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Health - Pharmacology - 08.11.2019
UCL hosts minister as part of Tomorrow’s Engineers Week
Universities Minister Chris Skidmore MP visited the UCL Institute of Healthcare Engineering (IHE) Autumn Research Symposium today as part of Tomorrow's Engineers Week. Mr Skidmore met Professor Becky Shipley, Director of the IHE, who with her team demonstrated the REANIMATE project (REAlistic Numerical Image-based Modelling of biological Tissue substratEs), which is a virtual modelling technique that creates highly detailed 3D models of individual cancerous tumours and simulates the delivery of drugs into them.

Pharmacology - Health - 08.11.2019
Immersion in virtual reality scenes of the Arctic helps to ease people’s pain
Watching immersive 3D videos of icy Arctic scenes helps to relieve burning pain and could hold hope for treating chronic pain, a study has found. Scientists from Imperial College London have found that using virtual reality headsets could combat increased sensitivity to pain, by immersing people in scenes of icebergs, frigid oceans and sprawling icescapes.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.11.2019
Potential new target for treatment of inflammatory disease
Researchers led by the University of Birmingham have found a potential new target to treat inflammatory disease. The research, led by scientists at the University of Birmingham's Institute of Inflammation and Ageing , Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, and Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, publishes today in Cell Metabolism.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.11.2019
Simple blood test could better predict both kidney disease and cardiovascular risk
Researchers have found a better way to test for kidney disease using a simple blood test that is affordable and although it is available in NHS laboratories is not yet widely used. Kidney disease and cardiovascular risk could be easier to predict using a simple blood test.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.11.2019
Flu shot can provide effective immunity for people living with HIV
People who are being treated for HIV can gain effective protection against seasonal flu with the influenza (flu) vaccine, new findings confirm. Since people living with HIV can have an impaired immune system and may be at higher risk of serious illness from flu, they are recommended to get the seasonal influenza vaccine every year.

Health - Pharmacology - 01.11.2019
New Glasgow Cancer Tests for research and clinical trials
The Glasgow Precision Oncology Laboratory (GPOL) at the University of Glasgow has developed a ground-breaking new cancer test for research and clinical trials that could ultimately change the way cancer medicine is delivered. The Glasgow Cancer Tests are a suite of affordable solid tumour and blood cancer tests, developed specifically to enable patients to benefit from real-world precision medicine-based cancer treatments.

Health - Pharmacology - 31.10.2019
Measles causes ’immune amnesia’ leaving us vulnerable to other diseases
Scientists have shown how measles causes long-term damage to the immune system, leaving people vulnerable to other infections. The international team, which includes the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Amsterdam and Imperial College London, revealed that the measles virus deletes part of the immune system's memory, removing previously existing immunity to other infections, in both humans and ferrets.

Pharmacology - Health - 23.10.2019
20th century views and responses to drug use are no longer fit for purpose
A report from The Lancet calls for a new international approach to drug use - using evidence-based policies, which adapt faster, and respond more humanely and effectively to new drugs and their changing availability and patterns of use. The five-paper Series publishes as the opioid crisis continues, cannabis legalisation expands, global stimulant problems grow, and the number of new psychoactive substances (NPS) identified continues to increase.

Health - Pharmacology - 23.10.2019
Trial will look at new Parkinson’s treatment for frequent falls
Researchers have been awarded funding to trial a new treatment for frequent falls in patients with advanced Parkinson's. In Parkinson's disease, some parts of the brain begin to deteriorate, leading to symptoms including balance problems, which can increase the chances of falls. A team from Imperial College London and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust have been awarded 250,000 from the Medical Research Council (MRC) to trial a surgical implant that alters nerve activity, which could improve movement and reduce the number of falls.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.10.2019
Detecting the (almost) undetectable: new cancer alliance
UCL research teams are part of a new transatlantic research alliance to develop radical new strategies and technologies to detect cancer at its earliest stage. Cancer Research UK is the lead funder of the International Alliance for Cancer Early Detection (ACED), a 55m investment bringing together UCL, Canary Center at Stanford University, the University of Cambridge, the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, and the University of Manchester.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.10.2019
Researchers identify a new way to target treatment-resistant cancers
An international team of researchers has found a different way cancer becomes resistant to chemotherapy, suggesting a new target for drugs. Chemotherapy kills cancers cells by preventing them from multiplying and by inducing 'cell death', a natural process that can be enhanced with drugs. One form of cell death, called ferroptosis - iron-dependent cell death - is caused by the degradation of fats (lipids) that make up the cell membrane.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 18.10.2019
New clinical research offers possibility of future rehabilitation for patients in vegetative and minimally conscious states
Non-invasive brain stimulation is to be trialed for the first time alongside advanced brain imaging techniques in patients who are minimally conscious or in a vegetative state. The study builds on promising results from the Centre for Human Brain Health at the University of Birmingham which suggested that non-invasive brain stimulation can improve the success of rehabilitation for non-responsive patients.

Pharmacology - Health - 16.10.2019
Global trial is first clear evidence that a widely available drug reduces head injury deaths
A low cost and widely available drug could reduce deaths in traumatic brain injury patients by as much as 20 per cent depending on the severity of injury, according to a major study carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham. The research, published in The Lancet, showed that tranexamic acid (TXA), a drug that prevents bleeding into the brain by inhibiting blood clot breakdown, has the potential to save hundreds of thousands of lives.

Pharmacology - 10.10.2019
Birmingham health research academics call for NHS to act on mental health patient feedback
Researchers from the University of Birmingham are today making a series of recommendations for improving the way that NHS mental health trusts collect and use patient feedback to improve the quality of care for mental health inpatients. As part of a collaborative study funded by NIHR, a team from the Universities of Birmingham, Warwick , Sheffield and Queen Mary University of London , together with the Mental Health Foundation interviewed staff and patients across NHS mental health trusts in England and found that few are collecting patient feedback to actively improve services.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.10.2019
Secrets of lung cancer spread found in patients’ blood and biopsies
Early signs that a patient's lung cancer may spread and become untreatable can be picked up in samples of their blood and tumour, according to a trio of papers co-led by UCL. The three studies, published , are all part of Cancer Research UK's 14million TRACERx project, which aims to understand how lung cancer cells change over time and become resistant to treatment.

Health - Pharmacology - 02.10.2019
Gut bacteria ’fingerprint’ predicts radiotherapy side effects
Scientists have conducted the first clinical study to show a link between types of gut bacteria and radiotherapy-induced gut damage. Taking a 'fingerprint' of the mix of bacteria in the gut can indicate how susceptible individual cancer patients are to gut damage as a result of radiotherapy for prostate and gynaecological cancers, the new study shows.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 01.10.2019
’Poisoned arrowhead’ used by warring bacteria could lead to new antibiotics
A weapon bacteria use to vanquish their competitors could be copied to create new forms of antibiotics, according to Imperial College London research. Researchers have uncovered a novel weapon in the arsenal of bacteria that works in a similar way to common antibiotics. By further understanding and characterizing the molecular targets of VgrG2b, and how the toxin works, this research would support the design of new antibiotics.

Pharmacology - Health - 30.09.2019
Microneedle biosensors accurately detect patient antibiotic levels in real-time
Scientists have successfully used microneedle biosensors to accurately detect changes in antibiotic levels in the body, for the first time. Small, non-invasive patches worn on the skin can accurately detect the levels of medication in a patient's system, matching the accuracy of current clinical methods.

Pharmacology - Health - 30.09.2019
Fruit flies live longer with combination drug treatment
A triple drug combination has been used to extend the lifespan of fruit flies by 48% in a new study led by UCL and the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing. The three drugs are all already in use as medical treatments: lithium as a mood stabiliser, trametinib as a cancer treatment and rapamycin as an immune system regulator.

Health - Pharmacology - 25.09.2019
Powerful new synthetic vaccines to combat epidemics
A new type of vaccine that can be stored at warmer temperatures, removing the need for refrigeration, has been developed for mosquito-borne virus Chikungunya in a major advance in vaccine technology. The findings, published in Science Advances today [Wednesday 25 September], reveal exceptionally promising results for the Chikungunya vaccine candidate, which has been engineered using a synthetic protein scaffold that could revolutionise the way vaccines are designed, produced and stored.