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Health - Life Sciences - 22.03.2024
Scientists close in on TB blood test which could detect millions of silent spreaders
Scientists have taken a major step towards developing a blood test that could identify millions of people who spread tuberculosis unknowingly. A breakthrough study has discovered a group of biological markers that are found in high levels among infectious patients. The researchers hope the findings will pave the way for a simple test that can diagnose and stop the spread of the estimated 10 million cases annually.

Physics - Life Sciences - 21.03.2024
High speed protein movies to aid drug design
High speed protein movies to aid drug design
Researchers from the University of Southampton have developed technology to help scientists observe proteins in motion. Understanding how proteins move will allow novel drugs to be designed. X-ray crystallography is a scientific method which produces a 3D picture of molecules with exquisite, atomic-level detail.

Environment - Life Sciences - 21.03.2024
Climate change disrupts vital ecosystems in the Alps
Reduced snow cover and shifting vegetation patterns in the Alps, both driven by climate change, are having major combined impacts on biodiversity and functioning of ecosystems in the high mountains, according to new research published today. Mountain ranges covering vast areas of the world are warming much faster than surrounding lowland areas, triggering huge reductions in snow cover and rapid upward movement of dwarf-shrubs, such as heather.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 19.03.2024
Researchers uncover remarkable archive of ancient human brains
A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Oxford has challenged previously held views that brain preservation in the archaeological record is extremely rare. The team carried out the largest study to date of the global archaeological literature about preserved human brains to compile an archive that exceeds 20-fold the number of brains previously compiled.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.03.2024
Cells harvested from urine may have diagnostic potential for kidney disease, find scientists
Genes expressed in human cells harvested from urine are remarkably similar to those of the kidney itself, suggesting they could be an important non-invasive source of information on the kidney. The news offers hope that doctors may one day be able to investigate suspected kidney pathologies without carrying out invasive procedures such as biopsies, raising the tantalising prospect of earlier and simpler disease detection.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.03.2024
Longer mobile phone use does not increase the risk of brain tumours
Longer mobile phone use does not increase the risk of brain tumours
Using a mobile phone for extended periods is not linked with an increased risk of brain cancer, a study shows. These are the findings from the COSMOS study, a large international project led by researchers at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Imperial College London. Starting in 2007, researchers studied more than 250,000 mobile phone users to investigate if extensive use of mobile phones increases the risk of brain tumours over time.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.03.2024
Cheetahs' unrivalled speed explained by their 'sweet spot' size, finds study
Cheetahs’ unrivalled speed explained by their ’sweet spot’ size, finds study
A new Imperial College London study has answered a long-held question about why medium-sized land animals like cheetahs tend to be fastest. There's a discrepancy in the animal kingdom. While many key traits such as strength, limb length, lifespan and brain size tend to increase with animals' size, maximum running speeds tend to be greatest in medium-sized animals.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.03.2024
Mathematicians use AI to identify emerging COVID-19 variants
Scientists at The Universities of Manchester and Oxford have developed an AI framework that can identify and track new and concerning COVID-19 variants and could help with other infections in the future. The framework combines dimension reduction techniques and a new explainable clustering algorithm called CLASSIX, developed by mathematicians at The University of Manchester.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.03.2024
AI research gives unprecedented insight into heart genetics and structure
A ground-breaking research study has used AI to understand the genetic underpinning of the heart's left ventricle, using three-dimensional images of the organ. It was led by scientists at the University of Manchester, with collaborators from the University of Leeds (UK), the National Scientific and Technical Research Council (Santa Fe, Argentina), and IBM Research (Almaden, CA).

Health - Life Sciences - 08.03.2024
Children with ’lazy eye’ are at increased risk of serious disease in adulthood
Adults who had amblyopia ('lazy eye') in childhood are more likely to experience hypertension, obesity, and metabolic syndrome in adulthood, as well as an increased risk of heart attack, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. In publishing the study in eClinicalMedicine , the authors stress that while they have identified a correlation, their research does not show a causal relationship between amblyopia and ill health in adulthood.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.03.2024
Could a 'DNA diet' help to reduce health risks linked to high blood sugar?
Could a ’DNA diet’ help to reduce health risks linked to high blood sugar?
A UK trial has found a DNA-tailored diet could help manage blood glucose and reduce risk of progressing to type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals. The findings come from a small Imperial College London and DnaNudge pilot study involving 148 people with high blood sugar levels who were at risk of going on to develop type 2 diabetes (T2D).

Health - Life Sciences - 06.03.2024
Genetic mutation in a quarter of all Labradors hard-wires them for obesity
Genetic mutation in a quarter of all Labradors hard-wires them for obesity
New research finds around a quarter of Labrador retriever dogs face a double-whammy of feeling hungry all the time and burning fewer calories due to a genetic mutation. Labradors with this genetic mutation are looking for food all the time, trying to increase their energy intake. It's very difficult to keep these dogs slim, but it can be done.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.03.2024
AI reveals prostate cancer is not just one disease
Artificial Intelligence has helped scientists reveal a new form of aggressive prostate cancer, which could revolutionise how the disease is diagnosed and treated in the future. A Cancer Research study, published in  Cell Genomics , has revealed that prostate cancer, which affects one in eight men in their lifetime, includes two different subtypes termed evotypes.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.03.2024
Low iron levels resulting from infection could be key trigger of long COVID
Low iron levels resulting from infection could be key trigger of long COVID
Problems with iron levels in the blood and the body's ability to regulate this important nutrient as a result of SARS-CoV-2 infection could be a key trigger for long COVID, new research has discovered.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.03.2024
Stem cells collected in late pregnancy herald advances in prenatal medicine
Stem cells collected in late pregnancy herald advances in prenatal medicine
A pioneering approach, developed by researchers at UCL and Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), means human development can be observed in late pregnancy for the first time, raising the possibility of monitoring and treating congenital conditions before birth. The study, published in Nature Medicine , documents the first time that complex cell models, called organoids, have been grown from human stem cells during an active pregnancy.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.03.2024
Artificial Intelligence reveals prostate cancer is not just one disease
Artificial Intelligence has helped scientists reveal a new form of aggressive prostate cancer which could revolutionise how the disease is diagnosed and treated in the future. A new Cancer Research study has revealed that prostate cancer, which affects one in eight men in their lifetime, includes two different subtypes termed evotypes.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 26.02.2024
First DNA study of ancient Eastern Arabians reveals malaria adaptation
The first DNA study of the ancient population of Eastern Arabia sheds new light on their lives People living in ancient Eastern Arabia appear to have developed resistance to malaria following the appearance of agriculture in the region around five thousand years ago, a new study reveals. DNA analysis of the remains of four individuals from Tylos-period Bahrain (300 BCE to 600 CE) - the first ancient genomes from Eastern Arabia - revealed the malaria-protective G6PD Mediterranean mutation in three samples.

Life Sciences - Criminology / Forensics - 26.02.2024
Biocompatible fluorescent spray that detects fingerprints in ten seconds
Biocompatible fluorescent spray that detects fingerprints in ten seconds
Bath researchers have helped produce a safer, more sustainable fingerprint detection spray that could be used on multiple types of surface. Published on Monday 26 February 2024 Last updated on Monday 26 February 2024 Scientists have developed a water soluble, non-toxic fluorescent spray that makes fingerprints visible in just a few seconds, making forensic investigations safer, easier and quicker.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 23.02.2024
Compound vital for all life likely played a role in life's origin
Compound vital for all life likely played a role in life’s origin
A chemical compound essential to all living things has been synthesised in a lab in conditions that could have occurred on early Earth, suggesting it played a role at the outset of life, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The compound, pantetheine, is the active fragment of Coenzyme A. It is important for metabolism - the chemical processes that maintain life.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.02.2024
'Virtual biopsy' uses AI to help doctors assess lung cancer
’Virtual biopsy’ uses AI to help doctors assess lung cancer
Researchers have used artificial intelligence (AI) to extract information about the chemical makeup of lung tumours from medical scans. For the first time, they have demonstrated how combining medical imaging with AI can be used to provide a 'virtual biopsy' for cancer patients. Their non-invasive method can classify the type of lung cancer a patient has - which is crucial in selecting the right treatment - and can predict if the cancer is likely to progress.