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Health - Pharmacology - 18.02.2020
Could statins lower the risk of ovarian cancer?
In the UK, ovarian cancer is the sixth most common cancer in females*. A new study has found evidence to suggest that statins could lower the risk of women developing ovarian cancer. Some previous observational epidemiological studies have suggested a link between statin use, a commonly prescribed medicine to reduce cholesterol, and a lower risk of ovarian cancer.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.02.2020
Gene tests for heart disease risk have limited benefit
Gene tests for heart disease risk have limited benefit
Genetic tests to predict a person's risk of heart disease and heart attack have limited benefit over conventional testing. This is the finding from scientists at Imperial College London , who devised a highly sophisticated test analysing thousands of so-called genetic variants linked to heart health.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.02.2020
How cancer cells communicate shown for first time
New technology developed at UCL is, for the first time, enabling cancer scientists to analyse the individual behaviour of millions of different cells living inside lab-grown tumours - a breakthrough which could lead to new personalised cancer treatments. The research, published in Nature Methods, provides new insight into how mutated cancer cells "mimic the growth signals" normally expressed by healthy cells - which allows cancer cells to grow unchecked.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.02.2020
How cancer cells communicate is seen for first time, thanks to UCL technology
New technology developed at UCL is, for the first time, enabling cancer scientists to analyse the individual behaviour of millions of different cells living inside lab-grown tumours - a breakthrough which could lead to new personalised cancer treatments. The research, published in Nature Methods, provides new insight into how mutated cancer cells "mimic the growth signals" normally expressed by healthy cells - which allows cancer cells to grow unchecked.

Environment - Health - 17.02.2020
To provide new insights into health impact of urban pollution
To provide new insights into health impact of urban pollution
Londoners equipped with wearable sensors will help researchers understand the effects of air pollution on personal health in real time. Air pollution is one of the world's greatest environmental threats, responsible for an estimated 7 million deaths every year. A new study, led by Imperial College London with partners at the University of Surrey and the University of Edinburgh, will provide the most detailed account yet of the specific personal health consequences of exposure to different air pollutants in urban environments.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.02.2020
Zooming in on breast cancer reveals how mutations shape the tumour landscape
Zooming in on breast cancer reveals how mutations shape the tumour landscape
Scientists have created one of the most detailed maps of breast cancer ever achieved, revealing how genetic changes shape the physical tumour landscape, according to research funded published in Nature Cancer . We've shown that the effects of mutations in cancer are far more wide-ranging than first thought Carlos Caldas An international team of scientists, brought together by a £20 million Grand Challenge award from Cancer Research UK, has developed intricate maps of breast tumour samples, with a resolution smaller than a single cell.

Health - Pharmacology - 17.02.2020
Bile duct cancer treatment potential boost from tailored medication - study
Treatment of patients suffering from bile duct cancer could be improved by tailoring medication to the levels of a key protein in people with the disease, according to new research. Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a deadly disease with few treatments, but researchers in the UK and Thailand have discovered that the PRH/HHEX protein is a key driver in the disease, with increased levels affecting the response of cancer cells to therapeutic drugs.

Health - Psychology - 17.02.2020
Mortality from all causes over 40 per cent higher in female domestic abuse survivors
Women who have experienced domestic abuse appear to be more than 40 per cent more likely to die from any cause compared to the general population, a study led by the Universities of Warwick and Birmingham suggests. The researchers have also identified an increased risk of developing cardiometabolic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in those who have experienced domestic abuse, although more research is required to determine what other factors specifically lead to an increase in their mortality.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.02.2020
Cough syrup drug being trialled as Parkinson’s treatment
After finding that a drug found in cough syrups may have use as a treatment for Parkinson's disease, UCL researchers have received funding for the next stage in clinical trials. Ambroxol, a medication originally designed to clear phlegm and ease coughing for people with respiratory diseases such as bronchitis, is being tested to see if it can slow down the progression of Parkinson's disease by keeping cells healthier for longer.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.02.2020
AI helps predict heart attacks and stroke
Artificial intelligence has been used for the first time to instantly and accurately measure blood flow, in a study led by UCL and Barts Health NHS Trust. The results were found to be able to predict chances of death, heart attack and stroke, and can be used by doctors to help recommend treatments which could improve a patient's blood flow.

Health - Pharmacology - 13.02.2020
Kisspeptin hormone injection can boost brain activity associated with attraction
The hormone kisspeptin can enhance brain activity associated with attraction, according to a new study. The researchers behind the early-stage work, published in JCI Insight , are exploring whether kisspeptin can ultimately be used to treat men with common psychosexual disorders - sexual problems which are psychological in origin such as low libido.

Health - Pharmacology - 13.02.2020
Scientists closer to finding the cell of origin for ovarian cancer
Researchers have used a new technique to identify six previously unknown cell types in human Fallopian tubes, paving the way for faster identification and treatment of ovarian cancer. Researchers at the University of Oxford are now closer to finding the cell of origin of ovarian cancer, and their ultimate aim of developing a much needed screening tool for ovarian cancer.  Ovarian cancer is the sixth most common cancer in women, with around 7,500 new cases diagnosed in the UK each year (1).

Life Sciences - Health - 13.02.2020
Huge bacteria-killing viruses blur the boundaries defining life
Hundreds of unusually large, bacteria-killing viruses with capabilities normally associated with living organisms, have been identified by a team involving UCL, blurring the line between viruses and living microbes. These phages - short for bacteriophage, so-called because they "eat" bacteria - are of a size and complexity considered typical of life, carry numerous genes normally found in bacteria, and use these genes against their bacterial hosts and other viruses, as reported in Nature .

Health - 13.02.2020
Urgent improvements needed in the care of children with suspected appendicitis - study
Thousands of UK children undergo unnecessary appendix surgery each year in the NHS, a new study reveals. Surgery for appendicitis is the most common emergency operation in children. A new study has found that the UK has the highest reported national rate of ‘normal appendicectomy,' where children undergo surgery for suspected appendicitis but laboratory examination of the removed appendix finds it to be normal.

Health - 11.02.2020
Coronavirus fatality rate estimated by Imperial scientists
Coronavirus fatality rate estimated by Imperial scientists
Researchers have released estimates on the fatality rate of coronavirus. According to the latest estimates from the team, from the MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis at Imperial, one percent of people with the disease will die from their infection. Our estimates suggest the impact of the unfolding epidemic may be comparable to the major influenza pandemics of the twentieth century Professor Neil Ferguson Report author This is the fourth report from the team, who are also part of J-IDEA, the Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.02.2020
HRH The Princess Royal opens new microscopy centre
A state-of-the-art centre for advanced biomedical research imaging was opened today (Tuesday) at UCL by Her Royal Highness The Princess Royal, giving researchers access to cutting-edge new microscopes from ZEISS. The UCL Multiscale Imaging Centre, in partnership with ZEISS (to be known as UZMIC), is the first ZEISS laboratory in Europe outside of Germany, strengthening UCL's connections across Europe.

Health - Computer Science / Telecom - 11.02.2020
Skin cancer diagnosis apps are unreliable and poorly regulated
Smartphone apps used as ‘early warning systems' for skin cancer are poorly regulated and frequently cannot be relied upon to produce accurate results, according to new analysis by experts at the University of Birmingham. Skin cancer detection apps are designed to ensure that the right people seek medical attention by providing a risk assessment of a new or changing mole.

Social Sciences - Health - 11.02.2020
E-cigarettes may be helping disadvantaged smokers to quit
New research confirms that low numbers of young people are vaping (using e-cigarettes), with vaping more common in young people from disadvantaged households who had never smoked before. The study, led by the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow and published today in BMC Public Health, also found that while disadvantaged adult smokers were less likely to have quit smoking, this inequality was smaller among those who vaped, suggesting vaping may be helping this group of smokers to quit.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.02.2020
Global initiative to use wearables to revolutionise disease detection
A global initiative involving UCL researchers will be using wearable technology such as wristbands and mobile apps to revolutionise the early detection of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. The Early Detection of Neurodegenerative diseases (EDoN) initiative, led by Alzheimer's Research UK, will harness and analyse a wealth of digital data to develop signatures of disease - or "fingerprints" - that can be then detected using wearable technologies, such as smart watches.

Life Sciences - Health - 10.02.2020
The brain of migraine sufferers is hyper-excitable
Individuals who suffer from migraine headaches appear to have a hyper-excitable visual cortex researchers at the Universities of Birmingham and Lancaster suggest. Migraines are characterised as debilitating and persistent headaches, often accompanied by an increased sensitivity to visual or other sensory stimuli.
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