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Health - Pharmacology - 26.09.2023
Fluorescence gives doctors a real-time connection with the health of the gut
Fluorescence gives doctors a real-time connection with the health of the gut
Imperial and US medical technology company MediBeacon have partnered to advance a non-invasive method of assessing intestinal health. In healthy people, the wall of the intestine forms a barrier between the contents of the gut and the rest of the body, with only the nutrients produced by digestion passing through.

Health - Pharmacology - 25.09.2023
New vaccine technology could protect from future viruses and variants
Studies of a 'future-proof' vaccine candidate have shown that just one antigen can be modified to provide a broadly protective immune response in animals. The studies suggest that a single vaccine with combinations of these antigens - a substance that causes the immune system to produce antibodies against it - could protect against an even greater range of current and future coronaviruses.

Health - Pharmacology - 25.09.2023
Widely-used COVID-19 antiviral could be helping SARS-CoV-2 to evolve
Widely-used COVID-19 antiviral could be helping SARS-CoV-2 to evolve
Molnupiravir, an antiviral drug used to treat patients with COVID-19, appears to be driving SARS-CoV-2 to mutate and evolve, with some of these new viruses being transmitted onwards, a new study has shown. It is not clear, however, whether these mutated viruses pose an increased risk to patients or are able to evade the vaccine.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 25.09.2023
Brain imaging tool falls short for human tissue
A common research tool used to measure brain inflammation and test new dementia drugs may not be as helpful as scientists had hoped. In clinical research, scientists use a type of imaging called positron emission tomography (PET) to gain a detailed view of what's happening in the brain. One of the markers targeted by scans, called translocator protein (TSPO), has long been used to measure inflammation driven by microglia - the specialised immune cells in the brain which respond to damage and disease.

Pharmacology - Health - 22.09.2023
AI model aims to predict how medicines taste
AI model aims to predict how medicines taste
A team from the UCL Global Business School for Health (GBSH) and the UCL School of Pharmacy are using data collected from an "electric tongue" to create an AI model for predicting the bitterness of drugs. Taste is key to making sure people regularly take their medications and is an important part of drug development.

Pharmacology - 18.09.2023
Portable device instantly detects illegal drugs with 95% accuracy
Portable device instantly detects illegal drugs with 95% accuracy
An ultraportable, low-cost device invented by researchers at the University of Bath proves highly successful at detecting the street drug Spice. Published on Monday 18 September 2023 Last updated on Tuesday 26 September 2023 A device that lights up in the presence of illegal drugs soaked into paper or fabric is expected to be cleared for rollout across the UK over the next few months.

Health - Pharmacology - 12.09.2023
Health of young people with ulcerative colitis at risk due to ceasing medication
Nearly 70 per cent of adolescents and young adults with ulcerative colitis stop taking medication to treat the disease within a year of diagnosis. Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that causes inflammation and ulcers (sores) in the intestine, and it affects around 200,000 people in the UK.

Health - Pharmacology - 30.08.2023
Antibiotics promote the growth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the gut
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria get extra nutrients and thrive when the drugs kill 'good' bacteria in the gut. This is according to new research led by Imperial College London scientists, which could lead to better patient risk assessment and 'microbiome therapeutics' treatments to help combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Health - Pharmacology - 29.08.2023
Kidney enzyme as a new target for treatment of high blood pressure
Persistent high blood pressure - or hypertension - can increase the risk of a number of serious and potentially life-threatening health conditions, such as heart disease, heart attacks and strokes. The team of researchers, funded by the British Heart Foundation , and supported by the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) Manchester Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) were investigating the kidney - the key organ responsible for the development of high blood pressure.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.08.2023
AI analysis of a handheld device holds potential to speed up detection of heart failure
Using AI to interpret images from a handheld ultrasound device is comparable at detecting how well the heart pumps as the gold-standard of diagnosis currently used in the NHS. The breakthrough new findings suggest that the use of AI could significantly speed up heart failure diagnosis waiting times. Using AI to interpret images from a handheld ultrasound device is comparable at detecting how well the heart pumps as the gold-standard of diagnosis currently used in the NHS.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.08.2023
Easier diagnosis of childhood fever using a new rapid blood test
Easier diagnosis of childhood fever using a new rapid blood test
A simple blood test which may be able to rapidly diagnose the cause of a child's illness could be 'transformative', say researchers. An international team, led by researchers at Imperial College London, has developed and validated a diagnostic approach capable of simultaneously detecting and distinguishing between 18 infectious or inflammatory diseases - including group B Streptococcus (GBS), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and tuberculosis - with the potential to provide a result in a fraction of the time of current diagnostic tests.

Health - Pharmacology - 17.08.2023
Diabetes drug may offer new treatment hope for chronic myeloid leukaemia
A drug developed to combat type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease may offer new treatment hope for people with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), a form of blood cancer A drug being developed to combat metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease may offer new treatment hope for people with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), a form of blood cancer.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.08.2023
Research helps to identify immunosuppressed people least likely to have COVID-19 antibodies
New research involving the University of Southampton has identified which people with compromised immune systems are less likely to have COVID-19 antibodies - making them more vulnerable to a severe infection. Around one in five people with solid organ transplant, rare autoimmune disease or blood cancer affecting lymphocytes had no COVID-19 antibodies after three or more vaccinations.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.08.2023
New study offers hope in early detection of oesophageal cancer
Researchers at Oxford University's Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences have developed a new tool to predict people's risks of getting oesophageal cancer in the next ten years. Researchers in the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences at the University of Oxford have today unveiled a ground-breaking tool that could revolutionise the early detection of oesophageal cancer - the long tube that carries food from the throat to the stomach.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.08.2023
Psychedelic treatments and exercise for children: News from the College
Psychedelic treatments and exercise for children: News from the College
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From psychedelic therapies to exercise interventions for school pupils, here is some quick-read news from across the College. Psychedelic gambling treatment Researchers in Imperial's Centre for Psychedelic Research are set to investigate whether the active compound in magic mushrooms could help problem gamblers to break their addiction.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.08.2023
Raised blood sugar levels linked with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases
Raised blood sugar levels linked with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases
Men and women with raised blood sugar levels have 30-50% greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease even when these levels are below the threshold for diabetes, according to a new study led by researchers at UCL and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM). The study, published in The Lancet Regional Health - Europe, also found that, among people diagnosed with diabetes, women's higher relative risk of developing any cardiovascular disease than men disappeared once modifiable factors such as body measurements and medication use were taken into account.

Pharmacology - Health - 09.08.2023
Treatments for poxviruses - including those causing mpox and smallpox - may already exist in licensed drugs
Scientists have discovered how poxviruses evade natural defences in living cells, and realised that drugs to stop them doing this are already available. The drugs we identified may be more durable than the current treatment for monkeypox..and also effective against a range of other poxviruses Geoffrey Smith Scientists studying how poxviruses evade natural defences in human cells have identified a new approach to treatment that may be more durable than current treatments.

Pharmacology - Health - 07.08.2023
Key cause of restricted blood flow to the brain in vascular dementia
European research to tackle the triple challenge of dementia, hearing and vision impairment Researchers hope the discovery will accelerate development of treatments for the condition which affects around 150,000 people in the UK New research on mice has shed light on how high blood pressure causes changes to arteries in the brain, a process that leads to vascular dementia.

Pharmacology - Health - 04.08.2023
Risk of overdose higher when opioid agonists prescribed with other medicines
Patients prescribed medicines to replace illicit drugs are at higher risk of overdose resulting in hospital admission when taking other medicines which treat mental health conditions or pain, University of Manchester researchers have found. The authors of the study, published in the journal Addiction today (04/08/23), say doctors should avoid co-prescription of opioid agonists, with benzodiazepines, gabapentinoids, antipsychotics or Z-drugs if harm is greater than the benefit to patients.

Health - Pharmacology - 24.07.2023
Superior T-cell discovered in cancer survivors
Superior T-cell discovered in cancer survivors
Scientists from Cardiff University have discovered a superior form of killer T-cell in patients who have successfully cleared end stage solid cancer. Published today in the journal Cell , the researchers discovered that dominant, successful killer T-cells were capable of recognising multiple different cancer-associated targets at the same time.