

Health - Pharmacology - 29.03.2021
Covid-19 vaccine: care home residents gain 62% protection from one dose
A single dose of either the Oxford-AstraZeneca or Pfizer vaccines gives residents of care homes substantial protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection after four weeks, according to new pre-print findings from the Vivaldi study led by UCL researchers.

Health - Pharmacology - 26.03.2021
Study aims to prevent blindness in patients with neurological condition
A new clinical trial being led by the University of Birmingham and University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust aims to identify the best surgical treatment option to prevent blindness in patients with a neurological condition. Funded by almost £1.5 million from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), it is hoped the research will lead to changes in healthcare policy for the treatment of patients with Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH).

Health - Pharmacology - 26.03.2021
Strong immune response following COVID-19 vaccination
Strong immune response following COVID-19 vaccination
A new study carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham with support from the UK Coronavirus Immunology Consortium has found that 99% of people generate a robust immune response against COVID-19 after just one dose of the Pfizer vaccine. The Protective Immunity from T cells to COVID-19 in Health workers study (PITCH) examined how the immune system responds to COVID-19 after one dose of the Pfizer vaccine among people who have been infected by COVID-19 before and those who have not.

Health - Pharmacology - 24.03.2021
University of Bristol continues fight to eradicate deadly disease on World Tuberculosis Day
University of Bristol continues fight to eradicate deadly disease on World Tuberculosis Day
Researchers at the University of Bristol are working on a number of different developments to finally end the TB epidemic. Essential to making this breakthrough are better diagnostic tools, tackling growth in drug-resistance and a better understanding of TB epidemiology. Although TB incidence in the UK is low compared to many parts of the world, it remains a public health threat.

Pharmacology - Health - 23.03.2021
Coming off antipsychotics may take years: first paper on how to withdraw
Withdrawing from antipsychotics may require months or even years, and patients need to gradually reduce to very low doses, according to a new analysis led by UCL and King's College London academics. The review, published in Schizophrenia Bulletin , is the first ever scientific paper outlining how exactly antipsychotic medication should be reduced in order to minimise both withdrawal effects and the risk of relapse.

Pharmacology - Health - 15.03.2021
Vaccine hesitancy more likely in young people, women and some ethnic groups
Young people, women and some ethnic groups, including black, Pakistani and Bangladeshi groups, are less likely to take-up a COVID-19 vaccine when offered, according to new research. In a new large-scale UK-wide study, led by the University of Glasgow in collaboration with the University of Essex, researchers looked at vaccine hesitancy in the population alongside the reasons why the COVID-19 vaccine would be accepted or refused.

Pharmacology - Health - 15.03.2021
Drug dosing technology to improve children’s cancer treatment
A new project has been launched in collaboration with the University of Birmingham aimed at aiding more precise drug dosing in children with cancer. Children receiving chemotherapy treatment each process the drugs differently, leading to inconsistencies in drug concentrations in the blood (known as drug exposure).

Health - Pharmacology - 12.03.2021
Two new diabetes drugs may work better in Asian people
Two relatively-new but increasingly commonly-used diabetes drugs (with one of these classes also now approved for used in heart failure in people with or without diabetes) are possibly more effective in people with an Asian background than in people with a White background, according to new research.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.03.2021
Targeted screening for prostate cancer could prevent one in six deaths
Targeted screening for prostate cancer could prevent one in six deaths
A national screening programme targeted at men who are genetically pre-disposed to prostate cancer, and involving a blood test and MRI scan before an invasive biopsy, could prevent one in six deaths and significantly reduce over-diagnosis, finds a new UCL-led study. Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in men with around 130 new cases diagnosed in the UK every day and more than 10,000 men a year dying as a result of the disease. However, unlike breast and cervical cancer there is currently no national screening programme for this disease in the UK.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 09.03.2021
Research aims to find new treatment for secondary brain damage
Research aims to find new treatment for secondary brain damage
The Universities of Birmingham and Cambridge have launched a new research project aimed at discovering if selective P2X7 receptor blocker drugs can be repurposed to treat patients with secondary brain damage. Funded by almost £1 million from the Medical Research Council , the project will be carried out in two phases over the next three years.

Health - Pharmacology - 08.03.2021
Tocilizumab cuts mortality risk in severely ill COVID-19 patients finds new trial conducted in India
Tocilizumab, an anti-inflammatory drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, improves outcomes in severely ill COVID-19 patients, finds the results of a new trial conducted in hospitals across India - one of the world's most ethnically diverse countries. Researchers from the University of Bristol and Medanta Institute of Education and Research in India who led the study, published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine , say it adds to existing evidence supporting the drug's use in critically ill patients.

Health - Pharmacology - 08.03.2021
Diphtheria risks becoming 'major global threat' again as it evolves resistance to antimicrobials
Diphtheria risks becoming ’major global threat’ again as it evolves resistance to antimicrobials
Diphtheria - a relatively easily-preventable infection - is evolving to become resistant to a number of classes of antibiotics and in future could lead to vaccine escape, warn an international team of researchers from the UK and India.

Health - Pharmacology - 04.03.2021
Rapid point-of-care test for respiratory infections liked by GPs and may reduce antibiotic prescribing
Rapid point-of-care test for respiratory infections liked by GPs and may reduce antibiotic prescribing
A rapid microbiological point-of-care test to diagnose respiratory infections has proved popular with GPs and could reduce antibiotic prescribing in primary care, according to a National Institute for Health Research funded study by researchers at the Centre for Academic Primary Care, University of Bristol.

Health - Pharmacology - 03.03.2021
One dose of COVID-19 vaccines effective against hospitalisations in over 80s
Interim results presented here show the effectiveness of one dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech and Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccines in preventing hospitalisation of people in their 80s with multiple comorbidities. The AvonCAP study results are reported for the first time today [3 March] by researchers from the University of Bristol, University Hospitals Bristol and Weston NHS Foundation Trust (UHBW) and North Bristol NHS Trust (NBT).

Health - Pharmacology - 03.03.2021
OCTAVE to study vaccine responses in patients with impaired immune systems
A new UK study will seek to understand the immune response to COVID-19 vaccinations in patients with certain immunosuppressed conditions, including cancer. The OCTAVE trial, which is funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC), is a collaborative research project involving groups in the Universities of Glasgow, Birmingham, Oxford, Liverpool, Imperial College London and Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust.