news

« BACK

Life Sciences



Results 21 - 40 of 5008.


Life Sciences - Health - 20.06.2024
Surprising link between ancient biology and restricted human hair growth found
Surprising link between ancient biology and restricted human hair growth found
University of Manchester scientists have linked one of the ways that cells respond to stressful conditions with restricted healthy hair growth. The Manchester Hair Research Group team unexpectedly discovered the link in a lab experiment where they were testing a drug to see if it cultivates human scalp hair follicles in a dish.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.06.2024
Potential ’life-transforming’ mole reversal therapy shown in rare condition
Researchers at UCL, the Francis Crick Institute and Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) have designed a new genetic therapy in mice, that could alleviate debilitating giant moles that occur in a rare skin condition. The treatment could be used to reverse moles, and therefore prevent affected children and adults from developing cancer.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.06.2024
Poor metabolic health linked to worse brain health
People with poor metabolic health are more likely to have memory and thinking problems and worse brain health, according to a new study by researchers at Oxford Population Health. The study is published in Diabetes Care , and is the largest study into metabolic and brain health to date. Poor metabolic health, also known as "metabolic syndrome", is defined as having three or more of the following: a large waist circumference, high triglycerides, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and lower levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, sometimes known as 'good' cholesterol.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.06.2024
Blood test could predict Parkinson's seven years before symptoms
Blood test could predict Parkinson’s seven years before symptoms
A team of researchers, led by scientists at UCL and University Medical Center Goettingen, Germany, have developed a simple blood test that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to predict Parkinson's up to seven years before the onset of symptoms. Parkinson's disease is the world's fastest growing neurodegenerative disorder and currently affects nearly 10 million people across the globe.

Life Sciences - 13.06.2024
Brain regions that bias the brain's response to pleasure in bipolar disorder identified
Brain regions that bias the brain’s response to pleasure in bipolar disorder identified
Momentary shifts in mood, even those lasting just a matter of seconds, profoundly alter the brain's response to pleasurable experiences in people with bipolar disorder, finds a new study by UCL researchers. Previous research shows that mood can make us experience events in more positive or negative light - irrespective of having bipolar disorder.

Life Sciences - Environment - 12.06.2024
Polyandrous birds evolve faster than monogamous ones, says research
Polyandrous birds evolve faster than monogamous ones, says research
A new study by the Milner Centre for Evolution suggests that mating systems of birds have a stronger effect on evolution rates than previously thought. New research led by the University of Bath's Milner Centre for Evolution shows that shorebird species where females breed with multiple males in each season evolve significantly faster than monogamous species.

Life Sciences - 11.06.2024
What’s going on in our brains when we plan?
Study uncovers how the brain simulates possible future actions by drawing from our stored memories. In pausing to think before making an important decision, we may imagine the potential outcomes of different choices we could make. While this 'mental simulation' is central to how we plan and make decisions in everyday life, how the brain works to accomplish this is not well understood.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.06.2024
Boosting key protein in eye cells could prevent age-related vision loss
Boosting key protein in eye cells could prevent age-related vision loss
Increasing the levels of a key protein in the cells at the back of the eye could help protect against the leading cause of vision loss among older adults, finds a new study co-led by a UCL researcher. The findings from an international team based in the UK, US, Germany and Australia are published in Science Translational Medicine .

Environment - Life Sciences - 06.06.2024
Analysis: A new AI tool to help monitor coral reef health
Analysis: A new AI tool to help monitor coral reef health
PhD candidate Ben Williams (UCL Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research and ZSL's Institute of Zoology) writes with a colleague about why they built SurfPerch, an AI led system to make it faster and easier for marine scientists to answer ecological questions. Coral reefs cover only 0.1% of the ocean's surface - yet they host 25% of all known marine species.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 05.06.2024
Training cognitive control in children does not change brain or behaviour
Training exercises designed to improve cognitive control in children do not make a significant difference to their ability to delay gratification or to their academic achievement, nor do they lead to any brain changes, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The findings, published in Nature Neuroscience , appear to debunk the popular idea that brain training could improve cognitive control - the mental processes that allow us to set and pursue shortor long-term goals - and thereby lead to tangible benefits to other real-life outcomes.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 05.06.2024
'Missing' sea sponges discovered
’Missing’ sea sponges discovered
The discovery, published in Nature, opens a new window on early animal evolution. At first glance, the simple, spikey sea sponge is no creature of mystery. No brain. No gut. No problem dating them back 700 million years. Yet convincing sponge fossils only go back about 540 million years, leaving a 160-million-year gap in the fossil record.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.06.2024
Exercising during pregnancy normalises eating behaviours in offspring from obese mice
Exercising during pregnancy normalises eating behaviours in offspring from obese mice
Maternal obesity in pregnancy changes the eating behaviours of offspring by increasing long-term levels of particular molecules known as microRNAs in the part of the brain that controls appetite - but this can be changed by exercise during pregnancy, a study in obese mice has suggested.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.06.2024
Exercising during pregnancy normalises eating behaviors in offspring from obese mice
Exercising during pregnancy normalises eating behaviors in offspring from obese mice
Maternal obesity in pregnancy changes the eating behaviors of offspring by increasing long-term levels of particular molecules known as microRNAs in the part of the brain that controls appetite - but this can be changed by exercise during pregnancy, a study in obese mice has suggested.

Environment - Life Sciences - 03.06.2024
Rainforest wildlife under threat as below-canopy temperatures rise
Rainforest wildlife under threat as below-canopy temperatures rise
Assumptions that tropical forest canopies protect from the effects of climate change are unfounded, say researchers. A severe risk is that species are no longer able to survive within tropical forests as climate change intensifies, further exacerbating the global extinction crisis and degrading rainforest carbon stocks.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.06.2024
As ’bird flu’ in cattle raises concerns for milk safety in the US, scientists confirm that pasteurisation effectively inactivates influenza viruses
A new study has confirmed that pasteurisation temperatures, if applied for industry standard times, should effectively inactivate H5N1 influenza viruses in cows' milk and render it safe to consume.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.05.2024
Does sleep clear more toxins from the brain than when we're awake?
Does sleep clear more toxins from the brain than when we’re awake?
Dr Eleftheria Kodosaki (UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology) examines new evidence in The Conversation that suggests brain clearance is actually lower during sleep, contrary to the belief that the brain gets rid of more toxic waste when we're asleep than when we're awake. There's no doubt sleep is good for the brain.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.05.2024
Clone of Comment: The long history of weaponising law against Jews
Clone of Comment: The long history of weaponising law against Jews
Dr Eleftheria Kodosaki (UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology) examines new evidence in The Conversation that suggests brain clearance is actually lower during sleep, contrary to the belief that the brain gets rid of more toxic waste when we're asleep than when we're awake. There's no doubt sleep is good for the brain.

Life Sciences - Environment - 30.05.2024
Cuckoos evolve to look like their hosts - and form new species in the process
Cuckoos evolve to look like their hosts - and form new species in the process
Two decades of cuckoo research have helped scientists to explain how battles between species can cause new species to arise This exciting new finding could potentially apply to any pairs of species that are in battle with each other..the coevolutionary arms race could cause new species to emerge - and increase biodiversity on our planet Rebecca Kilner The theory of coevolution says that when closely interacting species drive evolutionary changes in each other this can lead to speciation - the evolution of new species.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.05.2024
New research from the RVC unlocks the key to hummingbird flight
New research from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC), UCLA and the University of British Columbia has found that hummingbirds create a 3D map of their body, which may enable them to hover and make nuanced adjustments to their flight dynamics based on the smallest of touches and airflow in their environment.

Microtechnics - Life Sciences - 24.05.2024
Imperceptible sensors made from 'electronic spider silk' can be printed directly on human skin
Imperceptible sensors made from ’electronic spider silk’ can be printed directly on human skin
Researchers have developed a method to make adaptive and eco-friendly sensors that can be directly and imperceptibly printed onto a wide range of biological surfaces, whether that's a finger or a flower petal. The method, developed by researchers from the University of Cambridge, takes its inspiration from spider silk, which can conform and stick to a range of surfaces.