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Health - Pharmacology - 28.01.2019
Phone or video call therapy improves health anxiety and saves money
A new study by mental health experts has found that easy-access, remotely-delivered psychological treatment can significantly reduce extreme health anxiety in people who repeatedly go to the doctor, or hospital emergency departments.

Health - Pharmacology - 24.01.2019
New kidney research sheds light on harms of certain drugs
Scientists have identified an enzyme that is a "master regulator" of kidney function that if excessively suppressed, can trigger renal failure. Their findings have implications for the use of existing drugs and the development of new pharmaceuticals. As reported , a global research team led by the University of Bristol studied how the activity of the enzyme GSK3 (Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3) affects the function of podocyte cells, which are crucial in enabling the kidneys to filter blood.

Health - Pharmacology - 24.01.2019
Needle and syringe programmes are highly cost-effective at preventing hepatitis C transmission
Providing clean injecting equipment through needle and syringe programmes is a highly cost-effective way of preventing hepatitis C (HCV) transmission among people who inject drugs and could save millions of pounds in infection treatment costs in the UK, according to research led by the University of Bristol and London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

Health - Pharmacology - 17.01.2019
Finds elevated levels of stress hormone linked to housing type and tenure
A new study examining UK housing data and health outcomes has indicated a link between people living in the private rental sector having higher levels of a stress hormone. The findings, led by researchers at the Universities of Bristol and Essex, are published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.01.2019
More donor livers could be used for transplantation thanks to exciting new development
Scientists at the University of Birmingham have developed a novel eye drop that rapidly reduces sight-threatening scarring to the surface of the eye. The surface of the eye (the cornea) is usually transparent, but scars resulting from eye infection or trauma make it opaque causing blurred vision or in extreme cases complete blindness.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.01.2019
Scientists in China and UK work to help tackle global health epidemics
University of Birmingham scientists are working with partners in Guangzhou to develop new drugs that could help to tackle global health epidemics that also have an impact on China's rural communities. Researchers at University of Birmingham identified a promising hit for anti-Tuberculosis therapy and quickly initiated a drug discovery effort.

Pharmacology - Health - 15.01.2019
Elephantiasis and river blindness could be eliminated faster with new molecule
A new potential drug molecule could reduce treatment times for two widespread diseases from weeks to days, ultimately helping to eliminate them. The new molecule has been designed to more effectively target and kill the cause of elephantiasis and river blindness while having potentially fewer side effects.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.01.2019
University launches first-of-its-kind equipment to transform imaging of cells, tissues and materials
The University of Nottingham is the first university in the world to own and operate unique equipment which allows label-free chemical imaging of materials, cells and tissues, with the potential to transform research in these areas. The new 3DOrbiSIMS is the first production instrument of its kind and will have applications in a multi-disciplinary range of research areas, including biomedical implants, drug delivery systems, developing strategies to tackle antimicrobial resistance, organic electronic devices and engineering applications.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.01.2019
New report reveals stark north south divide in painkiller prescribing
A new report has revealed that patients in the north of the country are being prescribed almost four times more opioids to relieve pain than those in the south. The research by the University of Nottingham's School of Pharmacy and the University of Manchester is the first national study to examine the regional variations in opioid prescribing and how this links with socioeconomic status.

Pharmacology - Health - 11.01.2019
Discreet contraception for world’s poorest countries
Innovative microneedle technology is being developed as an effective, pain-free and discreet method of delivering contraception across the world's poorest countries, thanks to a new research consortium led by Cardiff University and supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project will focus on pre-clinical work to develop microneedle patches that have the potential to be painlessly and inconspicuously administered by the user themselves within a few seconds and can last for up to six months.

Health - Pharmacology - 09.01.2019
HRT tablets increase risk of blood clots in women
Women who use certain types of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) are at a higher risk of developing potentially life-threatening blood clots, new research has confirmed. The study, undertaken by researchers at The University of Nottingham and published in the BMJ , found that the risk of developing blood clots was only increased for women using HRT in tablet form and was slightly higher for higher dosages.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.01.2019
Automated phone calls may help patients to take medicines as prescribed, pilot study suggests
Remembering to take medication is vital for managing long term health conditions such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, or multiple conditions. Latest research from the University of Cambridge suggests that using interactive voice response (IVR) technology supports patients to take their medicine as prescribed.

Pharmacology - 06.01.2019
Review finds more effective drugs to stop bleeding after childbirth
New evidence from a Cochrane review published today, led by a University of Birmingham scientist, suggests that alternative drugs may be more effective than the standard drug currently used to stop women bleeding after childbirth. Bleeding after birth, also known as postpartum haemorrhage, is the most common reason why mothers die in childbirth worldwide.

Physics - Pharmacology - 31.12.2018
The 10 most popular Imperial news stories of 2018
The past 12 months have provided many eye-grabbing headlines from the Imperial community, from world-leading research to incredible innovations. Before 2019 is upon us, we take a quick look back at the most popular articles on our award-winning news site (ranked by the number of page views). Here are our top 10 stories of 2018.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.12.2018
1000: the cost of delivering a Type 2 diabetes remission programme in the NHS
A new study suggests rolling out a Type 2 diabetes remission programme in the NHS could cost around 1,067 per participant in its first year - or, factoring in the likelihood of success, 2,564 for each case of remission. Researchers say findings 'make the case for shifting resources to offer remission' in the future.

Pharmacology - Computer Science - 20.12.2018
Concerns raised as opioid prescriptions rise across UK
Researchers recommend greater action to promote best practice as a new study reveals a rise in prescriptions of opioids for treating chronic pain rise between 1998 and 2018. A review of opioid prescribing in the UK has shown that UK doctors are prescribing more and stronger opioid drugs to patients.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.12.2018
From eyedrops to potential leukaemia treatment
An active ingredient in eye drops that were being developed by experts in Nottingham has shown promise for treating an aggressive form of blood cancer, research has shown. Researchers from the University of Nottingham worked on the research led by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, University of Cambridge, and other collaborators which found that the compound, which targets an essential cancer gene, could kill leukaemia cells without harming non-leukemic blood cells.

Pharmacology - Health - 19.12.2018
Scientists break new ground in potential treatment of common form of leukaemia
Scientists at the University of Glasgow have discovered a potential combination therapy for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), the most common form of leukaemia in the Western world, diagnosed in more than 3,500 people in the UK each year. The research, carried out in collaboration with NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHSGGC) and published in Clinical Cancer Research , found that the combination of ibrutinib, a targeted treatment already in clinical use, with a new inhibitor called AZD8055, helped promote CLL cell death in a preclinical study.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 18.12.2018
Lithium might work as an anti-aging drug, depending on your genes
There is growing evidence that lithium could be re-purposed as an anti-aging drug, and a new study from King's College London suggests that lithium's protective effects are due to a slowing down of the molecular aging process in cells. The research, published today in Neuropsychopharmacology , also finds some individuals may benefit from lithium's anti-aging properties more than others, depending on their genetics.

Pharmacology - 18.12.2018
Ground-breaking languages project to move to the University of Birmingham
Patients with an abnormal heart rhythm that can leave them at a higher risk of suffering from stroke still need treatment even after their heart rhythm seems to have returned to normal, say researchers at the University of Birmingham. Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disturbance, affecting around 1.6 million people in the UK.
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