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Pedagogy - Psychology - 08.02.2019
Thinking positively during pregnancy? You could be helping your child’s ability in maths and science
Your attitude during pregnancy could have an effect on your child's ability in maths and science, according to a new study published by Frontiers in Psychology today. Using data from Bristol's Children of the 90s study the research is one of a series from the University of Bristol , that examines a parental personality attribute known as the 'locus of control'.

Pedagogy - 28.01.2019
Screen time before bed puts children at risk of anxiety, obesity and poor sleep
Pre-teens who use a mobile phone or watch TV in the dark an hour before bed are at risk of not getting enough sleep, a new study reveals. The risk is comparatively lower for children who use these devices in a lit room or do not use them at all before bedtime. Pre-sleep device use The study by researchers from Imperial College London, the University of Lincoln, Birkbeck University and the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute in Basel, Swit

Pedagogy - Health - 10.08.2018
Men take care of their spouses just as well as women
Men respond to their spouse's illness just as much as women do and as a result are better caregivers in later life than previous research suggests, according to a new Oxford University collaboration. Men respond to their spouse's illness just as much as women do and as a result are better caregivers in later life than previous research suggests, according to a new Oxford University collaboration.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 20.07.2018
Young people who frequently argue with their parents are better citizens, research finds
Teenagers who regularly clash with their parents are more likely to have given time to a charity or humanitarian cause, a study has shown. The survey of 13 and 14 year-olds carried out by academics at Cardiff University, showed those who argued "a lot" with their mother and father, compared to those who "never" argued, were also more likely to have been involved with a human rights organisation in the past 12 months and to have contacted a politician or signed a petition.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 15.06.2018
Migrant children less obese due to absent grandmothers - study
Children of migrants to Chinese cities have lower rates of obesity than youngsters in more affluent established urban families - probably because their grandparents are not around to over-feed them, a new study has found. Fewer opportunities for unhealthy snacking and less pressure for academic achievement, leading to more active play, also contribute to migrant children's lower obesity rates.

Pedagogy - Health - 12.06.2018
Mother’s attitude towards baby during pregnancy may have implications for child’s development
Mothers who 'connect' with their baby during pregnancy are more likely to interact in a more positive way with their infant after it is born, according to a study carried out at the University of Cambridge. Interaction is important for helping infants learn and develop. Although we found a relationship between a mother's attitude towards her baby during pregnancy and her later interactions, this link was only modest.

Pedagogy - Economics - 05.06.2018
Immigrant and disadvantaged children benefit most from early childcare
Attending universal childcare from age three significantly improves the school readiness of children from immigrant and disadvantaged family backgrounds, a new UCL study has found. However, the research by the Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), shows the same universal childcare, only has a modest impact on the school readiness of children from advantaged backgrounds.

Health - Pedagogy - 05.04.2018
Three-quarters of COPD cases are linked to childhood risk factors that are exacerbated in adulthood
Three-quarters of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) cases have their origins in poor lung function pathways beginning in childhood. These pathways are associated with exposures in childhood, and amplified by factors in adulthood, according to a cohort study published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal.

Pedagogy - 28.03.2018
Thousands of children of EU parents at risk of falling into the cracks of Brexit - research
Some memories containing inaccurate information can be beneficial to dementia sufferers because it enables them to retain key information researchers say. The University of Birmingham researchers suggest that distorted memories play a role in preserving knowledge for someone with dementia and that the role they play should be evaluated.

Pedagogy - 23.03.2018
Birmingham and Nankai launch Institute to tackle global green challenges
New research has found no evidence Omega-3 fish oil supplements help aid or improve the reading ability or memory function of underperforming school-children. These findings are in contradiction to an earlier study run by the same team using the same supplement. In the second high quality trial of its kind, published in PLOS-ONE , the researchers found an entirely different result to an earlier study carried out in 2012 , where omega-3 supplements were found to have a beneficial effect on the reading ability and working memory of school children with learning needs such as ADHD.

Pedagogy - Psychology - 12.03.2018
Multi-million pound award aims to create new breakthrough therapies
Researchers have made a major breakthrough in the assessment of language development among bilingual families and in the identification of those children who require extra support to improve their language skills. During a three-year study involving nine UK universities including the University of Birmingham, academics interviewed almost 400 families with two-year-old children learning English and another of 13 common additional languages.

Pedagogy - 27.11.2017
Deaths during childbirth reduce by half, report reveals
The extent of grandparents providing childcare in the UK is much higher than previously thought and is a factor in assisting mums, who had taken time out from work to have children, to get back into the workplace, according to new research carried out at the University of Birmingham. The study, published in the Journal of Social Policy, found that grandparents were the first named source of after school and weekend care for 36% of school entry year children for lone parents and 32% for partnered mothers.

Pedagogy - 06.09.2017
Schools "teaching in ’ability’ sets despite evidence this may cause harm
Schools are rejecting the chance to teach children in "mixed-ability" classes despite evidence that the alternative - pupils being put in ability sets or streams - will have a negative effect on at least some of their charges' results, according to new research from UCL. The paper - "Factors deterring schools from mixed attainment grouping practices," written by Dr Becky Taylor, UCL Institute of Education (IOE), together with academics from Queen's University, Belfast, was presented yesterday at the British Educational Research Association's (BERA) annual conference.

Pedagogy - Health - 31.08.2017
Children’s sleep quality linked to mothers’ insomnia
Children sleep more poorly if their mothers suffer from insomnia symptoms - potentially affecting their mental wellbeing and development - according to new research by the University of Warwick and the University of Basel.

Pedagogy - Media - 29.08.2017
Apps ‘don’t affect children’s language development’ if parents still read stories
Watching television or playing with smart phone apps does not have any effect on children's language development - providing they still spend time reading, researchers have found. A study from the University of Salford and Lancaster University, published in the Journal Of Children And Media , has found that as long as parents or carers spend time reading with young children, and this time is not reduced in place of television or touchscreen devices such as iPads, children's exposure to these media should have no effect on the size of their vocabulary.

Pedagogy - Health - 20.08.2017
Health benefits from lone parents welfare to work policies unlikely
Improvements in health have been used to justify mandating employment for lone parents, but new research shows that their health is unlikely to improve under these measures. The Cochrane Review, which is published today, was led by Dr Marcia Gibson from the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow.

Pedagogy - 21.06.2017
When estimating extinction risk, don’t leave out the males
Extinction risk for some species could be drastically underestimated because most demographic models of animal populations only analyse the number and fertility of females, dismissing male data as 'noise'. An international team of researchers, including a PhD student and a professor from the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath, found that population growth in birds was very sensitive to the ratio of males to females in a population, called the adult sex ratio (ASR), which has previously been shown to affect mating behaviour.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 25.05.2017
IVF babies do not have lower cognitive skills than naturally conceived children
New research shows that between the ages of three and 11, children conceived artificially can be linked with better scores for reading and verbal tests than children conceived naturally. Researchers analysed data of hundreds of UK children who had been born through IVF or ICSI (when the man has a low sperm count), testing the same groups of children every few years up to the age of 11.

Pedagogy - 28.03.2017
If at first you don't succeed: Why repetition may hold key to helping children with specific language impairment
If at first you don’t succeed: Why repetition may hold key to helping children with specific language impairment
If at first you don't succeed: Why repetition may hold key to helping children with specific language impairment Simple repetition learning techniques could help young children struggling with language to learn vocabulary faster, according to the latest research from scientists from the UK and Germany.

Health - Pedagogy - 08.03.2017
Parental concerns reduce uptake of child flu vaccine
The first study investigating parental attitudes towards the UK's child flu vaccine has found concerns about safety and side effects may negatively influence uptake, and recommends that public health messages need to be reinforced. Led by King's College London and published today in Vaccine , the research shows that not having the vaccine was associated with concerns about its safety, short-term side effects and long-term health problems.