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Health - Pharmacology - 12:06
Trial will look at new Parkinson’s treatment for frequent falls
Researchers have been awarded funding to trial a new treatment for frequent falls in patients with advanced Parkinson's. In Parkinson's disease, some parts of the brain begin to deteriorate, leading to symptoms including balance problems, which can increase the chances of falls. A team from Imperial College London and Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust have been awarded £250,000 from the Medical Research Council (MRC) to trial a surgical implant that alters nerve activity, which could improve movement and reduce the number of falls.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.10.2019
Detecting the (almost) undetectable: new cancer alliance
Detecting the (almost) undetectable: new cancer alliance
UCL research teams are part of a new transatlantic research alliance to develop radical new strategies and technologies to detect cancer at its earliest stage. Cancer Research UK is the lead funder of the International Alliance for Cancer Early Detection (ACED), a £55m investment bringing together UCL, Canary Center at Stanford University, the University of Cambridge, the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, and the University of Manchester.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.10.2019
Researchers identify a new way to target treatment-resistant cancers
An international team of researchers has found a different way cancer becomes resistant to chemotherapy, suggesting a new target for drugs. Chemotherapy kills cancers cells by preventing them from multiplying and by inducing ‘cell death', a natural process that can be enhanced with drugs. One form of cell death, called ferroptosis - iron-dependent cell death - is caused by the degradation of fats (lipids) that make up the cell membrane.

Sport - Health - 21.10.2019
Reveals dementia risk in former professional footballers
Study reveals dementia risk in former professional footballers A landmark study led by the University of Glasgow has revealed the first major insights into lifelong health outcomes in former professional footballers. In findings published today in The New England Journal of Medicine and funded by the Football Association (FA) and the Professional Footballers' Association (PFA), researchers compared the causes of death of 7,676 former Scottish ma

Health - 18.10.2019
Increase health benefits of exercise by working out before breakfast - new research
Exercising before eating breakfast burns more fat, improves how the body responds to insulin and lowers people's risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. According to a new study, published Friday 18 October 2019 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, health scientists at the Universities of Bath and Birmingham found that by changing the timing of when you eat and exercise, people can better control their blood sugar levels.

Health - 16.10.2019
Risk of brain damage in premature babies may reduce if born in specialist units
Extremely premature babies born in English hospitals with specialist neonatal intensive care units may have a reduced risk of brain damage and death. This is the finding of research, by a team from Imperial College London and the University of Turku , Finland, that involved 17,000 infants born in England earlier than 28 weeks gestation.

Pharmacology - Health - 16.10.2019
Global trial is first clear evidence that a widely available drug reduces head injury deaths
A low cost and widely available drug could reduce deaths in traumatic brain injury patients by as much as 20 per cent depending on the severity of injury, according to a major study carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham. The research, published in The Lancet, showed that tranexamic acid (TXA), a drug that prevents bleeding into the brain by inhibiting blood clot breakdown, has the potential to save hundreds of thousands of lives.

Health - 16.10.2019
Scientists link hormone production in baby wallabies to how some human girls are born with genitalia that appear more male than female
Research led by the Universities of Birmingham and Manchester has made a connection between the way baby wallabies produce male hormones and how some human girls are born with genitalia that resemble those of a boy. The research, published in PNAS and supported by the Wellcome Trust and the Medical Research Council, shows that an alternative pathway to the production of active male hormones - previously identified in the tammar wallaby pouch young - is present and active during human fetal development.

Health - Environment - 15.10.2019
Predicting Ebola outbreaks by understanding how ecosystems influence human health
The next Ebola outbreak could be predicted using a new UCL-developed model that tracks how changes to ecosystems and human societies combine to affect the spread of the deadly infectious disease. The model could help policymakers to decide where to target vaccine deployment, or develop healthcare infrastructure, to reduce the risk of zoonotic disease outbreaks - illnesses that spread between animals and humans.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.10.2019
Cell family trees tracked to discover their role in tissue scarring and liver disease
Cell family trees tracked to discover their role in tissue scarring and liver disease
Researchers have discovered that a key cell type involved in liver injury and cancer consists of two cellular families with different origins and functions. The research by academics from the Universities of Edinburgh and Bristol and funded by the Wellcome Trust and Medical Research Council, is published today [Tuesday 15 October] .

Health - Psychology - 10.10.2019
Aims to address suicide prevention in low- and middle-income countries
Aims to address suicide prevention in low- and middle-income countries
Future treatment and prevention of suicidal behaviour in lowand middle-income countries (LMIC) should involve a wider range of approaches beyond just the treatment of psychiatric illness, according to a new University of Bristol study published on World Mental Health Day today [Thursday 10 October] in PLOS Medicine.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.10.2019
Fresh insights could lead to new treatments for liver disease
The fight against liver disease could be helped by the discovery of cells that cause liver scarring. Scientists have identified new sub-types of cells that, when they interact, accelerate the scarring process in diseased livers. Experts hope that by understanding more how these cells behave, new treatments can be developed more quickly for liver diseases.

Life Sciences - Health - 09.10.2019
Badger culling drives animals further afield increasing risk of TB spread
New research reveals survivors of culls cover greater areas potentially increasing the risk of TB transmission to cattle. A study led by researchers at international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) and Imperial College London has found that culling drives badgers to roam 61% further afield - helping to explain why the practice, intended to reduce bovine TB transmission, can sometimes exacerbate the problem instead.

Health - Social Sciences - 07.10.2019
UNAIDS HIV targets will be missed among gay men in Africa
UNAIDS HIV targets will be missed among gay men in Africa
Despite improvements in HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Africa, many are missing out on HIV treatment. This is the finding of research, led by Imperial College London , which analysed data from 75 independent studies involving 44,993 MSM across 28 African countries, between 2004 and 2018.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.10.2019
Secrets of lung cancer spread found in patients' blood and biopsies
Secrets of lung cancer spread found in patients’ blood and biopsies
Early signs that a patient's lung cancer may spread and become untreatable can be picked up in samples of their blood and tumour, according to a trio of papers co-led by UCL. The three studies, published , are all part of Cancer Research UK's £14million TRACERx project, which aims to understand how lung cancer cells change over time and become resistant to treatment.

Health - 02.10.2019
Health worsens the longer you live in a deprived neighbourhood
Living in a deprived neighbourhood as a child can have negative effects on long-term health and the longer people stay in poor areas, the more likely they are to become ill, according to a UCL-led study. The international study, which is the first systematic review to bring together research on neighbourhood effects on health and well-being over the life course, is published today in the European Journal of Public Health.

Health - Pharmacology - 02.10.2019
Gut bacteria 'fingerprint' predicts radiotherapy side effects
Gut bacteria ’fingerprint’ predicts radiotherapy side effects
Scientists have conducted the first clinical study to show a link between types of gut bacteria and radiotherapy-induced gut damage. Taking a ‘fingerprint' of the mix of bacteria in the gut can indicate how susceptible individual cancer patients are to gut damage as a result of radiotherapy for prostate and gynaecological cancers, the new study shows.

Health - 01.10.2019
Analysis: Having sex in older age could make you happier and healthier
Dr Sarah Jackson (UCL Epidemiology & Health) co-authors an article discussing new research which examines the importance of having sex in older age. Sexual activity is an essential part of intimate relationships, though it tends to decline as people get older. But although research shows that frequency of sexual activity can decrease with age, for many older people, sex still remains an important part of their life.

Pharmacology - Health - 30.09.2019
Microneedle biosensors accurately detect patient antibiotic levels in real-time
Microneedle biosensors accurately detect patient antibiotic levels in real-time
Scientists have successfully used microneedle biosensors to accurately detect changes in antibiotic levels in the body, for the first time. Small, non-invasive patches worn on the skin can accurately detect the levels of medication in a patient's system, matching the accuracy of current clinical methods.

Pharmacology - Health - 30.09.2019
Fruit flies live longer with combination drug treatment
Fruit flies live longer with combination drug treatment
A triple drug combination has been used to extend the lifespan of fruit flies by 48% in a new study led by UCL and the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing. The three drugs are all already in use as medical treatments: lithium as a mood stabiliser, trametinib as a cancer treatment and rapamycin as an immune system regulator.
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